Special Issue "Selected Papers from International Conference on Raw Material to Processed Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Processing and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Serkan Selli

Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey
E-Mail
Phone: 905435615304
Interests: food chemistry; volatile compounds; key odorants; phenolic compounds
Co-Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hasim Kelebek

Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, University of Science and Technology of Adana, Adana, Turkey
E-Mail
Interests: food biotechnology; phenolic compounds; volatile compounds; instrumental analysis of foods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As is known, food has been a main concern of mankind, not only because it is essential to live, grow, and function, but also because it has a substantial effect on the economy with daily produced crops. As the utilization of raw materials has widened from hunger satisfaction to nutrient supplying, and usage in the prevention of nutrition-related diseases, innovative food processing technologies were created in response to this. Food processing is already a crucial field, and has been since ancient times, paving the way for humanity to lead a sedentary life and was also essential in supporting civilization. Moreover, topics like public health, sustainability challenges and preference of consumers necessitate this field to change and develop continuously. Hence, the food industry is resolutely looking for different procedures to produce and store crops. In these circumstances, researchers play a vital role in the development of new novel technologies.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an update to the knowledge and important actions that have been carried out at a global scale in the field of food processing technology for raw materials. From the enormous amount of knowledge generated from different processes, submissions about raw materials, including meat and seafood, milk, fruits, vegetables, cereals, medicinal aromatic plants, edible oils, wines, beverages, and all kinds of technologies (thermal, nonthermal, high static pressure processing, etc.) applied on these food materials, are particularly encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Serkan Selli
Prof. Dr. Hasim Kelebek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Raw and processed food products
  • Softening technology for food processing
  • Nutritional assessment of processed foods
  • Instrumental and sensory analysis of food products
  • Meat and seafood processing
  • Postharvest applications of raw materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Effect of Using Different Kinds and Ratios of Vegetable Oils on Ice Cream Quality Characteristics
Received: 29 May 2018 / Revised: 29 June 2018 / Accepted: 30 June 2018 / Published: 3 July 2018
PDF Full-text (1457 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this study was to develop ice cream products using different types of oils, a sensory ballot to focus on the textural attributes of new ice cream products, evaluate physicochemical properties of these products and physical measurements. Milkfat, hazelnut oil and
[...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to develop ice cream products using different types of oils, a sensory ballot to focus on the textural attributes of new ice cream products, evaluate physicochemical properties of these products and physical measurements. Milkfat, hazelnut oil and olive oil were mixed at different concentrations for a total of 12% fat. Control sample contains 12% milk fat while the other formulations contain different proportion of milk fat, hazelnut oil and olive oil as the fat content. The combination of the different proportion of milk fat, hazelnut oil and olive oil are given as % milk fat, % hazelnut oil and % olive oil respectively; 12:0:0, 0:12:0, 0:0:12, 6:6:0, 6:0:6, 0:6:6, 4:4:4. The pH, free acidity, total solid ingredient, b* value and volume increase rate were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Sensory analysis results showed that: samples were 50% hazelnut oil-50% olive oil had the highest color and appearance scores. On the other hand, the highest score in body and texture scores were belongs to the sample of used 50% milk fat-50% hazelnut oil and 50% milk fat-50% olive oil, 50% milk fat-50% olive oil the most preferred ones in total quality criterions. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Characterization of Aroma-Active Compounds in Seed Extract of Black Cumin (Nigella sativa L.) by Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis
Received: 25 May 2018 / Revised: 26 June 2018 / Accepted: 26 June 2018 / Published: 27 June 2018
PDF Full-text (601 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Turkish Nigella sativa L. seed extracts were used to detect the aroma and key odorant compounds of the spice using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O). Volatile compounds were extracted by the purge and trap extraction (PTE) method. A total of 32 volatile compounds consisting
[...] Read more.
Turkish Nigella sativa L. seed extracts were used to detect the aroma and key odorant compounds of the spice using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O). Volatile compounds were extracted by the purge and trap extraction (PTE) method. A total of 32 volatile compounds consisting of different chemical classes acids (13), alcohols (7), phenols (3), terpene (1), esters (2), ketones (2), aldehyde (1), lactone (1) and hydrocarbons (2) were determined. The amounts of volatile compounds were found to be 21,544 µg kg−1. The application of aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) revealed the presence of 13 odor-active compounds alcohols (2), carboxylic acids (4), phenols (2), terpene (1), ketone (1), hydrocarbon (1) and unknown compounds (2) in Nigella sativa L. extract. Flavor dilution (FD) factors of key odorants ranged between 4 and 1024, while odor activity values (OAV) were in the range of 1.0 to 170.8. Acetoin was the only aroma-active ketone detected in Nigella sativa L. seed extracts. It had the strongest aroma (FD = 1024) and provided a buttery odor. This compound represented the most abundant compound of overall aroma profile with a concentration of 9394 µg kg−1, followed by isobutanoic acid (FD = 512 with a concentration of 218 µg kg−1) and contributed a powerful aroma and a cheesy characteristic odor. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Potential Use of Bacillus coagulans in the Food Industry
Received: 1 May 2018 / Revised: 9 June 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 13 June 2018
PDF Full-text (246 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Probiotic microorganisms are generally considered to beneficially affect host health when used in adequate amounts. Although generally used in dairy products, they are also widely used in various commercial food products such as fermented meats, cereals, baby foods, fruit juices, and ice creams.
[...] Read more.
Probiotic microorganisms are generally considered to beneficially affect host health when used in adequate amounts. Although generally used in dairy products, they are also widely used in various commercial food products such as fermented meats, cereals, baby foods, fruit juices, and ice creams. Among lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are the most commonly used bacteria in probiotic foods, but they are not resistant to heat treatment. Probiotic food diversity is expected to be greater with the use of probiotics, which are resistant to heat treatment and gastrointestinal system conditions. Bacillus coagulans (B. coagulans) has recently attracted the attention of researchers and food manufacturers, as it exhibits characteristics of both the Bacillus and Lactobacillus genera. B. coagulans is a spore-forming bacterium which is resistant to high temperatures with its probiotic activity. In addition, a large number of studies have been carried out on the low-cost microbial production of industrially valuable products such as lactic acid and various enzymes of B. coagulans which have been used in food production. In this review, the importance of B. coagulans in food industry is discussed. Moreover, some studies on B. coagulans products and the use of B. coagulans as a probiotic in food products are summarized. Full article
Back to Top