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Special Issue "Template Directed Synthesis and Self-Assembly in Organic Systems"

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A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Organic Synthesis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Lluïsa Pérez-García

Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (IN2UB), Universitat de Barcelona, Avda Joan XXIII s/n, 08028-Barcelona, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: supramolecular chemistry; template synthesis and self-assembly in organic systems; bio-functionalization of micronanotools for tagging and actuation in living cells; anion recognition; gold nanoparticles and hydrogels for drug delivery; molecular machines and switches; porphyrins for photodynamic therapy; pharmaceuticals based on ionic liquids

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Supramolecular Chemistry has shed new light on the classical concept of organic synthesis. By controlling the non-covalent intermolecular bond - in a manner similar to biological systems’ - it is possible to obtain systems that are not easily accessible through conventional synthetic methods.

The primary supramolecular process in self-assembly is molecular recognition, while the synthetic driving force primarily derives from kinetic effects, which mainly rely on synthetic strategies based on template-directed methodologies. Thus, molecular recognition is based on the fact that some compounds contain the necessary information in their structure to promote the formation of certain assemblies.

What is now termed “non-covalent synthesis” has revolutionized traditional synthetic strategies, and supramolecular synthesis has allowed for the preparation of a variety of molecular receptors that are capable of selective recognition. Spontaneous self-assembly, which occurs as a result of the complementarity of superstructure components, has enabled the preparation of molecules, macromolecules, and supramolecules of nanoscale dimensions, as well as of mechanically interlocked architectures.

The objective of this special issue of Molecules is to highlight both the latest advances in template-directed synthesis and the recent applications of self-assembly in organic systems.

Dr. Lluïsa Pérez-García
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • supramolecular chemistry
  • non-covalent interactions
  • template-directed synthesis
  • organic chemistry
  • molecular recognition
  • self-assembly
  • self-organization
  • catenanes and rotaxanes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Nanoscale Lithography Mediated by Surface Self-Assembly of 16-[3,5-Bis(Mercaptomethyl)phenoxy]hexadecanoic Acid on Au(111) Investigated by Scanning Probe Microscopy
Molecules 2014, 19(9), 13010-13026; doi:10.3390/molecules190913010
Received: 7 May 2014 / Revised: 9 August 2014 / Accepted: 18 August 2014 / Published: 25 August 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4584 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The solution-phase self-assembly of bidentate 16-[3,5-bis(mercapto-methyl)phenoxy]hexadecanoic acid (BMPHA) on Au(111) was studied using nano-fabrication protocols with scanning probe nanolithography and immersion particle lithography. Molecularly thin films of BMPHA prepared by surface self-assembly have potential application as spatially selective layers in sensor designs. Either
[...] Read more.
The solution-phase self-assembly of bidentate 16-[3,5-bis(mercapto-methyl)phenoxy]hexadecanoic acid (BMPHA) on Au(111) was studied using nano-fabrication protocols with scanning probe nanolithography and immersion particle lithography. Molecularly thin films of BMPHA prepared by surface self-assembly have potential application as spatially selective layers in sensor designs. Either monolayer or bilayer films of BMPHA can be formed under ambient conditions, depending on the parameters of concentration and immersion intervals. Experiments with scanning probe-based lithography (nanoshaving and nanografting) were applied to measure the thickness of BMPHA films. The thickness of a monolayer and bilayer film of BMPHA on Au(111) were measured in situ with atomic force microscopy using n-octadecanethiol as an internal reference. Scanning probe-based nanofabrication provides a way to insert nanopatterns of a reference molecule of known dimensions within a matrix film of unknown thickness to enable a direct comparison of heights and surface morphology. Immersion particle lithography was used to prepare a periodic arrangement of nanoholes within films of BMPHA. The nanoholes could be backfilled by immersion in a SAM solution to produce nanodots of n-octadecanethiol surrounded by a film of BMPHA. Test platforms prepared by immersion particle lithography enables control of the dimensions of surface sites to construct supramolecular assemblies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Template Directed Synthesis and Self-Assembly in Organic Systems)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Self-Assembly: From Amphiphiles to Chromophores and Beyond
Molecules 2014, 19(6), 8589-8609; doi:10.3390/molecules19068589
Received: 30 April 2014 / Revised: 17 June 2014 / Accepted: 17 June 2014 / Published: 23 June 2014
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (1713 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Self-assembly has been recognised as a ubiquitous aspect of modern chemistry. Our understanding and applications of self-assembly are substantially based on what has been learned from biochemical systems. In this review, we describe various aspects of self-assembly commencing with an account of the
[...] Read more.
Self-assembly has been recognised as a ubiquitous aspect of modern chemistry. Our understanding and applications of self-assembly are substantially based on what has been learned from biochemical systems. In this review, we describe various aspects of self-assembly commencing with an account of the soft structures that are available by assembly of surfactant amphiphiles, which are important scientific and industrial materials. Variation of molecular design using rules defined by surfactant self-assembly permits synthesis of functional nanostructures in solution and at surfaces while increasing the strength of intermolecular interactions through π-π stacking, metal cation coordination and/or hydrogen bonding leads to formation of highly complex bespoke nanostructured materials exemplified by DNA assemblies. We describe the origins of self-assembly involving aggregation of lipid amphiphiles and how this subject has been expanded to include other highly advanced chemical systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Template Directed Synthesis and Self-Assembly in Organic Systems)
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