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Special Issue "Advanced Innovative Solutions for Final Design in Terms of Energy Sustainability of Nearly/Net Zero Energy Buildings (nZEB)"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Domenico Mazzeo

Department of Mechanical, Energy and Management Engineering (DIMEG) - University of Calabria
Website | E-Mail
Interests: energy efficiency in buildings; energy saving in buildings; thermal energy storage; phase change materials; green roof; mathematical modeling of heat transfer; building simulation; renewable energy; solar plants; ground source heat pump system
Co-Guest Editor
Prof. Giuseppe Oliveti

Department of Mechanical, Energy and Management Engineering (DIMEG) - University of Calabria
Website | E-Mail
Interests: energy efficiency in buildings; dynamic thermal behavior of building walls; solar radiation modeling; solar plants; wind energy; infrared heat exchange in buildings; thermal energy storage; phase change materials; mathematical modelling of heat transfer; heating ventilation and air-conditioning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

EU Directives have reinforced both studies and research for the development of innovative technological solutions to improve building energy performance and to achieve a reduction in total energy consumption, with benefits in terms of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, as well as in economic terms.

In order to realize nearly/net Zero Energy Buildings (nZEB), sustainability has become a significant aspect and has been integrated into the design, construction and operation of buildings. For this reason, innovative sustainable technological solutions have been proposed to improve the thermal performance of the building envelope and to increase the use of energy from renewable sources. For example, they concern: (i) the stratigraphy of walls and the windows, through the use of phase change materials, of new silica aerogel-based insulating, of green vertical system and of green and cool roofs, etc.; (ii) the integration of systems that employ renewable heat sources, namely solar radiation, wind, geothermal, etc.

The aim of sustainable buildings is the ability to integrate and adapt buildings to environmental factors and climate conditions and convert them for space and comfort. The selection of proper sustainable building materials or technologies is an important issue in the building design. A correct selection should lead to high durability, energy efficiency, recyclability, maintainability, economic saving, and use of local materials to reduce the environmental impact of construction.

In this context, there is a lack of common understanding in the field and this Special Issue aims to collect contributions regarding the evaluation of the sustainability of nZEB, in terms of improvement of energy and thermal dynamic behavior of the building envelope, of thermal comfort in the indoor environment, of energy produced from renewable sources, of conventional fossil fuels savings, of decreasing of emissions of greenhouse gases, and of economic savings.

The studies are expected to address:

  • energy and dynamic thermal behavior of sustainable technologies/materials integrated or unintegrated in new, existing, renovated and historic buildings;

  • new simplified or articulated mathematical models implemented in new simulation tools or in existing ones;

  • definition of new metrics or parameters for the evaluation of the energy, environmental, and economic impact.

The studies could be addressed with mathematical model or by experimental investigation or preferably with both of them and should regard local contexts, with the support of case studies, or general procedures that could be applied to every technology and to every climate condition.

I believe that this Special Issue may help bridge the gap between sustainability and improvement of the energy efficiency of building.

Thank you for your contributions.

Dr. Domenico Mazzeo
Prof. Giuseppe Oliveti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Net Zero Energy Building

  • Sustainable innovative technologies

  • Wall stratigraphies

  • Dynamic thermal behavior

  • Renewable technologies

  • Energy performance

  • Environmental and economic impact

  • New metrics

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Study on Policy Marking of Passive Level Insulation Standards for Non-Residential Buildings in South Korea
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2554; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072554 (registering DOI)
Received: 5 July 2018 / Revised: 18 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
This study presented a methodology and process to establish a passive level for policy making of building energy in South Korea. A passive level in Korea specified in the 2017 Roadmap for non-residential buildings, which was 15 kWh/m2·year, was defined as
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This study presented a methodology and process to establish a passive level for policy making of building energy in South Korea. A passive level in Korea specified in the 2017 Roadmap for non-residential buildings, which was 15 kWh/m2·year, was defined as the heating energy requirement to strengthen the building energy saving design standards, which were typical building energy regulations in Korea. This study also presented insulation standards of roofs, floors, outer walls, and windows in Pyeongchang, Seoul, Gwangju, and Jeju, which were represented cities of four zones in Korea (Middle 1, Middle 2, Southern, and Jeju). Furthermore, the study results were extended to 66 cities around the nation to calculate the heating energy requirements and a severely cold region was added to existing three regions (Middle, Southern, and Jeju) to extend this to four regions (Middle 1, Middle 2, Southern, and Jeju). Afterwards, insulation standards for four represented regions were presented to derive a measure that minimized an energy loss through outer walls or windows in buildings. Finally, this study derived that a return of investment can be achieved in 10 years, which was determined through the comprehensive economic feasibility analysis due to strengthening insulation performances, proving the rationalization of the legal strengthening. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Net-Zero Energy Apartment in South Korea
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1564; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051564
Received: 8 March 2018 / Revised: 8 May 2018 / Accepted: 10 May 2018 / Published: 14 May 2018
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Abstract
In South Korea, buildings account for more than 25% of the nation’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, the government aims to make zero energy buildings mandatory from 2025, onward. For the housing sector, the government has recently built and operated a pilot net-zero
[...] Read more.
In South Korea, buildings account for more than 25% of the nation’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, the government aims to make zero energy buildings mandatory from 2025, onward. For the housing sector, the government has recently built and operated a pilot net-zero energy apartment (NZEA) and plans to expand it to several cities. This article attempts to obtain information about the consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for the NZEAs. To this end, households’ additional WTP for the NZEAs over a conventional apartment was investigated, applying the contingent valuation (CV) approach. The data on the WTP were gathered from a CV survey of 1000 interviewees and analyzed, employing a dichotomous choice question and the spike model, respectively. The mean value of the additional WTP is obtained as KRW 0.46 million (USD 424) per m2, which is statistically significant. This value corresponds to 17.0% of the conventional apartment price per m2 (KRW 2.76 million, USD 2436). It can be concluded that the households in South Korea place a significant value on a NZEA over a conventional apartment. In addition, we have investigated the characteristics of consumers which affect the probability that consumers accept additional payment of an amount of money for NZEA over a conventional apartment, finding that higher income earners, higher education, and male consumers have a higher probability. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Analysis of Heating and Cooling Loads of Electrochromic Glazing in High-Rise Residential Buildings in South Korea
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1121; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041121
Received: 22 February 2018 / Revised: 30 March 2018 / Accepted: 31 March 2018 / Published: 9 April 2018
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Abstract
This study compares the impact of the recently developed electrochromic glazing technology on load reduction by comparing it with the double-glazing and shading devices that are sold commercially for high-rise residential buildings in Korea. These buildings are similar to large office buildings in
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This study compares the impact of the recently developed electrochromic glazing technology on load reduction by comparing it with the double-glazing and shading devices that are sold commercially for high-rise residential buildings in Korea. These buildings are similar to large office buildings in terms of their high window-to-wall ratio. The energy consumption of such buildings was simulated using an analytical model of a high-rise residential building. The patterns between the heating and cooling loads were found to be similar to that of office buildings, in that the cooling load was considerably higher than the heating load. This study hypothesizes that the load reduction performance of electrochromic glazing with variable solar control and high solar radiation rejection is superior to that of existing double-glazing products and shading devices. This hypothesis was tested by analyzing the cooling and heating loads of buildings with different types of double glazings. Bleached electrochromic glazing exhibited lower transmittance than colored glass double glazing, low-e double glazing, and double glazing with a shading device, and is thus not effective in reducing heating load. Colored electrochromic glazing provided higher solar radiation rejection than colored glass double glazing and low-e double glazing, and thus is effective in reducing cooling load. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Phase Change Material (PCM) Application in a Modernized Korean Traditional House (Hanok)
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10040948
Received: 1 February 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 24 March 2018
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Abstract
Social and policy interest in the modernization and revitalization of the Korean traditional house (Hanok) has increased recently in Korea but its low thermal performance is one of its weaknesses. A feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of a
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Social and policy interest in the modernization and revitalization of the Korean traditional house (Hanok) has increased recently in Korea but its low thermal performance is one of its weaknesses. A feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of a Phase Change Material (PCM) in a modernized Hanok. The research method involved a test of the heating and cooling load reduction and Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) analysis for human comfort using an Esp-r simulation adopting multi variable PCM types as the building wall composite. The influence of PCMs on reducing the building energy load was assessed as a criterion for upgrading materials and infiltration to the passive house regulation. Compared to the base case, the heating and cooling load reduction ratio were as follows: Case 1 (old-Hanok), 10%; Case 2 (Korean Building Act), 21%; and Case 3 (passive house regulation), 53%. The optimal phase change temperatures of the PCMs were Case 1 (24–26 °C), Case 2 (23–25 °C) and Case 3 (24–26 °C). PMV analysis showed that the use of a PCM can narrow the comfort range and centralize the optimal point. Therefore, the following contents can be presented as the design and material guidelines. First, the optimal PCM temperature can vary according to the combination of materials and local climate. In addition, the infiltration and insulation should be verified and a certain portion of them should be secured. Finally, the addition of insulation to a passive house level should be considered actively using a PCM as a supplement for net zero energy building (nZEB). Full article
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Open AccessArticle Influence of Adaptive Comfort Models on Energy Improvement for Housing in Cold Areas
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 859; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030859
Received: 19 February 2018 / Revised: 10 March 2018 / Accepted: 13 March 2018 / Published: 18 March 2018
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Abstract
The evaluation of construction standards using adaptive thermal comfort models has a great impact on energy consumption. The analysis of a user’s climate adaptation must be one of the first steps in the search for nearly/net Zero Energy Buildings (nZEB). The goal of
[...] Read more.
The evaluation of construction standards using adaptive thermal comfort models has a great impact on energy consumption. The analysis of a user’s climate adaptation must be one of the first steps in the search for nearly/net Zero Energy Buildings (nZEB). The goal of this work is to analyze the standards recommended by the Chile’s Construction with Sustainability Criteria for the building of housing, applying the ASHRAE 55-2017 and EN 15251:2007 adaptive comfort models in social housing. The study produces concrete recommendations associated with construction strategies, to increase the number of hours the user finds themselves with acceptable thermal comfort levels, without repercussions for energy consumption. Sixteen parametric series were evaluated with a dynamic simulation of the most common prototype of social housing in the Bio-Bio Region. The study shows that thermal comfort conditions can be increased through a combination of improvement measures compared to the ECCS standard (Construction Standards with Sustainability Criteria): 27.52% in the case of applying EN 15251:2007 and 24.04% in the case of ASHRAE 55-2017. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Solar Heat Gain Reduction of Ventilated Double Skin Windows without a Shading Device
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010064
Received: 13 November 2017 / Revised: 26 December 2017 / Accepted: 27 December 2017 / Published: 28 December 2017
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Abstract
With global efforts to strengthen various energy-saving policies for buildings to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, in South Korea, new laws and regulations have been in force since May 2015 to install shading devices in public buildings and to include the solar heat gain
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With global efforts to strengthen various energy-saving policies for buildings to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, in South Korea, new laws and regulations have been in force since May 2015 to install shading devices in public buildings and to include the solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) reduction performance of shading devices in the evaluation of building performance. By making a ventilated air layer outer glass and inner glass to lower the temperatures of the air layer and glass surface, it is possible to reduce the amount of heat flowing into the building while maintaining the same level of light transmission as plain window systems. This study proposes a double-skin façade window with a 20 mm ventilated air cavity, and assumes that insolation inflow indoors would be reduced through ventilation in the air cavity. The artificial solar lab test results show that the SHGC can be lowered through ventilation by 28% to 52.9%. Additionally, in an outdoor test cell experiment, the results show that the mean temperature was 0.6 K and the peak temperature was 0.9 K lower with ventilation in the air cavity than that without ventilation in the air cavity. Full article
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