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Special Issue "Mass-Sensitive Sensors Based on Biomimetic Recognition"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Peter Lieberzeit

University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, Waehringer Strasse 38, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +43/1/4277-52341
Fax: +43 1 4277 9523
Interests: molecular imprinting; artificial receptors; real-life measurements; QCM; capacitive measurements; low-cost sensing; bioanalyte sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mass-sensitive sensing has one main advantage: mass is one of the most fundamental properties of any analyte. However, as a result of this advantage, mass-sensitive sensors also require suitable recognition materials to ensure selectivity. To this end, biomimetic approaches, including self-assembled monolayers, laterally cross-linked matrices, artificial membrane mimics, molecularly imprinted polymers, hybrid and composite materials, as well as aptamers and synthetic peptides/proteins, have generated increasing interest. Such strategies aim to implement biological functionalities in artificial, man-made matrices, so as to exploit the best of both worlds: these strategies aim to take advantage of biological materials’ outstanding recognition abilities and selectivity while using technology to impart upon these materials ruggedness and processability. This Special Issue of "Sensors" shall gather cutting-edge research concerning transducer development and optimization, as well as the design of novel artificial recognition materials. The issue will cover analytes ranging from chemical species to biomolecules, as well as larger entities ranging up to the size of whole cells. The issue welcomes both reviews and research papers, and aims to spotlight this interesting intersection of chemistry, biology, physics, electronics, and measuring science.

Prof. Dr. Peter Lieberzeit
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • mass-sensitive sensors
  • biomimetic recognition
  • artificial receptors
  • artificial antibodies
  • molecular imprinting
  • self-assembly
  • nanoparticles

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Proposition of a Silica Nanoparticle-Enhanced Hybrid Spin-Microcantilever Sensor Using Nonlinear Optics for Detection of DNA in Liquid
Sensors 2015, 15(10), 24848-24861; doi:10.3390/s151024848
Received: 1 July 2015 / Revised: 9 September 2015 / Accepted: 21 September 2015 / Published: 25 September 2015
PDF Full-text (20797 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We theoretically propose a method based on the combination of a nonlinear optical mass sensor using a hybrid spin-microcantilever and the nanoparticle-enhanced technique, to detect and monitor DNA mutations. The technique theoretically allows the mass of external particles (ssDNA) landing on the surface
[...] Read more.
We theoretically propose a method based on the combination of a nonlinear optical mass sensor using a hybrid spin-microcantilever and the nanoparticle-enhanced technique, to detect and monitor DNA mutations. The technique theoretically allows the mass of external particles (ssDNA) landing on the surface of a hybrid spin-microcantilever to be detected directly and accurately at 300 K with a mass responsivity 0.137 Hz/ag in situ in liquid. Moreover, combined with the nanoparticle-enhanced technique, even only one base pair mutation in the target DNA sequence can be identified in real time accurately, and the DNA hybridization reactions can be monitored quantitatively. Furthermore, in situ detection in liquid and measurement of the proposed nonlinear optical spin resonance spectra will minimize the experimental errors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mass-Sensitive Sensors Based on Biomimetic Recognition)
Open AccessArticle A Nano-Thin Film-Based Prototype QCM Sensor Array for Monitoring Human Breath and Respiratory Patterns
Sensors 2015, 15(8), 18834-18850; doi:10.3390/s150818834
Received: 29 June 2015 / Revised: 19 July 2015 / Accepted: 28 July 2015 / Published: 31 July 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1851 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor array was developed for multi-purpose human respiration assessment. The sensor system was designed to provide feedback for human respiration. Thorough optimization of measurement conditions: air flow, temperature in the QCM chamber, frequency measurement rate, and electrode position regarding
[...] Read more.
Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor array was developed for multi-purpose human respiration assessment. The sensor system was designed to provide feedback for human respiration. Thorough optimization of measurement conditions: air flow, temperature in the QCM chamber, frequency measurement rate, and electrode position regarding to the gas flow—was performed. As shown, acquisition of respiratory parameters (rate and respiratory pattern) could be achieved even with a single electrode used in the system. The prototype system contains eight available QCM channels that can be potentially used for selective responses to certain breath chemicals. At present, the prototype machine is ready for the assessment of respiratory functions in larger populations in order to gain statistical validation. To the best of our knowledge, the developed prototype is the only respiratory assessment system based on surface modified QCM sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mass-Sensitive Sensors Based on Biomimetic Recognition)
Open AccessArticle A Label-Free Immunosensor for Ultrasensitive Detection of Ketamine Based on Quartz Crystal Microbalance
Sensors 2015, 15(4), 8540-8549; doi:10.3390/s150408540
Received: 5 February 2015 / Revised: 18 March 2015 / Accepted: 30 March 2015 / Published: 13 April 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (706 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, we have developed a label-free immunosensor with the variation of resonance frequency (Δf) of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as readout signal for ultrasensitive detection of Ketamine (KT). An optimized strategy for immobilization of KT antibody on the surface of
[...] Read more.
In this study, we have developed a label-free immunosensor with the variation of resonance frequency (Δf) of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as readout signal for ultrasensitive detection of Ketamine (KT). An optimized strategy for immobilization of KT antibody on the surface of the QCM chip was implemented via the self-assembly modification of 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and then activated with 1-ethyl-3- (3-dimethylaminoprophl) carbodiimide and n-hydroxysuccinimide. The specific affinity between the antibody and the antigen ensured a selective response toward KT. The Δf linearly related to the concentration of KT in the range of 1 to 40 pg/mL, with a detection limit of 0.86 pg/mL (S/N = 3). The obtained immunosensor was applied to detect the KT in spiked human urine without any pretreatment but dilution with recoveries from 91.8% to 108%. The developed sensor is promising to perform the portable or on-spot KT detection in clinic or forensic cases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mass-Sensitive Sensors Based on Biomimetic Recognition)
Open AccessArticle Corroles-Porphyrins: A Teamwork for Gas Sensor Arrays
Sensors 2015, 15(4), 8121-8130; doi:10.3390/s150408121
Received: 2 March 2015 / Revised: 30 March 2015 / Accepted: 2 April 2015 / Published: 8 April 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (259 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Porphyrins provide an excellent material for chemical sensors, and they have been used for sensing species both in air and solution. In the gas phase, the broad selectivity of porphyrins is largely dependant on molecular features, such as the metal ion complexed at
[...] Read more.
Porphyrins provide an excellent material for chemical sensors, and they have been used for sensing species both in air and solution. In the gas phase, the broad selectivity of porphyrins is largely dependant on molecular features, such as the metal ion complexed at the core of the aromatic ring and the peripheral substituents. Although these features have been largely exploited to design gas sensor arrays, so far, little attention has been devoted to modify the sensing properties of these macrocycles by variation of the molecular aromatic ring. In this paper, the gas sensing properties of a porphyrin analog, the corrole, are studied in comparison with those of the parent porphyrin. Results show that changes in the aromatic ring have important consequences on the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensors and that porphyrins and corroles can positively cooperate to enhance the performance of sensor arrays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mass-Sensitive Sensors Based on Biomimetic Recognition)
Open AccessArticle Study of the Interaction of Trastuzumab and SKOV3 Epithelial Cancer Cells Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensor
Sensors 2015, 15(3), 5884-5894; doi:10.3390/s150305884
Received: 15 December 2014 / Revised: 31 December 2014 / Accepted: 2 March 2015 / Published: 10 March 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1289 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Analytical methods founded upon whole cell-based assays are of importance in early stage drug development and in fundamental studies of biomolecular recognition. Here we have studied the binding of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on human
[...] Read more.
Analytical methods founded upon whole cell-based assays are of importance in early stage drug development and in fundamental studies of biomolecular recognition. Here we have studied the binding of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on human ovary adenocarcinoma epithelial cancer cells (SKOV3) using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technology. An optimized procedure for immobilizing the cells on the chip surface was established with respect to fixation procedure and seeding density. Trastuzumab binding to the cell decorated sensor surface was studied, revealing a mean dissociation constant, KD, value of 7 ± 1 nM (standard error of the mean). This study provides a new perspective on the affinity of the antibody-receptor complex presented a more natural context compared to purified receptors. These results demonstrate the potential for using whole cell-based QCM assay in drug development, the screening of HER2 selective antibody-based drug candidates, and for the study of biomolecular recognition. This real time, label free approach for studying interactions with target receptors present in their natural environment afforded sensitive and detailed kinetic information about the binding of the analyte to the target. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mass-Sensitive Sensors Based on Biomimetic Recognition)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Electropolymerized Molecularly Imprinted Polypyrrole Film for Sensing of Clofibric Acid
Sensors 2015, 15(3), 4870-4889; doi:10.3390/s150304870
Received: 18 January 2015 / Revised: 15 February 2015 / Accepted: 16 February 2015 / Published: 26 February 2015
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1495 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Piezoelectric quartz crystals and analogous gold substrates were electrochemically coated with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole films for pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) of clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate. Cyclic voltammetry data obtained during polymerization and deposited weight estimations revealed a decrease of the polymerization
[...] Read more.
Piezoelectric quartz crystals and analogous gold substrates were electrochemically coated with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole films for pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) of clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate. Cyclic voltammetry data obtained during polymerization and deposited weight estimations revealed a decrease of the polymerization rate with increasing clofibric acid concentration. XPS measurements indicated that clofibric acid could be removed after imprinting with an aqueous ethanol solution, which was further optimized by using PAD. Zeta potential and contact angle measurements revealed differences between molecularly imprinted (MIP) and non-imprinted polymer (NIP) layers. Binding experiments with clofibric acid and other substances showed a pronounced selectivity of the MIP for clofibric acid vs. carbamazepine, but the response of MIP and NIP to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was higher than that for clofibric acid. A smooth surface, revealed by AFM measurements, with roughness of 6–8 nm for imprinted and non-imprinted layers, might be a reason for an excessively low density of specific binding sites for clofibric acid. Furthermore, the decreased polymerization rate in the presence of clofibric acid might not result in well-defined polymer structures, which could be the reason for the lower sensitivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mass-Sensitive Sensors Based on Biomimetic Recognition)
Open AccessArticle Biomimetic Receptors for Bioanalyte Detection by Quartz Crystal Microbalances — From Molecules to Cells
Sensors 2014, 14(12), 23419-23438; doi:10.3390/s141223419
Received: 14 September 2014 / Revised: 17 November 2014 / Accepted: 27 November 2014 / Published: 5 December 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (5098 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A universal label-free detection of bioanalytes can be performed with biomimetic quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) coatings prepared by imprinting strategies. Bulk imprinting was used to detect the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) known as estradiols. The estrogen 17β-estradiol is one of the most potent
[...] Read more.
A universal label-free detection of bioanalytes can be performed with biomimetic quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) coatings prepared by imprinting strategies. Bulk imprinting was used to detect the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) known as estradiols. The estrogen 17β-estradiol is one of the most potent EDCs, even at very low concentrations. A highly sensitive, selective and robust QCM sensor was fabricated for real time monitoring of 17β-estradiol in water samples by using molecular imprinted polyurethane. Optimization of porogen (pyrene) and cross-linker (phloroglucinol) levels leads to improved sensitivity, selectivity and response time of the estradiol sensor. Surface imprinting of polyurethane as sensor coating also allowed us to generate interaction sites for the selective recognition of bacteria, even in a very complex mixture of interfering compounds, while they were growing from their spores in nutrient solution. A double molecular imprinting approach was followed to transfer the geometrical features of natural bacteria onto the synthetic polymer to generate biomimetic bacteria. The use of biomimetic bacteria as template makes it possible to prepare multiple sensor coatings with similar sensitivity and selectivity. Thus, cell typing, e.g., differentiation of bacteria strains, bacteria growth profile and extent of their nutrition, can be monitored by biomimetic mass sensors. Obviously, this leads to controlled cell growth in bioreactors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mass-Sensitive Sensors Based on Biomimetic Recognition)
Figures

Open AccessArticle New Approach to a Practical Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensor Utilizing an Inkjet Printing System
Sensors 2014, 14(11), 20468-20479; doi:10.3390/s141120468
Received: 14 September 2014 / Revised: 20 October 2014 / Accepted: 27 October 2014 / Published: 30 October 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2471 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present work demonstrates a valuable approach to developing quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor units inexpensively for reliable determination of analytes. This QCM sensor unit is constructed by inkjet printing equipment utilizing background noise removal techniques. Inkjet printing equipment was chosen as an
[...] Read more.
The present work demonstrates a valuable approach to developing quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor units inexpensively for reliable determination of analytes. This QCM sensor unit is constructed by inkjet printing equipment utilizing background noise removal techniques. Inkjet printing equipment was chosen as an alternative to an injection pump in conventional flow-mode systems to facilitate the commercial applicability of these practical devices. The results demonstrate minimization of fluctuations from external influences, determination of antigen-antibody interactions in an inkjet deposition, and quantification of C-reactive protein in the range of 50–1000 ng∙mL−1. We thus demonstrate a marketable application of an inexpensive and easily available QCM sensor system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mass-Sensitive Sensors Based on Biomimetic Recognition)

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