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Special Issue "Building Simulation and Resilience of Buildings to Extreme Weather Events"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2017

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ali Bahadori-Jahromi

School of Computing and Engineering, University Of West London
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Sustainable engineering; Building simulation; Building design; Building Engineering; Building envelope; Carbon dioxide (Co2)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue includes selected articles that contribute to existing knowledge on various aspect of building energy consumption, simulation, and enhancing the resilience of buildings to extreme weather events.

The 2015 COP21 Paris climate agreement highlights the increased global effort to reduce global Green House Gas (GHG) emissions to curb the adverse effect of climate change. The effects of global warming are complex and wide ranging which can include, increased flooding, rise in sea level, increased temperature, drought, etc. Consequently, reduction in building energy consumption is, therefore, important, as, globally, buildings account for almost half of the energy use in both developed and developing nations. Furthermore, the design of resilient buildings in light of the current threats of extreme weather events due to climate change have also become paramount.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect and present innovative research results, advancements and established methodologies directed towards improvement of building energy performance, occupants thermal comfort and design of extreme weather events resilience buildings. In this framework, this Special Issue aims at collecting contributions that include:

  • Improvement in building energy efficiency (domestic, non-domestic, public and other buildings).
  • Estimation and validation of energy consumption in new and existing buildings.
  • Strategies and technologies to improve building energy efficiency.
  • Renewable energy.
  • Heat recovery, cogeneration or tri-generation systems.
  • Building refurbishment and retrofitting.
  • Extreme weather events resilience buildings.
  • Building simulation modelling.

It is believed that this Special Issue can contribute to the global effort to improving energy efficiency in buildings in a sustainable manner, thereby helping to reduce the adverse effect of global climate change.

Dr Ali B-Jahromi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Building simulation
  • Energy efficiency
  • Energy consumption
  • Sustainability
  • Building retrofit
  • Resilient buildings

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Outdoor Thermal Comfort in a Transitional Space of Canopy in Schools in the UK
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1753; doi:10.3390/su9101753
Received: 29 August 2017 / Revised: 22 September 2017 / Accepted: 24 September 2017 / Published: 28 September 2017
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Abstract
There has been a significant increase in opportunities to improve school environments in the UK. There has, however, been little study on the design of sheltered transitional spaces, despite growing architectural demand for this, examples of which can be easily found in most
[...] Read more.
There has been a significant increase in opportunities to improve school environments in the UK. There has, however, been little study on the design of sheltered transitional spaces, despite growing architectural demand for this, examples of which can be easily found in most primary schools in the UK. Computer simulations (Rayman, Ecotect and Winair4) were performed to identify the influence of different parameters: that of having a canopy; the effect of the transmissivity of the canopy material (three transparencies 0%, 50% and 90% were considered); orientation (four orientations—north, east, south and west—were considered); and location (three cities: London, Manchester and Glasgow). The combined effects of canopy transparency and orientation were shown to be critical design considerations in affecting comfort conditions in outdoor spaces. It was found that outdoor comfort conditions in the transitional space can be enhanced by 41.5% in August by choosing a canopy of 0% transparency, compared with a canopy of 90% transparency in London. The fixed canopy with a higher transparency helped to increase outdoor thermal comfort in Glasgow, while one with a lower transparency showed better performance during summer in London. This research will help design environmentally sophisticated transitional spaces in schools. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Estimation and Validation of Energy Consumption in UK Existing Hotel Building Using Dynamic Simulation Software
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1391; doi:10.3390/su9081391
Received: 26 June 2017 / Revised: 4 August 2017 / Accepted: 5 August 2017 / Published: 7 August 2017
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Abstract
Adverse effects of anthropogenic climate change has resulted in mitigation strategies geared towards curbing CO2 emissions. Consequently, this has increased demand for more energy efficient buildings. Considerable amounts of studies have shown the existence of a significant discrepancy between estimated energy consumption
[...] Read more.
Adverse effects of anthropogenic climate change has resulted in mitigation strategies geared towards curbing CO2 emissions. Consequently, this has increased demand for more energy efficient buildings. Considerable amounts of studies have shown the existence of a significant discrepancy between estimated energy consumption by thermal simulation software and actual building operational energy; this is referred to as a ‘performance gap’. This work presents a method of improving the energy consumption estimate in an existing non-domestic building via the use of a case study UK hotel (Hilton Reading Hotel) and Engineering Development Solutions limited (EDSL) TAS thermal simulation software. The method involves evaluating consumption estimates through plant modelling, and modifying this result by surveying the site to verify the simulation data and including estimates of unaccounted building energy use such as catering services which can be significant in hotels. The energy consumption result for this case study building gives an estimate which is within 12% of the actual building consumption data. The result also demonstrated that such models can produce energy consumption estimates that are up to 23% more accurate than building regulation compliance models and that more accurate simulation consumption estimates can be achieved by accounting for more unregulated energy uses, for example, lifts, servers and small power load. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Study on Dynamic Response of Novel Masonry Structures Impacted by Debris Flow
Sustainability 2017, 9(7), 1122; doi:10.3390/su9071122
Received: 7 May 2017 / Revised: 20 June 2017 / Accepted: 23 June 2017 / Published: 27 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5125 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Debris flow is a very destructive natural disaster. This paper presents a novel masonry structure with strong resistance to debris flow—by using walls that are set with braces and filled with straw bricks. This structure was designed according to the concepts of sustainability.
[...] Read more.
Debris flow is a very destructive natural disaster. This paper presents a novel masonry structure with strong resistance to debris flow—by using walls that are set with braces and filled with straw bricks. This structure was designed according to the concepts of sustainability. In order to study the dynamic response of this novel masonry structure under debris flow, finite element models of different masonry structures were established by means of LS-DYNA software. The responses of this novel structure and other traditional structures were calculated and compared when the rock of debris flow hits the center of the wall. Results showed that the out-of-plane stiffness of the impacted wall with cross braces was enhanced in this novel structure, leading to an increased resistance to the impact of debris flow more effectively. Furthermore, braces were able to stop rocks in the debris flow and dissipate the corresponding energy through deformation. These braces also improved anti-collapse capabilities, leading to an increase in the safety of people’s lives and properties. This novel structure is a response to national policies and plans, which plays an active role in promoting sustainable development of society. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Impact of Window Films on the Overall Energy Consumption of Existing UK Hotel Buildings
Sustainability 2017, 9(5), 731; doi:10.3390/su9050731
Received: 20 March 2017 / Revised: 11 April 2017 / Accepted: 27 April 2017 / Published: 2 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4910 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recently, considerable attention has justifiably been directed towards energy savings in buildings as they account for up to 20–40% of total energy consumption in developed countries. In the United Kingdom, studies have revealed that buildings’ CO2 emissions for account for at least
[...] Read more.
Recently, considerable attention has justifiably been directed towards energy savings in buildings as they account for up to 20–40% of total energy consumption in developed countries. In the United Kingdom, studies have revealed that buildings’ CO2 emissions for account for at least 43% of total emissions. Window panels are a major component of the building fabric with considerable influence on the façade energy performance and are accountable for up to 60% of a building’s overall energy loss. Therefore, the thermal performance of glazing materials is an important issue within the built environment. This work evaluates the impact of solar window films on the overall energy consumption of an existing commercial building via the use of a case study U.K. hotel and TAS dynamic simulation software. The study results demonstrated that the impact of window films on the overall energy consumption of the case study hotel is approximately 2%. However, an evaluation of various overall energy consumption components showed that the window films reduce the annual total cooling energy consumption by up to 35% along with a marginal 2% increase in the annual total heating energy consumption. They can also provide overall cost and CO2 emissions savings of up to 3%. Full article
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