Special Issue "Smart Carbon Materials in Catalysis"

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Craig E. Banks

Faculty of Science and Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan University, John Dalton Building, Chester St., Manchester, M1 5GD, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: graphene electrochemistry; intelligent electrochemical sensing; electrochemical sensors; nano composites; sono-electrochemistry; drug sensors; screen-printing and related; applications in forensic science viz forensic electrochemistry; nanoparticle synthesis
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jesus Iniesta Valcarcel

Physical Chemistry Department and Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Alicante, 03690 San Vicente del Raspeig, Alicante, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34-965909850
Interests: adsorption of proteins and bioelectrocatalysis; electrochemistry of carbonaceous materials; sensors and biosensors; screen printed carbon electrodes; electrochemistry of ionic liquids; nanoporous carbons in fuel cells; environemntal applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Catalytic processes are mostly incorporated in a majority of industrial processes, so catalysts synthesis characterization and performance are crucial steps for the amelioration of the rate control, selectivity, and specificity of the chemical reactions. Carbon-based supports are being introduced nowadays as appropriate materials support of catalysts compared to the most popular Al2O3 and/or SiO2, for its interesting properties, such as control of pore size and pore size distribution, nanostructural control, and surface chemistry tailoring. Nonetheless, the intrinsic properties of carbon-based materials play themselves a wide number of catalytic processes beyond supporting materials. Thus, carbon-based materials as catalysts can exhibit a plethora of applications in fields like photocatalysis, electrocatalysis, and photoelectrocatalysis, among many others, by simply tailoring their textural, structural and surface chemistry properties. Synthetic and electrosynthetic processes, energy driven reactions, sensing and environment remediation take advantages of the proper design and performance of carbon based catalysts. The main aim of this Special Issue is to present the most relevant and recent insights in the field of carbon based catalytic materials aiming mainly at the fundamental and applicable aspects by seeking for the influence of physical–chemical properties of carbon materials on rate and performance in chemical kinetics.

We look forward to your submission.

Prof. Dr. Craig E. Banks
Prof. Dr. Jesus Iniesta Valcarcel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. C is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbon based supports
  • electrocatalysis
  • catalysis beyong electrochemistry
  • photoelectrocatalysis
  • photocatalysis
  • enzymatic catalysis
  • nanoreactors and scale up process
  • industrial applications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Nitrogen-Doped Activated Carbon as Metal-Free Catalysts Having Various Functions
C 2017, 3(4), 31; doi:10.3390/c3040031
Received: 23 September 2017 / Revised: 12 October 2017 / Accepted: 16 October 2017 / Published: 18 October 2017
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Abstract
Nitrogen-doped carbon materials have been gaining increasing interest as metal-free catalysts. In this article, the authors have briefly introduced their recent studies on the utilization of nitrogen-doped activated carbon (N-AC) for several organic synthesis reactions, which include base catalyzed reactions of Knoevenagel condensation
[...] Read more.
Nitrogen-doped carbon materials have been gaining increasing interest as metal-free catalysts. In this article, the authors have briefly introduced their recent studies on the utilization of nitrogen-doped activated carbon (N-AC) for several organic synthesis reactions, which include base catalyzed reactions of Knoevenagel condensation and transesterification, aerobic oxidation of xanthene and alcohols, and transfer hydrogenation of nitrobenzene, 3-nitrostyrene, styrene, and phenylacetylene with hydrazine. Doped-nitrogen species existed on the AC surface in different structures. For example, pyridine-type nitrogen species appear to be involved in the active sites for Knoevenagel condensation and for the oxidation of xanthene, while graphite-type nitrogen species appear to be involved for the oxidation of alcohols. Being different from these reactions, both surface nitrogen and oxygen species are involved in the active sites for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene. N-AC was practically inactive for the transfer hydrogenation of vinyl and ethynyl groups, but it can catalyze those hydrogenation reactions assisted by co-existing nitrobenzene. Comparison of N-AC with conventional catalysts shows that N-AC can alternate with conventional solid base catalysts and supported metal catalysts for the Knoevenagel condensation and oxidation reactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Carbon Materials in Catalysis)
Figures

Open AccessReview Fullerenes in Electrochemical Catalytic and Affinity Biosensing: A Review
C 2017, 3(3), 21; doi:10.3390/c3030021
Received: 13 June 2017 / Revised: 23 June 2017 / Accepted: 26 June 2017 / Published: 28 June 2017
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Abstract
Nanotechnology is becoming increasingly important in the field of (bio)sensors. The performance and sensitivity of electrochemical biosensors can be greatly improved by the integration of nanomaterials into their construction. In this sense, carbon nanomaterials have been widely used for preparation of biosensors due
[...] Read more.
Nanotechnology is becoming increasingly important in the field of (bio)sensors. The performance and sensitivity of electrochemical biosensors can be greatly improved by the integration of nanomaterials into their construction. In this sense, carbon nanomaterials have been widely used for preparation of biosensors due to their ability to enhance electron-transfer kinetics, high surface-to-volume ratios, and biocompatibility. Fullerenes are a very promising family of carbon nanomaterials and have attracted great interest in recent years in the design of novel biosensing systems due to fullerenes’ exceptional properties. These include multiple redox states, stability in many redox forms, easy functionalization and signal mediation. This paper outlines the state-of-the-art and future directions in the use and functionalization of fullerene-C60 and its derivatives, both as electrode modifiers and advanced labels in electrochemical catalytic and affinity biosensors through selected applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Carbon Materials in Catalysis)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Copper-doped nanoporous carbons obtained from natural precursors towards the electrocatalytic oxidation of alcohols under alkaline medium

Author: Leticia García-Cruz, Conchi O. Ania, Teresa J. Bandosz, Mykola Serudich, Vicente Montiel, Jesús Iniesta

Title: The role of structural and surface properties of phosphorylated carbon materials on the catalytic performance in dehydration reactions
Author: Sebastiano Campisi
Abstract: Phosphorylated carbons have been reported to be effective catalysts in dehydration reactions for biomass valorisation. The amount and the nature of P and O groups are a key parameter affecting the catalytic performances of functionalized materials. Herein, we investigate the role of structural and surface properties of carbon based materials in determining the number and the distribution of P-functionalities. Various carbon-based materials, namely activated carbon (AC), ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC), graphite (Graph) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with different graphitization degree, have been functionalized through treatment with a H3PO4-HNO3 mixture at 150°C. Surface and structural properties of bare and functionalized materials have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman Spectroscopy and Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) experiments. The catalytic behaviour of phosphorylated carbon materials has been evaluated in the selective dehydration of fructose to HMF in order to elucidate structure-activity relationships.

Title: Electrostatic Adsorption of Platinum on Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers
Author: John Regalbuto, Ritubarna Banerjee
Abstract: Strong Electrostatic Adsorption (SEA) has been demonstrated as a simple, scientific method to prepare well dispersed Pt nanoparticles over typical forms of carbon: activated, black, and graphitic carbons. Many varieties of specialty carbons have been invented in the last few decades including multi-walled nanotubes, nanofibers, graphene nanoplatelets, etc. In this work we explore whether SEA can be applied to these specialty carbons for the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles.Over a number of oxidized and unoxidized multiwalled nanotubes and nanofibers the point of zero charge (PZC) was measured and the uptake of anionic Pt complexes (Pt hexachloride, [PtCl6]2-, and cationic Pt complexes (platinum tetraammine, [Pt(NH3)4]2+) as functions of final pH were surveyed. Pt nanoparticles on the various supports were synthesized at the optimal pH and were characterized by XRD and STEM. The specialty carbons displayed volcano-shaped uptake curves typical of electrostatic adsorption for both Pt anions at low pH and Pt cations at high pH. However, the regimes of uptake often did not correspond to the measured PZC. It was seen that the PZC of many of the carbons could be changed with washing, and so was likely affected by residual impurities of the manufacturing process. This renders the measured PZC of these specialty carbons unreliable for predicting anion and cation uptake. On the other hand, the anion and cation uptake curves provide an “effective” PZC and do indicate the optimal pH for the effective synthesis of ultrasmall nanoparticles.

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