Special Issue "Electrophoretic Deposition"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Aldo R. Boccaccini

Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen, Germany; Visiting Professor, Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BP, UK
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Fax: +49 9131 85 28602
Interests: biomaterials; porous materials; scaffolds; tissue engineering; bioactive glasses; composite materials; waste recycling; carbon nanotubes; electrophoretic deposition; vascularization; bioceramics; biofabrication; bioactive coatings; drug delivery
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Laxmidhar Besra

Colloids & Materials Chemistry Department, Institute of Minerals & Materials Technology (IMMT), Acharya Vihar, Bhubaneswar 751013, Orissa, India
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Begoña Ferrari

Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, CSIC; c/Kelsen 5, Madrid, 28049, Spain
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Assembly strategies (shaping, compaction, and sintering processes) have become key steps in the manufacturing of surface functionalized materials in order to achieve novel properties and functionalities. In this context, Electrophoretic Deposition (EPD) continues to gain interest in the shaping of inorganic–organic particles at any scale (from macroscopic dimensions to nanometers). EPD allows manipulation of the compaction and ordering of any charged entity present in stable suspensions under the application of external electric fields. Fine-tuning of the surface charge of suspended particles, and their interactions with molecules in solution, coupled with the subsequent compaction driven by an electrical force, represent the fundamental processes of EPD. The technique is currently considered a versatile, cost-effective method for the preparation of coatings and thin and thick films, from organic and inorganic materials, and their combinations are useful for a broad range of applications. This technique can, therefore, be used to meet a variety of challenges facing materials science and technology in the healthcare, energy, and transport fields.

For this Special Issue, we are inviting papers in the general field of EPD as a processing technique for the development of inorganic, organic, and hybrid coatings. Topics of interest for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Novel experimental setups for EPD
  • Substrate surface treatments and coatings by EPD
  • Colloidal chemistry knowledge in EPD
  • Microstructure design tools applied to EPD coatings
  • Nanostructured coatings by EPD
  • EPD for corrosion or oxidation protective coatings
  • EPD coatings in biofunctionalization of surfaces
  • EPD coatings in energy storage and generation devices
  • EPD coatings in optoeletronic and magnetic devices and sensors
  • EPD in additive manufacturing of patterns

Prof. Dr. Aldo R. Boccaccini
Prof. Dr. Begoña Ferrari
Prof. Dr. Laxmidhar Besra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrophoretic deposition

  • Colloidal chemistry

  • Electro-dynamics

  • Ceramic coatings

  • Metallic coatings

  • Composite coatings

  • Hybrid coatings

  • Particles assembly

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Graphene Coating on Copper by Electrophoretic Deposition for Corrosion Prevention
Coatings 2017, 7(12), 214; doi:10.3390/coatings7120214
Received: 1 October 2017 / Revised: 20 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 30 November 2017
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Abstract
In this paper, we report the use of a simple and inexpensive electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique to develop thin, uniform, and transparent graphene oxide (GO) coating on copper (Cu) substrate on application of 10 V for 1 s from an aqueous suspension containing
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In this paper, we report the use of a simple and inexpensive electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique to develop thin, uniform, and transparent graphene oxide (GO) coating on copper (Cu) substrate on application of 10 V for 1 s from an aqueous suspension containing 0.03 wt % graphene oxide. GO was partially reduced during the EPD process itself. The GO coated on Cu was completely reduced chemically by using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) solution. The coatings were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), XRD, and UV/VIS spectrophotometry. Corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by electrochemical measurements under accelerated corrosion condition in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution. The GO coated on Cu and chemically reduced by NaBH4 showed more positive corrosion potential (Ecorr) (−145.4 mV) compared to GO coated on Cu (−182.2 mV) and bare Cu (−235.3 mV), and much lower corrosion current (Icorr) (7.01 µA/cm2) when compared to 15.375 µA/cm2 for bare Cu indicating that reduced GO film on copper exhibit enhanced corrosion resistance. The corrosion inhibition efficiency of chemically reduced GO coated Cu was 54.40%, and its corrosion rate was 0.08 mm/year as compared to 0.18 mm/year for bare copper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrophoretic Deposition)
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Open AccessArticle In Situ Synthesis and Electrophoretic Deposition of NiO/Ni Core-Shell Nanoparticles and Its Application as Pseudocapacitor
Coatings 2017, 7(11), 193; doi:10.3390/coatings7110193
Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 30 October 2017 / Accepted: 4 November 2017 / Published: 8 November 2017
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Abstract
A simple, low cost and transferable colloidal processing method and the subsequent heat treatment has been optimized to prepare binder-free electrodes for their application in supercapacitors. NiO/Ni core–shell hybrid nanostructures have been synthetized by heterogeneous precipitation of metallic Ni nanospheres onto NiO nanoplatelets
[...] Read more.
A simple, low cost and transferable colloidal processing method and the subsequent heat treatment has been optimized to prepare binder-free electrodes for their application in supercapacitors. NiO/Ni core–shell hybrid nanostructures have been synthetized by heterogeneous precipitation of metallic Ni nanospheres onto NiO nanoplatelets as seed surfaces. The electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has been used to shape the electroactive material onto 3D substrates such as Ni foams. The method has allowed us to control the growth and the homogeneity of the NiO/Ni coatings. The presence of metallic Nickel in the microstructure and the optimization of the thermal treatment have brought several improvements in the electrochemical response due to the connectivity of the final microstructure. The highest specific capacitance value has been obtained using a thermal treatment of 325 °C during 1 h in Argon. At this temperature, necks formed among ceramic-metallic nanoparticles preserve the structural integrity of the microstructure avoiding the employment of binders to enhance their connectivity. Thus, a compromise between porosity and connectivity should be established to improve electrochemical performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrophoretic Deposition)
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Open AccessArticle Particle Velocities near and along the Electrode during Electrophoretic Deposition: Influence of Surfactant Counter-Ions
Coatings 2017, 7(9), 147; doi:10.3390/coatings7090147
Received: 11 July 2017 / Revised: 4 September 2017 / Accepted: 11 September 2017 / Published: 14 September 2017
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Abstract
Research into the micro-nanostructured coatings process has made a variety of new applications available. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is an efficient and attractive technique to produce coated materials. Therefore the understanding of the formation and growth mechanism of the coating process continues to be
[...] Read more.
Research into the micro-nanostructured coatings process has made a variety of new applications available. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is an efficient and attractive technique to produce coated materials. Therefore the understanding of the formation and growth mechanism of the coating process continues to be investigated. In this study, a home-made EPD laminar flow cell was used for in-situ investigation of the particle velocity and deposition of micronic particles on a cathode. Monodisperse polystyrene latex particles were functionalized with cationic surfactants: cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) or cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC). The tangential velocity of the particles when they migrated to the electrode, the approach angle and the tangential velocity along the electrode were measured under a DC electric field. From the values of the velocities, the particle-electrode distance was evaluated in CTAB and CTAC solutions. The electrophoretic velocity was calculated from the electrophoretic mobility of the particles and the electric field applied to the particles. All these parameters depend on the type of surfactant counter-ions and influence the growth of the coating. Dense structures were obtained in CTAB solution while open structures were observed in CTAC solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrophoretic Deposition)
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Open AccessArticle Electrophoretic Coating of Octahedral Molybdenum Metal Clusters for UV/NIR Light Screening
Coatings 2017, 7(8), 114; doi:10.3390/coatings7080114
Received: 22 May 2017 / Revised: 13 July 2017 / Accepted: 30 July 2017 / Published: 3 August 2017
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Abstract
Thin and transparent Mo6 cluster films with significant optical properties were prepared on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass plates from the suspension of Cs2Mo6Br14 cluster precursors dispersed in methyl-ethyl-ketone (MEK) by an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. Two
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Thin and transparent Mo6 cluster films with significant optical properties were prepared on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass plates from the suspension of Cs2Mo6Br14 cluster precursors dispersed in methyl-ethyl-ketone (MEK) by an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. Two kinds of polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS); i.e., KF-96L-1.5CS and KF-96L-2CS corresponding to the kinetic viscosity of 1.5 and 2 centistokes, respectively, were selected to topcoat the Mo6 cluster film after the EPD. The influence of the PDMS on the durability, chemical compatibility and light absorption property of Mo6 cluster films were characterized by means of field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) spectroscopy. The stabilized PDMS-coated Mo6 cluster film could be stored for more than 6 months under ambient conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrophoretic Deposition)
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