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Special Issue "Polysaccharide-based Materials"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioorganic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2017

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jun-ichi Kadokawa

Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology, and Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: polysaccharides; supramolecules; nanostructures; enzymatic synthesis; ionic liquids

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polysaccharides are widely distributed and exhibit specific functions in nature. They are composed of a wide variety of monosaccharide residues through glycosidic linkages with highly stereo- and regio-controlled arrangements. Such diverse structures of natural polysaccharides contribute to showing a wide range of properties and natures, which provide to be employed as components in functional materials. Although natural polysaccharides often show poor solubilities in common solvents, leading to difficulty in proccessability, dissolution media, such as ionic liquids, have been found to efficiently dissolve polysaccharides. Synthesis of non-natural polysaccharides has also attracted a great deal of attention to obtain new polysaccharide-based functional materials. Owing to complicated structures, chemical synthesis of polysaccharides is one of challenging research topics in glycoscience. Efficient synthetic methods with highly stereo- and regio-construction of glycosidic linkages, such as enzymatic approach, recently, have been developed to produce well-defined polysaccharides.

This Special Issue aims at covering all fields concerning polysaccharide-based materials, including synthetic method, new functions, supramolecular and hierarchically controlled structures, environmentally benign and biomedical applications, and so on. Researchers in these fields are, therefore, warmly invited to propose relevant reviews, perspectives, and research papers to be published in this Special Issue of Molecules.

Prof. Dr. Jun-ichi Kadokawa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • New synthetic methods
  • Derivatization and modification, functional materials
  • Supramolecules
  • Hierarchically controlled structures
  • Environmentally benign materials
  • Biomedical applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effects of Polysaccharides from Platycodon grandiflorum on Immunity-Enhancing Activity In Vitro
Molecules 2017, 22(11), 1918; doi:10.3390/molecules22111918
Received: 28 September 2017 / Revised: 30 October 2017 / Accepted: 2 November 2017 / Published: 7 November 2017
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Abstract
The study is aimed at investigating the immunoenhancement activity of polysaccharides from Platycodon grandiflorum polysaccharides (PGPSs) in vitro. In this study, some research on lymphocyte proliferation, cell cycle, and the levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were performed. Four different
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The study is aimed at investigating the immunoenhancement activity of polysaccharides from Platycodon grandiflorum polysaccharides (PGPSs) in vitro. In this study, some research on lymphocyte proliferation, cell cycle, and the levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were performed. Four different concentrations of PGPSs (PGPStc, PGPS60c, PGPS80c, and PGPStp) were harvested and added to peripheral blood T lymphocytes. We observed significant increases in T lymphocyte proliferation at PGPStc groups individually or synergistically with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) at most concentrations, and their lymphocyte proliferation rates were the highest. The active sites of PGPStc and PGPS60c were subsequently chosen. Then, we utilized flow cytometry to determine lymphocyte cell cycle distribution and levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. At most time points, PGPStc could facilitate lymphocyte cell cycle progression from the G0/G1 phase to the S and G2/M phases and, simultaneously, increase the levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that PGPStc enhances the immune functions, suggesting that PGPStc could be a potential immunopotentiator for further in vivo and clinical trial experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharide-based Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Cellulase-Assisted Extraction of Polysaccharides from White Hyacinth Bean: Characterization of Antioxidant Activity and Promotion for Probiotics Proliferation
Molecules 2017, 22(10), 1764; doi:10.3390/molecules22101764
Received: 13 September 2017 / Revised: 16 October 2017 / Accepted: 17 October 2017 / Published: 20 October 2017
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Abstract
Food-derived polysaccharides have advantages over synthetical compounds and have attracted interest globally for decades. In this study, we optimized the cellulase-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from white hyacinth bean (PWBs) with the aid of response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum extraction parameters were a
[...] Read more.
Food-derived polysaccharides have advantages over synthetical compounds and have attracted interest globally for decades. In this study, we optimized the cellulase-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from white hyacinth bean (PWBs) with the aid of response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum extraction parameters were a pH of 7.79, a cellulase of 2.73%, and a ratio of water to material of 61.39, producing a high polysaccharide yield (3.32 ± 0.03)%. The scavenging ability of PWBs varied on three radicals (hydroxyl > 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) > superoxide). Furthermore, PWBs contributed to the proliferation of three probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5, Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01, and Lactobacillus bulgaricus LB6). These investigations of PWBs provide a novel bioresource for the exploitation of antioxidant and probiotic bacterial proliferation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharide-based Materials)
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Figure 1a

Open AccessArticle Evaluation of the Molecular Structural Parameters of Normal Rice Starch and Their Relationships with Its Thermal and Digestion Properties
Molecules 2017, 22(9), 1526; doi:10.3390/molecules22091526
Received: 12 August 2017 / Revised: 3 September 2017 / Accepted: 9 September 2017 / Published: 12 September 2017
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Abstract
The molecular structural parameters of six normal rice starches with different amylose contents were investigated through their iodine absorption spectra and gel permeation chromatography of fully branched and debranched starches. The thermal and digestion properties of starches were also determined and their relationships
[...] Read more.
The molecular structural parameters of six normal rice starches with different amylose contents were investigated through their iodine absorption spectra and gel permeation chromatography of fully branched and debranched starches. The thermal and digestion properties of starches were also determined and their relationships with molecular structural parameters were analyzed. Results showed that the molecular structural parameters of maximum absorption wavelength, blue value (BV), optical density 620 nm/550 nm (OD 620/550), amylose, intermediate component, and amylopectin, including its short branch-chains, long branch-chains, and branching degree, had high correlation in different determining methods. The intermediate component of starch was significantly positively related to amylose and negatively related to amylopectin, and the amylopectin branching degree was significantly positively related to amylopectin content and negatively related to amylose content. The gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy of native starch were significantly positively related to BV, OD 620/550, and amylose content and negatively related to amylopectin short branch-chains. The gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy of retrograded starch were significantly negatively related to amylopectin branching degree. The digestions of gelatinized and retrograded starches were significantly negatively related to the BV, OD 620/550, amylose, and intermediate component and positively related to amylopectin and its short branch-chains and branching degree. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharide-based Materials)
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