Special Issue "Plant Light Signalling"

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A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Beronda Montgomery

MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1-517-353-9168
Interests: light; photomorphogenesis; photoreceptors; signaling; growth and development; arabidopsis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

External light conditions impact growth and development throughout the life cycle of plants. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of light signalling and light-mediated signal transduction in recent years. These advances have been spurred by molecular genetic approaches and innovative tools available for model plant and prokaryotic systems. There have been significant advances in the identification of distinct plant photoreceptors and elucidation of the roles of associated effectors, whose activities direct light-dependent differences in gene expression, biochemistry and metabolism, hormone signaling and, ultimately, phenotypic responses. The complex signaling networks regulated by light and plant photoreceptors continue to be unraveled. This issue will focus on recent advances in photoreceptor signaling pathways, light-hormone interactions, and new insights into photobiology spanning the molecular, cellular, tissue-/organ-specific, intercellular and whole organism levels.

Dr. Beronda Montgomery
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • photomorphogenesis
  • photoreceptors
  • photobiology
  • light signaling
  • growth and development

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Accumulation of TIP2;2 Aquaporin during Dark Adaptation Is Partially PhyA Dependent in Roots of Arabidopsis Seedlings
Plants 2014, 3(1), 177-195; doi:10.3390/plants3010177
Received: 15 November 2013 / Revised: 2 February 2014 / Accepted: 21 February 2014 / Published: 5 March 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1230 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Light regulates the expression and function of aquaporins, which are involved in water and solute transport. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mRNA levels of one of the aquaporin genes, TIP2;2, increase during dark adaptation and decrease under far-red light illumination, but the effects
[...] Read more.
Light regulates the expression and function of aquaporins, which are involved in water and solute transport. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mRNA levels of one of the aquaporin genes, TIP2;2, increase during dark adaptation and decrease under far-red light illumination, but the effects of light at the protein level and on the mechanism of light regulation remain unknown. Numerous studies have described the light regulation of aquaporin genes, but none have identified the regulatory mechanisms behind this regulation via specific photoreceptor signaling. In this paper, we focus on the role of phytochrome A (phyA) signaling in the regulation of the TIP2;2 protein. We generated Arabidopsis transgenic plants expressing a TIP2;2-GFP fusion protein driven by its own promoter, and showed several differences in TIP2;2 behavior between wild type and the phyA mutant. Fluorescence of TIP2;2-GFP protein in the endodermis of roots in the wild-type seedlings increased during dark adaptation, but not in the phyA mutant. The amount of the TIP2;2-GFP protein in wild-type seedlings decreased rapidly under far-red light illumination, and a delay in reduction of TIP2;2-GFP was observed in the phyA mutant. Our results imply that phyA, cooperating with other photoreceptors, modulates the level of TIP2;2 in Arabidopsis roots. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Light Signalling)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Light and Wounding on Jasmonates in Rice phyAphyC Mutants
Plants 2014, 3(1), 143-159; doi:10.3390/plants3010143
Received: 18 November 2013 / Revised: 18 February 2014 / Accepted: 24 February 2014 / Published: 3 March 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (296 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Jasmonates (JA) are lipid-derived plant hormones. They have been shown to be important regulators of photomorphogenesis, a developmental program in plants, which is activated by light through different red and blue light sensitive photoreceptors. In rice, inhibition of coleoptile growth by light is
[...] Read more.
Jasmonates (JA) are lipid-derived plant hormones. They have been shown to be important regulators of photomorphogenesis, a developmental program in plants, which is activated by light through different red and blue light sensitive photoreceptors. In rice, inhibition of coleoptile growth by light is a central event in photomorphogenesis. This growth inhibition is impaired, when jasmonate biosynthesis is knocked out. Previously, we found that JASMONATE RESISTANT 1 (OsJAR1) transcripts were not induced in the phytochrome (phy) mutant phyAphyC. Therefore, in the current study we investigated the regulation of JA and its highly bioactive derivative (+)-7-iso-jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile), as well as the transcriptional regulation of several JA-dependent genes both in wild type and phyAphyC mutant. JA and JA-Ile levels increased in the mutant seedlings in response to blue light. However, in phyAphyC mutant leaves, which were continuously wounded, JA and JA-Ile levels were lower compared to those in the wild type. Hence, the mutation of phyA and phyC has differential effects on jasmonate levels depending on the tissue and developmental stage. Our results suggest that the contribution of JA-Ile to signaling during photomorphogenesis of rice is minor, as coleoptile phenotypes of phyAphyC mutants resemble those of jasmonate-deficient mutants despite the fact that induction by blue light leads to higher levels of JA-Ile compared to the wild type. We postulate that phyA and phyC could control the activity of specific enzymes metabolizing JA to active derivatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Light Signalling)
Open AccessArticle Regulation by Light of Chemotaxis to Nitrite during the Sexual Life Cycle in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Plants 2014, 3(1), 113-127; doi:10.3390/plants3010113
Received: 4 November 2013 / Revised: 24 January 2014 / Accepted: 8 February 2014 / Published: 26 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (736 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nitrite plays an important role in the nitrogen metabolism of most cells, including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We have shown that vegetative cells of C. reinhardtii are attracted by nitrite. The Nia1nit2 mutant with defects in genes encoding the nitrate reductase and regulatory
[...] Read more.
Nitrite plays an important role in the nitrogen metabolism of most cells, including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We have shown that vegetative cells of C. reinhardtii are attracted by nitrite. The Nia1nit2 mutant with defects in genes encoding the nitrate reductase and regulatory protein NIT2 respectively was found to exhibit normal chemotaxis to nitrite. The data suggest that chemotaxis events appear to be specific and independent of those involved in nitrate assimilation. Unlike vegetative cells and noncompetent pregametes, mature gametes did not show chemotaxis to nitrite. Just like gamete formation, the change in chemotaxis mode is controlled by the sequential action of two environmental cues, removal of nitrogen from the medium and light. Comparative analysis of wild-type and RNAi strains with reduced level of phototropin has indicated that switch-off of chemotaxis towards nitrite is dependent on phototropin. The studies revealed individual elements of the phototropin-dependent signal transduction pathway involved in the blue-light-controlled change in chemotaxis mode of C. reinhardtii during gamete formation: three protein kinases, one operating against signal flux and two that promote signal transduction. We have proposed a working model for the signaling pathway by which blue light controls chemotaxis towards attractants, which are nitrogen sources, during pregamete-to-gamete conversion of C. reinhardtii. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Light Signalling)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Increasing Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-Bisphosphate Biosynthesis Affects Basal Signaling and Chloroplast Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana
Plants 2014, 3(1), 27-57; doi:10.3390/plants3010027
Received: 4 November 2013 / Revised: 18 December 2013 / Accepted: 20 December 2013 / Published: 3 January 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1315 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
One challenge in studying the second messenger inositol(1,4,5)-trisphosphate (InsP3) is that it is present in very low amounts and increases only transiently in response to stimuli. To identify events downstream of InsP3, we generated transgenic plants constitutively expressing the
[...] Read more.
One challenge in studying the second messenger inositol(1,4,5)-trisphosphate (InsP3) is that it is present in very low amounts and increases only transiently in response to stimuli. To identify events downstream of InsP3, we generated transgenic plants constitutively expressing the high specific activity, human phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase Iα (HsPIPKIα). PIP5K is the enzyme that synthesizes phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2); this reaction is flux limiting in InsP3 biosynthesis in plants. Plasma membranes from transgenic Arabidopsis expressing HsPIPKIα had 2–3 fold higher PIP5K specific activity, and basal InsP3 levels in seedlings and leaves were >2-fold higher than wild type. Although there was no significant difference in photosynthetic electron transport, HsPIPKIα plants had significantly higher starch (2–4 fold) and 20% higher anthocyanin compared to controls. Starch content was higher both during the day and at the end of dark period. In addition, transcripts of genes involved in starch metabolism such as SEX1 (glucan water dikinase) and SEX4 (phosphoglucan phosphatase), DBE (debranching enzyme), MEX1 (maltose transporter), APL3 (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) and glucose-6-phosphate transporter (Glc6PT) were up-regulated in the HsPIPKIα plants. Our results reveal that increasing the phosphoinositide (PI) pathway affects chloroplast carbon metabolism and suggest that InsP3 is one component of an inter-organelle signaling network regulating chloroplast metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Light Signalling)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Light Signaling in Bud Outgrowth and Branching in Plants
Plants 2014, 3(2), 223-250; doi:10.3390/plants3020223
Received: 18 November 2013 / Revised: 21 March 2014 / Accepted: 25 March 2014 / Published: 23 April 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (881 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Branching determines the final shape of plants, which influences adaptation, survival and the visual quality of many species. It is an intricate process that includes bud outgrowth and shoot extension, and these in turn respond to environmental cues and light conditions. Light is
[...] Read more.
Branching determines the final shape of plants, which influences adaptation, survival and the visual quality of many species. It is an intricate process that includes bud outgrowth and shoot extension, and these in turn respond to environmental cues and light conditions. Light is a powerful environmental factor that impacts multiple processes throughout plant life. The molecular basis of the perception and transduction of the light signal within buds is poorly understood and undoubtedly requires to be further unravelled. This review is based on current knowledge on bud outgrowth-related mechanisms and light-mediated regulation of many physiological processes. It provides an extensive, though not exhaustive, overview of the findings related to this field. In parallel, it points to issues to be addressed in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Light Signalling)
Open AccessReview From Plant Infectivity to Growth Patterns: The Role of Blue-Light Sensing in the Prokaryotic World
Plants 2014, 3(1), 70-94; doi:10.3390/plants3010070
Received: 3 December 2013 / Revised: 14 January 2014 / Accepted: 15 January 2014 / Published: 27 January 2014
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (1002 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Flavin-based photoreceptor proteins of the LOV (Light, Oxygen, and Voltage) and BLUF (Blue Light sensing Using Flavins) superfamilies are ubiquitous among the three life domains and are essential blue-light sensing systems, not only in plants and algae, but also in prokaryotes. Here we
[...] Read more.
Flavin-based photoreceptor proteins of the LOV (Light, Oxygen, and Voltage) and BLUF (Blue Light sensing Using Flavins) superfamilies are ubiquitous among the three life domains and are essential blue-light sensing systems, not only in plants and algae, but also in prokaryotes. Here we review their biological roles in the prokaryotic world and their evolution pathways. An unexpected large number of bacterial species possess flavin-based photosensors, amongst which are important human and plant pathogens. Still, few cases are reported where the activity of blue-light sensors could be correlated to infectivity and/or has been shown to be involved in the activation of specific genes, resulting in selective growth patterns. Metagenomics and bio-informatic analysis have only recently been initiated, but signatures are beginning to emerge that allow definition of a bona fide LOV or BLUF domain, aiming at better selection criteria for novel blue-light sensors. We also present here, for the first time, the phylogenetic tree for archaeal LOV domains that have reached a statistically significant number but have not at all been investigated thus far. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Light Signalling)

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