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Special Issue "New Drug Delivery System"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Rita Muzzalupo

Department Pharmacy, Health and Nutrition Sciences, University of Calabria, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (CS)-Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Vesicular systems and polymeric carrier for drug delivery; Nanotechnologies for Drug targeting; Nanotechnologies for Transdermal delivery; Nanotechnologies for Cancer therapy
Guest Editor
Dr. Lorena Tavano

Department Pharmacy, Health and Nutrition Sciences, University of Calabria, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (CS)-Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: drug delivery; drug delivery systems; liposomes; niosomes; drug targeting; liquid crystal for drug delivery; drug transdermal release

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. Delivering drugs at controlled rate, slow delivery, targeted delivery are other very attractive methods and have been pursued enthusiastically.

Various drug delivery and targeting systems have been developed in order to minimize drug degradation and adverse effect, and to increase drug bioavailability. Site-specific drug delivery may be either an active and/or passive process.

In the last few years, researchers have appreciated the potential benefits of nanotechnologies in providing vast improvements to drug delivery and targeting. Improving delivery techniques that minimize toxicity and increase efficacy offer great potential benefits to patients, and open up new markets for pharmaceutical companies.

As Guest Editor, I invite researchers to submit their relevant studies on this topic to Special Issue of Molecules. The aim of this issue is to provide a recent insight into the new nanotechnologies useful for drug delivery.

Prof. Dr. Rita Muzzalupo
Dr. Lorena Tavano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanoparticle in drug delivery
  • Liposome in drug delivery
  • Niosome in drug delivery
  • Polymeric carrier in drug delivery
  • Nanotechnologies for Drug targeting
  • Nanotechnologies for Gene therapy
  • Nanotechnologies for Transdermal delivery
  • Nanotechnologies for Cancer therapy
  • Theranostic nanoparticles
  • Magnetic nanoparticles

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Novel Method to Improve the Anticancer Activity of Natural-Based Hydroxyapatite against the Liver Cancer Cell Line HepG2 Using Mesoporous Magnesia as a Micro-Carrier
Molecules 2017, 22(12), 1947; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules22121947
Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 30 October 2017 / Accepted: 8 November 2017 / Published: 24 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2951 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Micro-carriers are the best known vehicles to transport different kinds of drugs to achieve high impact. In this study, mesoporous magnesium oxide has been harnessed as a micro-carrier to encapsulate the anticancer candidate drug natural-based cubic hydroxyapatite (HAP). HAP@MgO composites with different HAP
[...] Read more.
Micro-carriers are the best known vehicles to transport different kinds of drugs to achieve high impact. In this study, mesoporous magnesium oxide has been harnessed as a micro-carrier to encapsulate the anticancer candidate drug natural-based cubic hydroxyapatite (HAP). HAP@MgO composites with different HAP loading (0–60 wt %), were prepared by a hydrothermal treatment method using triethanol amine as a template. The characterization of the prepared composites were achieved by using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR and SEM. Characterization data confirm the formation of sphere-like structures of MgO containing HAP particles. It was observed that the size of the spheres increased with HAP loading up to 40 wt %, then collapsed. Furthermore, the anticancer property of the prepared composites was evaluated against the HepG2 liver cancer cell line. The HAP@MgO composites exhibited higher activity than neat MgO or HAP. The 20 wt % of HAP was the optimum loading to control cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Apoptosis was determined by typical apoptotic bodies produced by the cell membrane. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Drug Delivery System)
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