E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dusan Losic

School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +61 8 8303 4373
Interests: nanomaterials; nanoengineering; nanomedicine; biosensing; bioseparations; functional biomaterials; bioinspired materials; drug-releasing implants; nano-carriers for drug delivery; diatom nanotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The “Materials” Journal’s special issue invites the original research articles, communications and comprehensive reviews on synthesis and applications of Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors. The scope of this special issue covers very broad aspects  from fundamental concepts of biosensing using nanomaterials, their synthesis, engineering  their sensing properties based on optical, electrochemical, magnetic, acoustic, and thermal transduction, their integration with biological elements, designing of biosensing devices, evaluation their sensing performance and exploring their broad applications from medical diagnostics, industry, environmental control, food analysis, defence etc. The topic will specifically cover recent progress on development new synthetic approaches for synthesis these advanced nanomaterials for biosensing with different chemical compositions  (metals, semiconductors, metal-oxides, polymers, graphene, DNA, enzymes etc), nanoscale dimensions and morphologies (particles, pores, wires, tubes, rods etc), characterization their sensing properties,  focused on designing new biosensing devices with improved performances for emerging applications.

Prof. Dr. Dusan Losic
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanostructures
  • nanofabrication
  • sol-gel
  • electrochemical synthesis
  • carbon nanotubes
  • graphene
  • nanopores
  • nano rod arrays
  • molecular detection
  • nanosensors
  • optical biosensors
  • electrochemical biosensors
  • DNA biosensors
  • immunosensors
  • enzyme biosensors
  • medical diagnostics
  • biosensing devices
  • microchip

Published Papers (9 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-9
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Synthesis of Water-Dispersed Ferrecene/Phenylboronic Acid-Modified Bifunctional Gold Nanoparticles and the Application in Biosensing
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5554-5564; doi:10.3390/ma7085554
Received: 9 May 2014 / Revised: 17 July 2014 / Accepted: 24 July 2014 / Published: 31 July 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (700 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Phenylboronic acids can form tight covalent bonds with diol-containing biomolecules. In this work, water-dispersed bifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified with ferrecene (Fc)-derivatized peptides and 4-mercaptophenylboronic acids (MBA) (denoted as Fc–MBA–AuNPs) were synthesized and characterized by UV/vis spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. To demonstrate
[...] Read more.
Phenylboronic acids can form tight covalent bonds with diol-containing biomolecules. In this work, water-dispersed bifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified with ferrecene (Fc)-derivatized peptides and 4-mercaptophenylboronic acids (MBA) (denoted as Fc–MBA–AuNPs) were synthesized and characterized by UV/vis spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. To demonstrate the application and the analytical merits of the nanoparticles in biosensing, glycoprotein avidin was tested as a model analyte. Specifically, avidin was captured by the biotin-covered gold electrode via the strong biotin-avidin interaction. Then, Fc–MBA–AuNPs were attached by the captured avidin through the formation of tight covalent bonds between the boronic acid moieties of Fc–MBA–AuNPs and the oligosaccharides of avidin. As a result, a detection limit of 0.2 pM was achieved. We believe that the bifunctional nanoparticles would found many applications in amplified detection of diol-containing species by rational design of the surface chemistry of electrode. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
Open AccessArticle Field Effect Transistor Biosensor Using Antigen Binding Fragment for Detecting Tumor Marker in Human Serum
Materials 2014, 7(4), 2490-2500; doi:10.3390/ma7042490
Received: 3 February 2014 / Revised: 15 March 2014 / Accepted: 19 March 2014 / Published: 27 March 2014
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (536 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Detection of tumor markers is important for cancer diagnosis. Field-effect transistors (FETs) are a promising method for the label-free detection of trace amounts of biomolecules. However, detection of electrically charged proteins using antibody-immobilized FETs is limited by ionic screening by the large probe
[...] Read more.
Detection of tumor markers is important for cancer diagnosis. Field-effect transistors (FETs) are a promising method for the label-free detection of trace amounts of biomolecules. However, detection of electrically charged proteins using antibody-immobilized FETs is limited by ionic screening by the large probe molecules adsorbed to the transistor gate surface, reducing sensor responsiveness. Here, we investigated the effect of probe molecule size on the detection of a tumor marker, α-fetoprotein (AFP) using a FET biosensor. We demonstrated that the small receptor antigen binding fragment (Fab), immobilized on a sensing surface as small as 2–3 nm, offers a higher degree of sensitivity and a wider concentration range (100 pg/mL–1 μg/mL) for the FET detection of AFP in buffer solution, compared to the whole antibody. Therefore, the use of a small Fab probe molecule instead of a whole antibody is shown to be effective for improving the sensitivity of AFP detection in FET biosensors. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that a Fab-immobilized FET subjected to a blocking treatment, to avoid non-specific interactions, could sensitively and selectively detect AFP in human serum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
Open AccessCommunication Magnetic Fe3O4-Based Sandwich-Type Biosensor Using Modified Gold Nanoparticles as Colorimetric Probes for the Detection of Dopamine
Materials 2013, 6(12), 5690-5699; doi:10.3390/ma6125690
Received: 12 November 2013 / Revised: 27 November 2013 / Accepted: 2 December 2013 / Published: 5 December 2013
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (289 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, we designed a visual biosensor for dopamine (DA) detection using magnetic Fe3O4 particles and dithiobis(sulfosuccinimidylpropionate)-modified gold nanoparticles (DTSSP-AuNPs) as the recognition elements. Specifically, DA molecules were assembled onto the surface of DTSSP-AuNPs via the amine coupling reaction
[...] Read more.
In this work, we designed a visual biosensor for dopamine (DA) detection using magnetic Fe3O4 particles and dithiobis(sulfosuccinimidylpropionate)-modified gold nanoparticles (DTSSP-AuNPs) as the recognition elements. Specifically, DA molecules were assembled onto the surface of DTSSP-AuNPs via the amine coupling reaction between the amino group of DA and activated carboxyl group of DTSSP. Accordingly, DA-anchored DTSSP-AuNPs were captured by Fe3O4 through the interaction of catechol and iron. In a magnetic field, the formed Fe3O4-DA-DTSSP-AuNPs conjugates were easily removed from the solution, leading to fading of the AuNPs suspension and decrease of the UV/Vis signal. As a result, a detection limit of 10 nM for DA was achieved. The theoretical simplicity and high selectivity demonstrated that the sandwich-type strategy based on Fe3O4 and AuNPs would lead to many colorimetric detection applications in clinical study by rationally designing the surface chemistry of AuNPs and Fe3O4. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Nanomaterials-Based Sensing Strategies for Electrochemical Detection of MicroRNAs
Materials 2014, 7(7), 5366-5384; doi:10.3390/ma7075366
Received: 23 May 2014 / Revised: 10 June 2014 / Accepted: 14 July 2014 / Published: 23 July 2014
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (1613 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important functions in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. They have been regarded as reliable molecular biomarkers for many diseases including cancer. However, the content of miRNAs in cells can be low down to a few molecules per cell. Thus, highly
[...] Read more.
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important functions in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. They have been regarded as reliable molecular biomarkers for many diseases including cancer. However, the content of miRNAs in cells can be low down to a few molecules per cell. Thus, highly sensitive analytical methods for miRNAs detection are desired. Recently, electrochemical biosensors have held great promise as devices suitable for point-of-care diagnostics and multiplexed platforms for fast, simple and low-cost nucleic acid analysis. Signal amplification by nanomaterials is one of the most popular strategies for developing ultrasensitive assay methods. This review surveys the latest achievements in the use of nanomaterials to detect miRNAs with a focus on electrochemical techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
Open AccessReview Nanostructural Engineering of Nanoporous Anodic Alumina for Biosensing Applications
Materials 2014, 7(7), 5225-5253; doi:10.3390/ma7075225
Received: 16 April 2014 / Revised: 1 July 2014 / Accepted: 10 July 2014 / Published: 18 July 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1973 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Modifying the diameter of the pores in nanoporous anodic alumina opens new possibilities in the application of this material. In this work, we review the different nanoengineering methods by classifying them into two kinds: in situ and ex situ. Ex situ methods
[...] Read more.
Modifying the diameter of the pores in nanoporous anodic alumina opens new possibilities in the application of this material. In this work, we review the different nanoengineering methods by classifying them into two kinds: in situ and ex situ. Ex situ methods imply the interruption of the anodization process and the addition of intermediate steps, while in situ methods aim at realizing the in-depth pore modulation by continuous changes in the anodization conditions. Ex situ methods permit a greater versatility in the pore geometry, while in situ methods are simpler and adequate for repeated cycles. As an example of ex situ methods, we analyze the effect of changing drastically one of the anodization parameters (anodization voltage, electrolyte composition or concentration). We also introduce in situ methods to obtain distributed Bragg reflectors or rugate filters in nanoporous anodic alumina with cyclic anodization voltage or current. This nanopore engineering permits us to propose new applications in the field of biosensing: using the unique reflectance or photoluminescence properties of the material to obtain photonic barcodes, applying a gold-coated double-layer nanoporous alumina to design a self-referencing protein sensor or giving a proof-of-concept of the refractive index sensing capabilities of nanoporous rugate filters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
Open AccessReview New Gold Nanostructures for Sensor Applications: A Review
Materials 2014, 7(7), 5169-5201; doi:10.3390/ma7075169
Received: 20 May 2014 / Revised: 23 June 2014 / Accepted: 7 July 2014 / Published: 17 July 2014
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (1953 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Gold based structures such as nanoparticles (NPs) and nanowires (NWs) have widely been used as building blocks for sensing devices in chemistry and biochemistry fields because of their unusual optical, electrical and mechanical properties. This article gives a detailed review of the new
[...] Read more.
Gold based structures such as nanoparticles (NPs) and nanowires (NWs) have widely been used as building blocks for sensing devices in chemistry and biochemistry fields because of their unusual optical, electrical and mechanical properties. This article gives a detailed review of the new properties and fabrication methods for gold nanostructures, especially gold nanowires (GNWs), and recent developments for their use in optical and electrochemical sensing tools, such as surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
Open AccessReview Plasma-Enabled Carbon Nanostructures for Early Diagnosis of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Materials 2014, 7(7), 4896-4929; doi:10.3390/ma7074896
Received: 27 March 2014 / Revised: 18 June 2014 / Accepted: 20 June 2014 / Published: 25 June 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1862 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Carbon nanostructures (CNs) are amongst the most promising biorecognition nanomaterials due to their unprecedented optical, electrical and structural properties. As such, CNs may be harnessed to tackle the detrimental public health and socio-economic adversities associated with neurodegenerative diseases (NDs). In particular, CNs may
[...] Read more.
Carbon nanostructures (CNs) are amongst the most promising biorecognition nanomaterials due to their unprecedented optical, electrical and structural properties. As such, CNs may be harnessed to tackle the detrimental public health and socio-economic adversities associated with neurodegenerative diseases (NDs). In particular, CNs may be tailored for a specific determination of biomarkers indicative of NDs. However, the realization of such a biosensor represents a significant technological challenge in the uniform fabrication of CNs with outstanding qualities in order to facilitate a highly-sensitive detection of biomarkers suspended in complex biological environments. Notably, the versatility of plasma-based techniques for the synthesis and surface modification of CNs may be embraced to optimize the biorecognition performance and capabilities. This review surveys the recent advances in CN-based biosensors, and highlights the benefits of plasma-processing techniques to enable, enhance, and tailor the performance and optimize the fabrication of CNs, towards the construction of biosensors with unparalleled performance for the early diagnosis of NDs, via a plethora of energy-efficient, environmentally-benign, and inexpensive approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
Figures

Open AccessReview Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Immunosensors for Clinically Significant Biomarkers
Materials 2014, 7(6), 4669-4709; doi:10.3390/ma7064669
Received: 31 March 2014 / Revised: 26 May 2014 / Accepted: 5 June 2014 / Published: 19 June 2014
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (529 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nanotechnology has played a crucial role in the development of biosensors over the past decade. The development, testing, optimization, and validation of new biosensors has become a highly interdisciplinary effort involving experts in chemistry, biology, physics, engineering, and medicine. The sensitivity, the specificity
[...] Read more.
Nanotechnology has played a crucial role in the development of biosensors over the past decade. The development, testing, optimization, and validation of new biosensors has become a highly interdisciplinary effort involving experts in chemistry, biology, physics, engineering, and medicine. The sensitivity, the specificity and the reproducibility of biosensors have improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their design. In general, nanomaterials-based electrochemical immunosensors amplify the sensitivity by facilitating greater loading of the larger sensing surface with biorecognition molecules as well as improving the electrochemical properties of the transducer. The most common types of nanomaterials and their properties will be described. In addition, the utilization of nanomaterials in immunosensors for biomarker detection will be discussed since these biosensors have enormous potential for a myriad of clinical uses. Electrochemical immunosensors provide a specific and simple analytical alternative as evidenced by their brief analysis times, inexpensive instrumentation, lower assay cost as well as good portability and amenability to miniaturization. The role nanomaterials play in biosensors, their ability to improve detection capabilities in low concentration analytes yielding clinically useful data and their impact on other biosensor performance properties will be discussed. Finally, the most common types of electroanalytical detection methods will be briefly touched upon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
Figures

Open AccessReview Nanoporous Anodic Alumina: A Versatile Platform for Optical Biosensors
Materials 2014, 7(6), 4297-4320; doi:10.3390/ma7064297
Received: 19 April 2014 / Revised: 24 May 2014 / Accepted: 27 May 2014 / Published: 30 May 2014
Cited by 34 | PDF Full-text (2577 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) has become one of the most promising nanomaterials in optical biosensing as a result of its unique physical and chemical properties. Many studies have demonstrated the outstanding capabilities of NAA for developing optical biosensors in combination with different optical
[...] Read more.
Nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) has become one of the most promising nanomaterials in optical biosensing as a result of its unique physical and chemical properties. Many studies have demonstrated the outstanding capabilities of NAA for developing optical biosensors in combination with different optical techniques. These results reveal that NAA is a promising alternative to other widely explored nanoporous platforms, such as porous silicon. This review is aimed at reporting on the recent advances and current stage of development of NAA-based optical biosensing devices. The different optical detection techniques, principles and concepts are described in detail along with relevant examples of optical biosensing devices using NAA sensing platforms. Furthermore, we summarise the performance of these devices and provide a future perspective on this promising research field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Materials Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
materials@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Materials
Back to Top