Special Issue "High Pressure Processing of Foods"

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A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Carl J. Schaschke

Head of School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Abertay University, Bell Street, Dundee, DD1 1HG, Scotland

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

High pressure processing (HPP) is increasingly being used to create new, exciting, minimally processed food products worldwide that are safe, innovative and affordable. The uniqueness, novelty and purpose of HPP is the preservation, retention and improvement of food quality in terms of taste, flavour, texture and colour. Consumers nowadays increasingly expect the food to be safe, of a high quality, minimally processed, 'natural', additive-free and high in nutritional value. The unique effects of HPP appear to be able to meet these requirements. HPP is proven to be effective in the destruction of harmful pathogenic micro-organisms, the activation and deactivation of food spoilage enzymes, the change of functional properties, such as foams, gels and emulsions, and the control of phase change, such as fat solidification and ice melting point. The sterilisation properties of high pressure food processing have been compared to that of heat treatment. Bacteria, yeasts and moulds are readily destroyed by high isostatic pressure while bacterial spores and some viruses are particularly resistant; spores being only inactivated by pressure after germination in what some term ‘pascalisation’ as an analogy to the heat treatment of pasteurization. Another difference between thermal and HPP is that while heat is conducted through the exterior of foods to penetrate the interior, which takes time and often involves over-cooking of the surface, pressure is applied instantaneously and uniformly.

Prof. Dr. Carl J. Schaschke
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • high pressure processing
  • isostatic pressure
  • functional properties
  • enzyme inactivation
  • sterilisation

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle High Hydrostatic Pressure Pretreatment of Whey Protein Isolates Improves Their Digestibility and Antioxidant Capacity
Foods 2015, 4(2), 184-207; doi:10.3390/foods4020184
Received: 31 March 2015 / Revised: 15 May 2015 / Accepted: 20 May 2015 / Published: 28 May 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (652 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Whey proteins have well-established antioxidant and anti-inflammatory bioactivities. High hydrostatic pressure processing of whey protein isolates increases their in vitro digestibility resulting in enhanced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. This study compared the effects of different digestion protocols on the digestibility of pressurized [...] Read more.
Whey proteins have well-established antioxidant and anti-inflammatory bioactivities. High hydrostatic pressure processing of whey protein isolates increases their in vitro digestibility resulting in enhanced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. This study compared the effects of different digestion protocols on the digestibility of pressurized (pWPI) and native (nWPI) whey protein isolates and the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of the hydrolysates. The pepsin-pancreatin digestion protocol was modified to better simulate human digestion by adjusting temperature and pH conditions, incubation times, enzymes utilized, enzyme-to-substrate ratio and ultrafiltration membrane molecular weight cut-off. pWPI showed a significantly greater proteolysis rate and rate of peptide appearance regardless of digestion protocol. Both digestion methods generated a greater relative abundance of eluting peptides and the appearance of new peptide peaks in association with pWPI digestion in comparison to nWPI hydrolysates. Hydrolysates of pWPI from both digestion conditions showed enhanced ferric-reducing antioxidant power relative to nWPI hydrolysates. Likewise, pWPI hydrolysates from both digestion protocols showed similar enhanced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in a respiratory epithelial cell line as compared to nWPI hydrolysates. These findings indicate that regardless of considerable variations of in vitro digestion protocols, pressurization of WPI leads to more efficient digestion that improves its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
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Open AccessArticle Quality Characteristics and Shelf-Life of Ultra-High Pressure Homogenized (UHPH) Almond Beverage
Foods 2015, 4(2), 159-172; doi:10.3390/foods4020159
Received: 9 April 2015 / Revised: 7 May 2015 / Accepted: 9 May 2015 / Published: 20 May 2015
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Abstract
The effects of ultra-high-pressure homogenization (UHPH) at 200 MPa, in combination with different inlet temperatures (55 or 75 °C) during storage at 4 °C were studied and compared with pasteurized (90 °C, 90 s) almond beverage. Microbiological analysis of the physical (particle [...] Read more.
The effects of ultra-high-pressure homogenization (UHPH) at 200 MPa, in combination with different inlet temperatures (55 or 75 °C) during storage at 4 °C were studied and compared with pasteurized (90 °C, 90 s) almond beverage. Microbiological analysis of the physical (particle sedimentation and color) and volatile profile of the most relevant compound in almond beverages was performed at days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of cold storage. UHPH treatment 200 at 75 °C led to higher microbiological reduction after treatment and higher stability during cold storage in almond beverages than pasteurization or UHPH 200 at 55 °C. Physical characteristics of UHPH-treated samples exhibited a high stability during storage with a stable color. Volatile compounds extracted by solid-phase microextraction were identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The effect of UHPH treatment significantly (p < 0.05) affected the volatile profile compared with pasteurized beverages, although UHPH conditions applied produced similar effects in almond beverages. Benzaldehyde was the most abundant compound detected in all treatments. Hexanal was more abundant in UHPH-treated samples, indicating a higher lipid oxidation compared to pasteurized almond beverages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
Open AccessArticle Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Water Absorption of Adzuki Beans
Foods 2015, 4(2), 148-158; doi:10.3390/foods4020148
Received: 13 March 2015 / Accepted: 7 May 2015 / Published: 14 May 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (239 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment on dried soybean, adzuki bean, and kintoki kidney bean, which are low-moisture-content cellular biological materials, was investigated from the viewpoint of water absorption. The samples were vacuum-packed with distilled water and pressurized at 200 [...] Read more.
The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment on dried soybean, adzuki bean, and kintoki kidney bean, which are low-moisture-content cellular biological materials, was investigated from the viewpoint of water absorption. The samples were vacuum-packed with distilled water and pressurized at 200 MPa and 25 °C for 10 min. After the HHP treatment, time courses of the moisture contents of the samples were measured, and the dimensionless moisture contents were estimated. Water absorption in the case of soybean could be fitted well by a simple water diffusion model. High pressures were found to have negligible effects on water absorption into the cotyledon of soybean and kintoki kidney bean. A non-linear least square method based on the Weibull equation was applied for the adzuki beans, and the effective water diffusion coefficient was found to increase significantly from 8.6 × 10−13 to 6.7 × 10−10 m2/s after HHP treatment. Approximately 30% of the testa of the adzuki bean was damaged upon HHP treatment, which was comparable to the surface area of the testa in the partially peeled adzuki bean sample. Thus, HHP was confirmed to promote mass transfer to the cotyledon of legumes with a tight testa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
Open AccessArticle Effects of Pressure, Temperature, Treatment Time, and Storage on Rheological, Textural, and Structural Properties of Heat-Induced Chickpea Gels
Foods 2015, 4(2), 80-114; doi:10.3390/foods4020080
Received: 13 March 2015 / Revised: 7 April 2015 / Accepted: 9 April 2015 / Published: 15 April 2015
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Abstract
Pressure-induced gelatinization of chickpea flour (CF) was studied in combination with subsequent temperature-induced gelatinization. CF slurries (with 1:5 flour-to-water ratio) and CF in powder form were treated with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), temperature (T), and treatment time (t) [...] Read more.
Pressure-induced gelatinization of chickpea flour (CF) was studied in combination with subsequent temperature-induced gelatinization. CF slurries (with 1:5 flour-to-water ratio) and CF in powder form were treated with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), temperature (T), and treatment time (t) at three levels (200, 400, 600 MPa; 10, 25, 50 °C; 5, 15, 25 min). In order to investigate the effect of storage (S), half of the HHP-treated CF slurries were immediately analyzed for changes in oscillatory rheological properties under isothermal heating at 75 °C for 15 min followed by cooling to 25 °C. The other half of the HHP-treated CF slurries were refrigerated (at 4 °C) for one week and subsequently analyzed for changes in oscillatory properties under the same heating conditions as the unrefrigerated samples. HHP-treated CF in powder form was analyzed for changes in textural properties of heat-induced CF gels under isothermal heating at 90 °C for 5 min and subsequent cooling to 25 °C. Structural changes during gelatinization were investigated using microscopy. Pressure had a more significant effect on rheological and textural properties, followed by T and treatment t (in that order). Gel aging in HHP-treated CF slurries during storage was supported by rheological measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
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Open AccessArticle Combined Effect of Pressure-Assisted Thermal Processing and Antioxidants on the Retention of Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Milk
Foods 2015, 4(2), 65-79; doi:10.3390/foods4020065
Received: 21 January 2015 / Revised: 18 March 2015 / Accepted: 28 March 2015 / Published: 14 April 2015
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Abstract
The effect of pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP) in combination with seven synthetic antioxidants was evaluated on the retention of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in enriched milk. Milk rich in CLA was first saturated with oxygen, followed by the addition of either catechin, [...] Read more.
The effect of pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP) in combination with seven synthetic antioxidants was evaluated on the retention of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in enriched milk. Milk rich in CLA was first saturated with oxygen, followed by the addition of either catechin, cysteine, ascorbic acid, tannic acid, gallic acid, caffeic acid or p-coumaric acid (500 mg kg1 untreated milk). Samples were treated at 600 MPa and 120 °C up to 15 min of holding time. During PATP, CLA not only oxidized at a slower rate, but also less oxygen was consumed compared to the control (0.1 MPa and 120 °C). In addition, phenolic antioxidants were able to quench dissolved oxygen in samples treated with PATP. For those samples added with gallic acid and catechin, 85% and 75% of the CLA was retained after 15 min of holding time at 600 MPa and 120 °C, respectively. The retention of CLA was enhanced by the application of PATP in combination with gallic acid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
Open AccessArticle A Novel Proteomic Analysis of the Modifications Induced by High Hydrostatic Pressure on Hazelnut Water-Soluble Proteins
Foods 2014, 3(2), 279-289; doi:10.3390/foods3020279
Received: 28 January 2014 / Revised: 17 April 2014 / Accepted: 17 April 2014 / Published: 5 May 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (616 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Food allergies to hazelnut represent an important health problem in industrialized countries because of their high prevalence and severity. Food allergenicity can be changed by several processing procedures since food proteins may undergo modifications which could alter immunoreactivity. High-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is [...] Read more.
Food allergies to hazelnut represent an important health problem in industrialized countries because of their high prevalence and severity. Food allergenicity can be changed by several processing procedures since food proteins may undergo modifications which could alter immunoreactivity. High-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is an emerging processing technology used to develop novel and high-quality foods. The effect of HHP on allergenicity is currently being investigated through changes in protein structure. Our aim is to evaluate the effect of HHP on the protein profile of hazelnut immunoreactive extracts by comparative proteomic analysis with ProteomeLab PF-2D liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. This protein fractionation method resolves proteins by isoelectric point and hydrophobicity in the first and second dimension, respectively. Second dimension chromatogram analyses show that some protein peaks present in unpressurized hazelnut must be unsolubilized and are not present in HHP-treated hazelnut extracts. Our results show that HHP treatment at low temperature induced marked changes on hazelnut water-soluble protein profile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Multi-Pulsed High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment of Foods
Foods 2015, 4(2), 173-183; doi:10.3390/foods4020173
Received: 16 February 2015 / Accepted: 16 May 2015 / Published: 25 May 2015
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Abstract
Multi-pulsed high hydrostatic pressure (mpHHP) treatment of foods has been investigated for more than two decades. It was reported that the mpHHP treatment, with few exceptions, is more effective than the classical or single-pulsed HHP (spHHP) treatment for inactivation of microorganisms in [...] Read more.
Multi-pulsed high hydrostatic pressure (mpHHP) treatment of foods has been investigated for more than two decades. It was reported that the mpHHP treatment, with few exceptions, is more effective than the classical or single-pulsed HHP (spHHP) treatment for inactivation of microorganisms in fruit juice, dairy products, liquid whole egg, meat products, and sea foods. Moreover, the mpHHP treatment could be also used to inactivate enzymes in foods and to increase the shelf-life of foods. The effects of the mpHHP treatment of foods are summarized and the differences between the mpHHP and spHHP are also emphasized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
Open AccessReview High Pressure Treatment in Foods
Foods 2014, 3(3), 476-490; doi:10.3390/foods3030476
Received: 8 May 2014 / Revised: 9 July 2014 / Accepted: 14 July 2014 / Published: 19 August 2014
PDF Full-text (189 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
High hydrostatic pressure (HHP), a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional). Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells [...] Read more.
High hydrostatic pressure (HHP), a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional). Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells and many enzymes. All this makes HHP very attractive, with very good acceptance by consumers, who value the organoleptic characteristics of products processed by this non-thermal food preservation technology because they associate these products with fresh-like. On the other hand, this technology reduces the need for non-natural synthetic additives of low consumer acceptance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)
Open AccessReview High Pressure Processing of Bivalve Shellfish and HPP’s Use as a Virus Intervention
Foods 2014, 3(2), 336-350; doi:10.3390/foods3020336
Received: 8 April 2014 / Revised: 30 April 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 11 June 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (238 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bivalve shellfish readily bioconcentrate pathogenic microbes and substance, such as algal and dinoflagulate toxins, fecal viruses and bacteria, and naturally present vibrio bacteria. High pressure processing (HPP) is currently used as an intervention for Vibrio vulnificus bacteria within molluscan shellfish and its [...] Read more.
Bivalve shellfish readily bioconcentrate pathogenic microbes and substance, such as algal and dinoflagulate toxins, fecal viruses and bacteria, and naturally present vibrio bacteria. High pressure processing (HPP) is currently used as an intervention for Vibrio vulnificus bacteria within molluscan shellfish and its potential to inactivate food-borne viruses and bacteria are discussed. Mechanisms of action of high pressure against bacteria and viruses, as well as how time of pressure application, pressure levels, and pre-pressurization temperature influence inactivation are described. Matrix influences such as ionic strength are noted as important additional considerations. The potential of HPP to influence spoilage and enhance shelf-life of shucked shellfish is also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Processing of Foods)

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