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Special Issue "Biodegradability of Materials"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2009)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Vladimir P. Torchilin

University Distinguished Professor, Director, Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine, Northeastern University, 140 The Fenway, room 214, 360 Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02115, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +617 373 7509
Interests: drug carriers; drug delivery sytems; drug targeting; liposomes; micelles; experimental cancer immunology; imaging agents
Editorial Advisor
Dr. Naozumi Teramoto

Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +81 47 478 0406
Interests: biomaterial; bio-based polymer; bioplastics; biodegradable polymer; biopolymer; composite material comprising a polymer matrix

Special Issue Information

To protect environment, the biodegradable materials have great advantage. However, sometimes, for material stability, biodegradation is a problem, for example, the biomedical materials.

Keywords

  • biodegradable polymers, organics or materials

Related Special Issues

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Biodegradability of Poly(hydroxyalkanoate) Materials
Materials 2009, 2(3), 1104-1126; doi:10.3390/ma2031104
Received: 15 July 2009 / Revised: 19 August 2009 / Accepted: 24 August 2009 / Published: 28 August 2009
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (1667 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA), which is produced from renewable carbon resources by many microorganisms, is an environmentally compatible polymeric material and can be processed into films and fibers. Biodegradation of PHA material occurs due to the action of extracellular PHA depolymerase secreted from microorganisms in
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Poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA), which is produced from renewable carbon resources by many microorganisms, is an environmentally compatible polymeric material and can be processed into films and fibers. Biodegradation of PHA material occurs due to the action of extracellular PHA depolymerase secreted from microorganisms in various natural environments. A key step in determining the overall enzymatic or environmental degradation rate of PHA material is the degradation of PHA lamellar crystals in materials; hence, the degradation mechanism of PHA lamellar crystals has been studied in detail over the last two decades. In this review, the relationship between crystal structure and enzymatic degradation behavior, in particular degradation rates, of films and fibers for PHA is described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradability of Materials)
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Open AccessReview Eco-Challenges of Bio-Based Polymer Composites
Materials 2009, 2(3), 911-925; doi:10.3390/ma2030911
Received: 25 July 2009 / Revised: 3 August 2009 / Accepted: 6 August 2009 / Published: 10 August 2009
Cited by 55 | PDF Full-text (423 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years bio-based polymer composites have been the subject of many scientific and research projects, as well as many commercial programs. Growing global environmental and social concern, the high rate of depletion of petroleum resources and new environmental regulations have forced the
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In recent years bio-based polymer composites have been the subject of many scientific and research projects, as well as many commercial programs. Growing global environmental and social concern, the high rate of depletion of petroleum resources and new environmental regulations have forced the search for new composites and green materials, compatible with the environment. The aim of this article is to present a brief review of the most suitable and commonly used biodegradable polymer matrices and NF reinforcements in eco-composites and nanocomposites, with special focus on PLA based materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradability of Materials)
Open AccessReview Biodegradable Cellulose-based Hydrogels: Design and Applications
Materials 2009, 2(2), 353-373; doi:10.3390/ma2020353
Received: 28 February 2009 / Revised: 3 April 2009 / Accepted: 9 April 2009 / Published: 16 April 2009
Cited by 159 | PDF Full-text (366 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hydrogels are macromolecular networks able to absorb and release water solutions in a reversible manner, in response to specific environmental stimuli. Such stimuli-sensitive behaviour makes hydrogels appealing for the design of ‘smart’ devices, applicable in a variety of technological fields. In particular, in
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Hydrogels are macromolecular networks able to absorb and release water solutions in a reversible manner, in response to specific environmental stimuli. Such stimuli-sensitive behaviour makes hydrogels appealing for the design of ‘smart’ devices, applicable in a variety of technological fields. In particular, in cases where either ecological or biocompatibility issues are concerned, the biodegradability of the hydrogel network, together with the control of the degradation rate, may provide additional value to the developed device. This review surveys the design and the applications of cellulose-based hydrogels, which are extensively investigated due to the large availability of cellulose in nature, the intrinsic degradability of cellulose and the smart behaviour displayed by some cellulose derivatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradability of Materials)
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Open AccessReview Biodegradable Polymers
Materials 2009, 2(2), 307-344; doi:10.3390/ma2020307
Received: 25 February 2009 / Revised: 25 March 2009 / Accepted: 30 March 2009 / Published: 1 April 2009
Cited by 214 | PDF Full-text (222 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Biodegradable materials are used in packaging, agriculture, medicine and other areas. In recent years there has been an increase in interest in biodegradable polymers. Two classes of biodegradable polymers can be distinguished: synthetic or natural polymers. There are polymers produced from feedstocks derived
[...] Read more.
Biodegradable materials are used in packaging, agriculture, medicine and other areas. In recent years there has been an increase in interest in biodegradable polymers. Two classes of biodegradable polymers can be distinguished: synthetic or natural polymers. There are polymers produced from feedstocks derived either from petroleum resources (non renewable resources) or from biological resources (renewable resources). In general natural polymers offer fewer advantages than synthetic polymers. The following review presents an overview of the different biodegradable polymers that are currently being used and their properties, as well as new developments in their synthesis and applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradability of Materials)
Open AccessReview Anaerobic Biodegradation of Detergent Surfactants
Materials 2009, 2(1), 181-206; doi:10.3390/ma2010181
Received: 4 February 2009 / Revised: 5 March 2009 / Accepted: 12 March 2009 / Published: 16 March 2009
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (187 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Detergent surfactantscan be found in wastewater in relevant concentrations. Most of them are known as ready degradable under aerobic conditions, as required by European legislation. Far fewer surfactants have been tested so far for biodegradability under anaerobic conditions. The natural environment is predominantly
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Detergent surfactantscan be found in wastewater in relevant concentrations. Most of them are known as ready degradable under aerobic conditions, as required by European legislation. Far fewer surfactants have been tested so far for biodegradability under anaerobic conditions. The natural environment is predominantly aerobic, but there are some environmental compartments such as river sediments, sub-surface soil layer and anaerobic sludge digesters of wastewater treatment plants which have strictly anaerobic conditions. This review gives an overview on anaerobic biodegradation processes, the methods for testing anaerobic biodegradability, and the anaerobic biodegradability of different detergent surfactant types (anionic, nonionic, cationic, amphoteric surfactants). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradability of Materials)
Open AccessReview Surfactant-mediated Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Materials 2009, 2(1), 76-94; doi:10.3390/ma2010076
Received: 6 February 2009 / Revised: 19 February 2009 / Accepted: 20 February 2009 / Published: 23 February 2009
Cited by 48 | PDF Full-text (162 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are toxic environmental pollutants that are known or suspected carcinogens or mutagens. Bioremediation has been used as a general way to eliminate them from the contaminated sites or aquifers, but their biodegradation is rather limited due to their low
[...] Read more.
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are toxic environmental pollutants that are known or suspected carcinogens or mutagens. Bioremediation has been used as a general way to eliminate them from the contaminated sites or aquifers, but their biodegradation is rather limited due to their low bioavailability because of their sparingly soluble nature. Surfactant-mediated biodegradation is a promising alternative. The presence of surfactants can increase the solubility of PAHs and hence potentially increase their bioavailability. However, inconclusive results have been reported on the effects of surfactant on the biodegradation of PAHs. In this work, surfactant-mediated biodegradation of PAHs is reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradability of Materials)
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