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Special Issue "The Potential Use of Herbal Medicinal Products in Chronic Disorders"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chingfeng Weng

Department of Life Science and Institute of Biotechnology, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 886-3-8903649
Interests: molecular physiology; herbal medicine; translational medicine; endocrinology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, many conventional drugs have been hampered by a lack of effectiveness, antibiotic resistance, high side effects and burdens. This has to be overcome by new strategies and therapeutic alternatives. Natural products are considered to be an important source for new anticancer, antidiabetic, neurodegenerative diseases, antimicrobials, pathogenic fungi, viruses, and parasites. For the past few dacades, herbal medicinal products have proven their efficacy at curing or attenuating symptoms of many chronic diseases, such as metabolic disorder (diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, steatosis), auto-immune diseases (lupus, rhumatoid arthritis), inflammation diseases (inflammatory bowel disease, colitis), and degenerative diseases (arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzeheimer’s disease). These herbal medicinal products, including pure compounds, extracts, and decoctions, ameliorate disease progression through many characteristics, such as inflammatory modulators, insulin sensitizers, and homeostatic keepers. This Special Issue hopes to comprehensively highlight the newest discoveries in herbal medicinal products for treating or attenuating symptoms of chronic diseases, especially herbal medicinal products as adjuvants for current treatments, side effect attenuators, or synergy toward current medicines. Additionally, studies that debate herbal–herbal interactions and herbal–drug are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Chingfeng Weng
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • herbal medicine
  • chronic diseases
  • adjuvant
  • herbal-herbal interaction
  • alternative medicine

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Comparative Bioavailability of Two Diosmin Formulations after Oral Administration to Healthy Volunteers
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2174; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092174
Received: 26 July 2018 / Revised: 24 August 2018 / Accepted: 25 August 2018 / Published: 29 August 2018
PDF Full-text (665 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Diosmin is a flavonoid commonly found in citrus fruits, largely used as adjuvant treatment for circulatory disorders, including chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and hemorrhoids. Following oral administration, diosmin is not directly absorbed but must first be hydrolyzed into its aglycone, diosmetin, which is
[...] Read more.
Diosmin is a flavonoid commonly found in citrus fruits, largely used as adjuvant treatment for circulatory disorders, including chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and hemorrhoids. Following oral administration, diosmin is not directly absorbed but must first be hydrolyzed into its aglycone, diosmetin, which is then absorbed into the systemic circulation. The aim of the current cross-over clinical study was to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of µSmin® Plus, a micronized diosmin flavonoid complex standardized in diosmin and formulated with a buffering agent (tested formulation). The study compared this to unformulated micronized diosmin (reference), in 16 healthy volunteers. Plasma samples were analyzed by HPLC-MS and plasma diosmetin concentration was measured after deconjugation with β-glucuronidase. For the tested formulation area under the curve (AUC0-t), and maximum plasma and time concentration (Cmax; tmax) were found to be 298.4 ± 163.7, 50.3 ± 22.6 and 2.2 ± 2.9, respectively. AUC0-t and Cmax of the reference were 31.9 ± 100.4 and 2.4 ± 1.9, respectively. The tested formulation showed higher plasmatic concentrations of diosmetin in comparison to those obtained after the administration of unformulated micronized diosmin. The relative bioavailability was 9.4 greater for the tested formulation than in micronized diosmin. In conclusion, our data indicate that µSmin® Plus was rapidly and well absorbed into systemic circulation and may therefore be ideally suitable to deliver diosmin in human interventional trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Potential Use of Herbal Medicinal Products in Chronic Disorders)
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