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Special Issue "Recent Advances in Biosensors Based Screen Printed Platforms"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jesus Iniesta Valcarcel

Physical Chemistry Department and Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Alicante, 03690 San Vicente del Raspeig, Alicante, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34-965909850
Interests: adsorption of proteins and bioelectrocatalysis; electrochemistry of carbonaceous materials; sensors and biosensors; screen printed carbon electrodes; electrochemistry of ionic liquids; nanoporous carbons in fuel cells; environemntal applications
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Craig E. Banks

Faculty of Science and Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan University, John Dalton Building, Chester St., Manchester, M1 5GD, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: graphene electrochemistry; intelligent electrochemical sensing; electrochemical sensors; nano composites; sono-electrochemistry; drug sensors; screen-printing and related; applications in forensic science viz forensic electrochemistry; nanoparticle synthesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cost-effective, mass production of single or multi-analyte devices, miniaturization, and detection and quantification in situ and real time are some of the challenges that biosensor-based screen-printing platforms are facing on for the introduction and settlement on the market. Biosensor-based screen-printed platforms offer wider potentialities in terms of accuracy, rapidness, portability, and robustness for the monitoring and determination of a plurality of analytes within distinct samples. Environmental and food control, clinical and sport diagnosis open up large niches and opportunities for the commercialization of the biosensors based screen printed platforms. Of special interest is the miniaturization and easy handling of biosensors for point-of-care applications. This Special Issue is devoted to reviews, research articles or short communications on the most relevant advances in fundamentals and applications of “Biosensor-Based Screen-Printed Platform”.

Prof. Dr. Jesus Iniesta Valcárcel
Prof. Dr. Craig E Banks
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • screen printing biosensors
  • paper based electrochemical devices.
  • miniaturization and multi-analysis.
  • micro and nanomaterials.
  • clinical diagnosis.
  • food and environmental applications.
  • composite materials.
  • in situ and real time applications
  • electrochemical biosensors.
  • validation of biosensors
  • novel strategies for cost-effective and mass production of screen printing biosensors

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Reagent-Less and Robust Biosensor for Direct Determination of Lactate in Food Samples
Sensors 2017, 17(1), 144; doi:10.3390/s17010144
Received: 28 September 2016 / Revised: 20 December 2016 / Accepted: 11 January 2017 / Published: 13 January 2017
PDF Full-text (1613 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Lactic acid is a relevant analyte in the food industry, since it affects the flavor, freshness, and storage quality of several products, such as milk and dairy products, juices, or wines. It is the product of lactose or malo-lactic fermentation. In this work,
[...] Read more.
Lactic acid is a relevant analyte in the food industry, since it affects the flavor, freshness, and storage quality of several products, such as milk and dairy products, juices, or wines. It is the product of lactose or malo-lactic fermentation. In this work, we developed a lactate biosensor based on the immobilization of lactate oxidase (LOx) onto N,N′-Bis(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene) -1,2-diaminobenzene Schiff base tetradentate ligand-modified gold nanoparticles (3,4DHS–AuNPs) deposited onto screen-printed carbon electrodes, which exhibit a potent electrocatalytic effect towards hydrogen peroxide oxidation/reduction. 3,4DHS–AuNPs were synthesized within a unique reaction step, in which 3,4DHS acts as reducing/capping/modifier agent for the generation of stable colloidal suspensions of Schiff base ligand–AuNPs assemblies of controlled size. The ligand—in addition to its reduction action—provides a robust coating to gold nanoparticles and a catalytic function. Lactate oxidase (LOx) catalyzes the conversion of l-lactate to pyruvate in the presence of oxygen, producing hydrogen peroxide, which is catalytically oxidized at 3,4DHS–AuNPs modified screen-printed carbon electrodes at +0.2 V. The measured electrocatalytic current is directly proportional to the concentration of peroxide, which is related to the amount of lactate present in the sample. The developed biosensor shows a detection limit of 2.6 μM lactate and a sensitivity of 5.1 ± 0.1 μA·mM−1. The utility of the device has been demonstrated by the determination of the lactate content in different matrixes (white wine, beer, and yogurt). The obtained results compare well to those obtained using a standard enzymatic-spectrophotometric assay kit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biosensors Based Screen Printed Platforms)
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Open AccessArticle Organophosphorous Pesticide Detection in Olive Oil by Using a Miniaturized, Easy-to-Use, and Cost-Effective Biosensor Combined with QuEChERS for Sample Clean-Up
Sensors 2017, 17(1), 34; doi:10.3390/s17010034
Received: 4 November 2016 / Revised: 13 December 2016 / Accepted: 20 December 2016 / Published: 24 December 2016
PDF Full-text (1687 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Herein, we report a portable electrochemical biosensor based on butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) immobilized on carbon black (CB)-modified screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) for the detection of organophosphorous pesticides in olive oil. The BChE/CB-SPE biosensor was developed to detect paraoxon in standard solutions as well as in
[...] Read more.
Herein, we report a portable electrochemical biosensor based on butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) immobilized on carbon black (CB)-modified screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) for the detection of organophosphorous pesticides in olive oil. The BChE/CB-SPE biosensor was developed to detect paraoxon in standard solutions as well as in olive oil samples previously treated with the QuEChERS method to extract pesticides from the whole fatty matrix. The biosensor shows a linear concentration range of between 20 and 100 ppb for paraoxon both in standard solutions (phosphate buffer 0.05 M) and in olive oil extracts, with a detection limit of 6 ppb in olive oil extract, corresponding to 10% of inhibition. The accuracy of this biosensor in olive oil samples was assessed with olive oil spiked with paraoxon, obtaining satisfactory recovery values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biosensors Based Screen Printed Platforms)
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Open AccessArticle Electrochemical Behavior and Determination of Chlorogenic Acid Based on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Modified Screen-Printed Electrode
Sensors 2016, 16(11), 1797; doi:10.3390/s16111797
Received: 12 July 2016 / Revised: 6 September 2016 / Accepted: 12 October 2016 / Published: 27 October 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (9820 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, the multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified screen-printed electrode (MWCNTs/SPE) was prepared and the MWCNTs/SPE was employed for the electrochemical determination of the antioxidant substance chlorogenic acids (CGAs). A pair of well-defined redox peaks of CGA was observed at the MWCNTs/SPE in
[...] Read more.
In this paper, the multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified screen-printed electrode (MWCNTs/SPE) was prepared and the MWCNTs/SPE was employed for the electrochemical determination of the antioxidant substance chlorogenic acids (CGAs). A pair of well-defined redox peaks of CGA was observed at the MWCNTs/SPE in 0.10 mol/L acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer (pH 6.2) and the electrode process was adsorption-controlled. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) methods for the determination of CGA were proposed based on the MWCNTs/SPE. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method exhibited linear ranges from 0.17 to 15.8 µg/mL, and the linear regression equation was Ipa (µA) = 4.1993 C (×10−5 mol/L) + 1.1039 (r = 0.9976) and the detection limit for CGA could reach 0.12 µg/mL. The recovery of matrine was 94.74%–106.65% (RSD = 2.92%) in coffee beans. The proposed method is quick, sensitive, reliable, and can be used for the determination of CGA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biosensors Based Screen Printed Platforms)
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Open AccessArticle A Disposable Microfluidic Device with a Screen Printed Electrode for Mimicking Phase II Metabolism
Sensors 2016, 16(9), 1418; doi:10.3390/s16091418
Received: 9 May 2016 / Revised: 23 August 2016 / Accepted: 25 August 2016 / Published: 2 September 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4125 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Human metabolism is investigated using several in vitro methods. However, the current methodologies are often expensive, tedious and complicated. Over the last decade, the combination of electrochemistry (EC) with mass spectrometry (MS) has a simpler and a cheaper alternative to mimic the human
[...] Read more.
Human metabolism is investigated using several in vitro methods. However, the current methodologies are often expensive, tedious and complicated. Over the last decade, the combination of electrochemistry (EC) with mass spectrometry (MS) has a simpler and a cheaper alternative to mimic the human metabolism. This paper describes the development of a disposable microfluidic device with a screen-printed electrode (SPE) for monitoring phase II GSH reactions. The proposed chip has the potential to be used as a primary screening tool, thus complementing the current in vitro methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biosensors Based Screen Printed Platforms)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Electrochemical Affinity Biosensors Based on Disposable Screen-Printed Electrodes for Detection of Food Allergens
Sensors 2016, 16(11), 1863; doi:10.3390/s16111863
Received: 21 September 2016 / Revised: 24 October 2016 / Accepted: 31 October 2016 / Published: 5 November 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (3692 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Food allergens are proteins from nuts and tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, soy, eggs or milk which trigger severe adverse reactions in the human body, involving IgE-type antibodies. Sensitive detection of allergens in a large variety of food matrices has become increasingly important
[...] Read more.
Food allergens are proteins from nuts and tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, soy, eggs or milk which trigger severe adverse reactions in the human body, involving IgE-type antibodies. Sensitive detection of allergens in a large variety of food matrices has become increasingly important considering the emergence of functional foods and new food manufacturing technologies. For example, proteins such as casein from milk or lysozyme and ovalbumin from eggs are sometimes used as fining agents in the wine industry. Nonetheless, allergen detection in processed foods is a challenging endeavor, as allergen proteins are degraded during food processing steps involving heating or fermentation. Detection of food allergens was primarily achieved via Enzyme-Linked Immuno Assay (ELISA) or by chromatographic methods. With the advent of biosensors, electrochemical affinity-based biosensors such as those incorporating antibodies and aptamers as biorecognition elements were also reported in the literature. In this review paper, we highlight the success achieved in the design of electrochemical affinity biosensors based on disposable screen-printed electrodes towards detection of protein allergens. We will discuss the analytical figures of merit for various disposable screen-printed affinity sensors in relation to methodologies employed for immobilization of bioreceptors on transducer surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biosensors Based Screen Printed Platforms)
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Open AccessReview Magnetic Particles Coupled to Disposable Screen Printed Transducers for Electrochemical Biosensing
Sensors 2016, 16(10), 1585; doi:10.3390/s16101585
Received: 2 September 2016 / Revised: 20 September 2016 / Accepted: 22 September 2016 / Published: 25 September 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2003 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Ultrasensitive biosensing is currently a growing demand that has led to the development of numerous strategies for signal amplification. In this context, the unique properties of magnetic particles; both of nano- and micro-size dimensions; have proved to be promising materials to be coupled
[...] Read more.
Ultrasensitive biosensing is currently a growing demand that has led to the development of numerous strategies for signal amplification. In this context, the unique properties of magnetic particles; both of nano- and micro-size dimensions; have proved to be promising materials to be coupled with disposable electrodes for the design of cost-effective electrochemical affinity biosensing platforms. This review addresses, through discussion of selected examples, the way that nano- and micro-magnetic particles (MNPs and MMPs; respectively) have contributed significantly to the development of electrochemical affinity biosensors, including immuno-, DNA, aptamer and other affinity modes. Different aspects such as type of magnetic particles, assay formats, detection techniques, sensitivity, applicability and other relevant characteristics are discussed. Research opportunities and future development trends in this field are also considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biosensors Based Screen Printed Platforms)
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