Special Issue "Optofluidics: From Fundamental Research to Applications"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Michinao Hashimoto

Engineering Product Development, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microfluidics; microfabrication; digital fabrication; biomaterials; drug delivery; bioMEMS; diagnostics; flexible devices; soft robots
Guest Editor
Dr. Paolo Minzioni

Integrated Photonics Laboratory, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering, Università di Pavia, Via Ferrata, 5 A, Pavia I-27100, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nonlinear optics; silicon photonics; integrated devices; optical resonators; fiber transmission systems; optical phase conjugation; spectral inversion; optical trapping; biophotonics; microfuidics; acustofluidics; optofluidics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to the Special Issue “Optofluidics: From Fundamental Research to Applications” organized by the MDPI journal Micromachines (http://www.mdpi.com/journal/micromachines).

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide scientists working in the field with an up-to-date collection of papers investigating the world of micro-opto-fluidic devices. It will include both original research papers and short communications, together with invited review articles, covering the different aspects from basic research and components, up to technologically-mature integrated devices for biomedical applications.

The Special Issue will be published in the open access journal Micromachines (by MDPI AG, Basel – CH, current Impact Factor 1.833) so as to allow wide dissemination of the research results.

Thanks to a close collaboration with the Optofluidics 2017 conference (http://www.optofluidics.sg 25–28 July, 2017, Singapore), providing an international and interdisciplinary forum for researchers, the Special Issue will also include relevant papers dealing with the conference topics.

Dr. Michinao Hashimoto
Dr. Paolo Minzioni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microfluidics
  • Optofluidics
  • Lab-on-chip
  • Single-cell analysis
  • Immuonosensors
  • Biochemical sensors
  • Plasmonics
  • Optical imaging
  • Cell sorting
  • Water quality monitoring
  • Point-of-Care diagnosis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Parametric Excitation of Optomechanical Resonators by Periodical Modulation
Micromachines 2018, 9(4), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9040193
Received: 26 February 2018 / Revised: 4 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 18 April 2018
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Abstract
Optical excitation of mechanical resonators has long been a research interest, since it has great applications in the physical and engineering field. Previous optomechanical methods rely on the wavelength-dependent, optical anti-damping effects, with the working range limited to the blue-detuning range. In this
[...] Read more.
Optical excitation of mechanical resonators has long been a research interest, since it has great applications in the physical and engineering field. Previous optomechanical methods rely on the wavelength-dependent, optical anti-damping effects, with the working range limited to the blue-detuning range. In this study, we experimentally demonstrated the excitation of optomechanical resonators by periodical modulation. The wavelength working range was extended from the blue-detuning to red-detuning range. This demonstration will provide a new way to excite mechanical resonators and benefit practical applications, such as optical mass sensors and gyroscopes with an extended working range. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optofluidics: From Fundamental Research to Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Two-Directional Tuning of Distributed Feedback Film Dye Laser Devices
Micromachines 2017, 8(12), 362; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi8120362
Received: 28 November 2017 / Revised: 12 December 2017 / Accepted: 12 December 2017 / Published: 16 December 2017
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Abstract
We demonstrate a two-directional tuning method of distributed feedback (DFB) film dye laser devices to achieve high quality lasing and a large tuning range. In this work, we proposed a simple method to fabricate a continuous tunable solid-state dye laser on a flexible
[...] Read more.
We demonstrate a two-directional tuning method of distributed feedback (DFB) film dye laser devices to achieve high quality lasing and a large tuning range. In this work, we proposed a simple method to fabricate a continuous tunable solid-state dye laser on a flexible Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film. In order to obtain stable and tunable output lasing, the stretching property of the gelatine host was improved by mixing with a certain ratio of glycerol to prevent DFB cavity destruction. We employed two different tuning strategies of the DFB film dye lasers, by stretching the PDMS film in two perpendicular directions, and a nearly 40 nm tuning range in each direction was achieved. The laser device maintained single mode lasing with 0.12 nm linewidth during the tuning process. The reported tunable DFB film dye laser devices have huge potential as coherent light sources for sensing and spectroscopy applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optofluidics: From Fundamental Research to Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Label-Free Monitoring of Diffusion in Microfluidics
Micromachines 2017, 8(11), 329; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi8110329
Received: 12 October 2017 / Revised: 3 November 2017 / Accepted: 6 November 2017 / Published: 9 November 2017
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Abstract
Label-free, real-time detection of concentration gradients is demonstrated in a microfluidic H-filter, using an integrated photonic crystal slab sensor to monitor sample refractive index with spatial resolution. The recorded diffusion profiles reveal root-mean-square diffusion lengths for non-fluorescing and non-absorbing molecules, both small (glucose,
[...] Read more.
Label-free, real-time detection of concentration gradients is demonstrated in a microfluidic H-filter, using an integrated photonic crystal slab sensor to monitor sample refractive index with spatial resolution. The recorded diffusion profiles reveal root-mean-square diffusion lengths for non-fluorescing and non-absorbing molecules, both small (glucose, 180 Da) and large (bovine serum albumin, 67 kDa). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optofluidics: From Fundamental Research to Applications)
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