E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Tea Chemistry "

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Jacquelyn Gervay-Hague

UC Davis, Department of Chemistry, Davis, United States
Website | E-Mail
Interests: the chemistry of tea growth; harvest and processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tea is the most widely-consumed beverage in the world after water. Annually, it is a multi-billion dollar import business in the US, where less than 100 acres are currently farmed. Although Camellia sinensis (C.s.) growth and tea production and consumption are major economic drivers worldwide, surprisingly little is known about the environmental factors that contribute to sustainable cultivation of high quality tea even in regions where tea has grown for centuries. Many agree that water, soil, and climate affect tea plant sustainability, impact nutrient uptake and impact tea quality. However, the chemical basis of these correlates is yet to be established.

This Special Issue aims to attract contributions on all aspects of the chemistry and chemical biology of Camellia sinensis growth that impact tea quality. Contributions focused on correlating chemical measurements of growing conditions with tea quality are of special interest.

Prof. Jacquelyn Gervay-Hague
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cultivar
  • terroir
  • climate
  • nutrients
  • nitrogen
  • phosphorous
  • drought

Published Papers (1 paper)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Bioactive Compound Fingerprint Analysis of Aged Raw Pu’er Tea and Young Ripened Pu’er Tea
Molecules 2018, 23(8), 1931; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23081931
Received: 16 July 2018 / Revised: 26 July 2018 / Accepted: 2 August 2018 / Published: 2 August 2018
PDF Full-text (1241 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pu’er tea produced from Camellia sinensis var. assamica is a widely appreciated and consumed beverage that can be divided into two kinds of tea depending on the different fermentation processed used, the special sensory characteristics, and their chemical composition. However, authentication seems to
[...] Read more.
Pu’er tea produced from Camellia sinensis var. assamica is a widely appreciated and consumed beverage that can be divided into two kinds of tea depending on the different fermentation processed used, the special sensory characteristics, and their chemical composition. However, authentication seems to be very important for such teas, as they are traded to comparatively high prices, especially in Europe. The results for selected biochemical markers showed that aged raw pu’er tea contained 210.2 mg GAE/g polyphenols, of which 2.2 mg/g were gallic acid, 16.1 mg/g theogallin, 35.1 mg/g (−)-epigallocatechin gallate, and 40.1 mg/g (−)-epicatechin gallate, on average. Young ripened pu’er tea contained about 104.6 mg GAE/g polyphenols, of which 5.5 mg/g gallic acid, 0.9 mg/g theogallin, 0.7 mg/g (−)-epigallocatechin gallate, and 1.8 mg/g (−)-epicatechin gallate, on average. An additional objective of the present study was to unravel the best brewing conditions for optimal extraction of the bioactive compounds. Infusions of nineteen commercial teas (from pu’er cakes) were obtained at different time-temperature ratios for studying the content of bioactive compounds (flavan-3-ols, flavonols, caffeoylquinic acids, methylxanthines). Brewing at 90 °C for 5 min was the best condition to obtain a high content of total polyphenols in ripened pu’er tea. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis showed, that young ripened and aged raw pu’er tea can be successfully differentiated by the analyzed chemical compounds. Principal component analysis results indicated that young ripened pu’er tea has higher contents of gallic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol than aged raw pu’er tea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tea Chemistry )
Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to Top