E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Bioactive Glasses 2017"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Francesco Baino

Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino (Italy)
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biomaterials; bioactive glasses; bioceramics; composite materials; tissue engineering; porous materials
Guest Editor
Prof. Aldo R. Boccaccini

Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen, Germany; Visiting Professor, Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BP, UK
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +49 9131 85 28602
Interests: biomaterials; porous materials; scaffolds; tissue engineering; bioactive glasses; composite materials; waste recycling; carbon nanotubes; electrophoretic deposition; vascularization; bioceramics; biofabrication; bioactive coatings; drug delivery
Guest Editor
Prof. Enrica Verné

Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino (Italy)
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biomaterials; bioactive glasses; antibacterial materials; surface functionalization; magnetic materials; nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For centuries, glass has played an important role in the practical and aesthetic aspects of our lives and culture. Some special types of glass have revolutionized medicine since Larry Hench invented 45S5 Bioglass®, almost 50 years ago, at the University of Florida. This material was the first able to bond to bone, forming a tight interface, and launched our modern idea of biomaterials science. Many other bioactive glass compositions have been developed over the years, which have controllable degradation rates, so that glass implant dissolution can be closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of metal elements that, once released, are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth (e.g., Sr) or to elicit a therapeutic effect, such as antibacterial properties (e.g., Ag).

Recent advances in biomaterials processing have led to the creation of functional coatings, 3D porous scaffolds, fibrous constructs, and moldable implants with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the repair of both load-bearing and non-loaded bone. Furthermore, emerging applications of bioactive glasses in contact with soft tissues are increasingly attracting the interest of researchers. Recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glasses to promote angiogenesis, which is a critical requirement for promoting both bone and soft tissue regeneration, such as wound healing. Surface functionalization and incorporation in composite biomaterials are valuable strategies to develop bioactive glass-based systems for the local delivery of drugs and therapeutic biomolecules, which are key for the treatment of a number of diseases ranging from chronic infections to malignant tumors.

In summary, new and continuous advances in bioactive glass processing technologies and novel applications of biomedical glasses in tissue engineering and advanced therapy bring further honor to the long history of glass in medicine and open unexpected scenarios for patient’s treatment and rehabilitation.

It is, therefore, our immense pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for the Special Issue, “Bioactive Glasses 2017”. Full research articles, short communications and comprehensive review papers covering all aspects of design, processing, characterization, modelling and applications of bioactive glasses are welcome.

Francesco Baino
Aldo R. Boccaccini
Enrica Verné
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bioactive glasses
  • Silicate glasses
  • Borate glasses
  • Phosphate glasses
  • Composites
  • Hybrids
  • Bioactivity
  • Scaffolds
  • Coatings
  • Additive manufacturing
  • Surface functionalization
  • Modelling
  • Tissue engineering
  • Drug delivery
  • Ion release

Published Papers (7 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-7
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Monitoring the Formation of Hydroxyapatite Porous Layers
Materials 2017, 10(12), 1395; doi:10.3390/ma10121395
Received: 15 November 2017 / Revised: 2 December 2017 / Accepted: 4 December 2017 / Published: 6 December 2017
PDF Full-text (2285 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to characterize the formation of porous hydroxyapatite layers on the surface of 0.8CaSiO3-0.2Ca3(PO4)2 biocompatible eutectic glass immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF). Compositional and structural characterization analyses were also conducted
[...] Read more.
Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to characterize the formation of porous hydroxyapatite layers on the surface of 0.8CaSiO3-0.2Ca3(PO4)2 biocompatible eutectic glass immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF). Compositional and structural characterization analyses were also conducted by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses 2017)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Micro-Computed-Tomography-Guided Analysis of In Vitro Structural Modifications in Two Types of 45S5 Bioactive Glass Based Scaffolds
Materials 2017, 10(12), 1341; doi:10.3390/ma10121341
Received: 23 October 2017 / Revised: 19 November 2017 / Accepted: 20 November 2017 / Published: 23 November 2017
PDF Full-text (1570 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Three-dimensional 45S5 bioactive glass (BG)-based scaffolds are being investigated for bone regeneration. Besides structural properties, controlled time-dependent alteration of scaffold morphology is crucial to achieve optimal scaffold characteristics for successful bone repair. There is no in vitro evidence concerning the dependence between structural
[...] Read more.
Three-dimensional 45S5 bioactive glass (BG)-based scaffolds are being investigated for bone regeneration. Besides structural properties, controlled time-dependent alteration of scaffold morphology is crucial to achieve optimal scaffold characteristics for successful bone repair. There is no in vitro evidence concerning the dependence between structural characteristics and dissolution behavior of 45S5 BG-based scaffolds of different morphology. In this study, the dissolution behavior of scaffolds fabricated by the foam replica method using polyurethane foam (Group A) and maritime sponge Spongia Agaricina (Group B) as sacrificial templates was analyzed by micro-computed-tomography (µCT). The scaffolds were immersed in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium for 56 days under static cell culture conditions and underwent µCT-analysis initially, and after 7, 14, and 56 days. Group A showed high porosity (91%) and trabecular structure formed by macro-pores (average diameter 692 µm ± 72 µm). Group-B-scaffolds were less porous (51%), revealing an optimal pore size distribution within the window of 110–500 µm pore size diameter, combined with superior mechanical stability. Both groups showed similar structural alteration upon immersion. Surface area and scaffold volume increased whilst density decreased, reflecting initial dissolution followed by hydroxycarbonate-apatite-layer-formation on the scaffold surfaces. In vitro- and/or in vivo-testing of cell-seeded BG-scaffolds used in this study should be performed to evaluate the BG-scaffolds’ time-dependent osteogenic properties in relation to the measured in vitro structural changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses 2017)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Effect of Alumina Incorporation on the Surface Mineralization and Degradation of a Bioactive Glass (CaO-MgO-SiO2-Na2O-P2O5-CaF2)-Glycerol Paste
Materials 2017, 10(11), 1324; doi:10.3390/ma10111324
Received: 12 October 2017 / Revised: 13 November 2017 / Accepted: 15 November 2017 / Published: 18 November 2017
PDF Full-text (1972 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study investigates the dissolution behavior as well as the surface biomineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF) of a paste composed of glycerol (gly) and a bioactive glass in the system CaO-MgO-SiO2-Na2O-P2O5-CaF2 (BG). The
[...] Read more.
This study investigates the dissolution behavior as well as the surface biomineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF) of a paste composed of glycerol (gly) and a bioactive glass in the system CaO-MgO-SiO2-Na2O-P2O5-CaF2 (BG). The synthesis of the bioactive glass in an alumina crucible has been shown to significantly affect its bioactivity due to the incorporation of aluminum (ca. 1.3–1.4 wt %) into the glass network. Thus, the kinetics of the hydroxyapatite (HA) mineralization on the glass prepared in the alumina crucible was found to be slower than that reported for the same glass composition prepared in a Pt crucible. It is considered that the synthesis conditions lead to the incorporation of small amount of aluminum into the BG network and thus delay the HA mineralization. Interestingly, the BG-gly paste was shown to have significantly higher bioactivity than that of the as-prepared BG. Structural analysis of the paste indicate that glycerol chemically interacts with the glass surface and strongly alter the glass network architecture, thus generating a more depolymerized network, as well as an increased amount of silanol groups at the surface of the glass. In particular, BG-gly paste features early intermediate calcite precipitation during immersion in SBF, followed by hydroxyapatite formation after ca. seven days of SBF exposure; whereas the HA mineralization seems to be suppressed in BG, probably a consequence of the incorporation of aluminum into the glass network. The results obtained within the present study reveal the positive effect of using pastes based on bioactive glasses and organic carriers (here alcohols) which may be of interest not only due to their advantageous visco-elastic properties, but also due to the possibility of enhancing the glass bioactivity upon surface interactions with the organic carrier. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses 2017)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle In Vitro Degradation of Borosilicate Bioactive Glass and Poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) Composite Scaffolds
Materials 2017, 10(11), 1274; doi:10.3390/ma10111274
Received: 26 September 2017 / Revised: 30 October 2017 / Accepted: 1 November 2017 / Published: 6 November 2017
PDF Full-text (3101 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Composite scaffolds were obtained by mixing various amounts (10, 30 and 50 weight % [wt %]) of borosilicate bioactive glass and poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) copolymer. The composites were foamed using supercritical CO2. An increase in the glass content led to
[...] Read more.
Composite scaffolds were obtained by mixing various amounts (10, 30 and 50 weight % [wt %]) of borosilicate bioactive glass and poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) copolymer. The composites were foamed using supercritical CO2. An increase in the glass content led to a decrease in the pore size and density. In vitro dissolution/reaction test was performed in simulated body fluid. As a function of immersion time, the solution pH increased due to the glass dissolution. This was further supported by the increasing amount of Ca in the immersing solution with increasing immersion time and glass content. Furthermore, the change in scaffold mass was significantly greater with increasing the glass content in the scaffold. However, only the scaffolds containing 30 and 50 wt % of glasses exhibited significant hydroxyapatite (HA) formation at 72 h of immersion. The compression strength of the samples was also measured. The Young’s modulus was similar for the 10 and 30 wt % glass-containing scaffolds whereas it increased to 90 MPa for the 50 wt % glass containing scaffold. Upon immersion up to 72 h, the Young’s modulus increased and then remained constant for longer immersion times. The scaffold prepared could have great potential for bone and cartilage regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses 2017)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Mesoporous Bioactive Glass Functionalized 3D Ti-6Al-4V Scaffolds with Improved Surface Bioactivity
Materials 2017, 10(11), 1244; doi:10.3390/ma10111244
Received: 6 September 2017 / Revised: 30 September 2017 / Accepted: 26 October 2017 / Published: 27 October 2017
PDF Full-text (12116 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Porous Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds fabricated by means of selective laser melting (SLM), having controllable geometrical features and preferable mechanical properties, have been developed as a class of biomaterials that hold promising potential for bone repair. However, the inherent bio-inertness of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy as
[...] Read more.
Porous Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds fabricated by means of selective laser melting (SLM), having controllable geometrical features and preferable mechanical properties, have been developed as a class of biomaterials that hold promising potential for bone repair. However, the inherent bio-inertness of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy as the matrix of the scaffolds results in a lack in the ability to stimulate bone ingrowth and regeneration. The aim of the present study was to develop a bioactive coating on the struts of SLM Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds in order to add the desired surface osteogenesis ability. Mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs) coating was applied on the strut surfaces of the SLM Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds through spin coating, followed by a heat treatment. It was found that the coating could maintain the characteristic mesoporous structure and chemical composition of MBG, and establish good interfacial adhesion to the Ti-6Al-4V substrate. The compressive strength and pore interconnectivity of the scaffolds were not affected by the coating. Moreover, the results obtained from in vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated that the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) on the MBG-coated Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds were improved as compared with those on the conventional bioactive glass (BG)-coated Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds and bare-metal Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds. Our results demonstrated that the MBG coating by using the spinning coating method could be an effective approach to achieving enhanced surface biofunctionalization for SLM Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses 2017)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle In Vitro Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Response to Ionic Dissolution Products from Lithium-Containing 45S5 Bioactive Glass
Materials 2017, 10(7), 740; doi:10.3390/ma10070740
Received: 1 June 2017 / Revised: 24 June 2017 / Accepted: 29 June 2017 / Published: 3 July 2017
PDF Full-text (2136 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Since lithium (Li+) plays roles in angiogenesis, the localized and controlled release of Li+ ions from bioactive glasses (BGs) represents a promising alternative therapy for the regeneration and repair of tissues with a high degree of vascularization. Here, microparticles from
[...] Read more.
Since lithium (Li+) plays roles in angiogenesis, the localized and controlled release of Li+ ions from bioactive glasses (BGs) represents a promising alternative therapy for the regeneration and repair of tissues with a high degree of vascularization. Here, microparticles from a base 45S5 BG composition containing (wt %) 45% SiO2, 24.5% Na2O, 24.5% CaO, and 6% P2O5, in which Na2O was partially substituted by 5% Li2O (45S5.5Li), were obtained. The results demonstrate that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) have greater migratory and proliferative response and ability to form tubules in vitro after stimulation with the ionic dissolution products (IDPs) of the 45S5.5Li BG. The results also show the activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the increase in expression of proangiogenic cytokines insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ). We conclude that the IDPs of 45S5.5Li BG would act as useful inorganic agents to improve tissue repair and regeneration, ultimately stimulating HUVECs behavior in the absence of exogenous growth factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses 2017)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Potential of Bioactive Glasses for Cardiac and Pulmonary Tissue Engineering
Materials 2017, 10(12), 1429; doi:10.3390/ma10121429 (registering DOI)
Received: 23 October 2017 / Revised: 11 December 2017 / Accepted: 12 December 2017 / Published: 15 December 2017
PDF Full-text (11331 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Repair and regeneration of disorders affecting cardiac and pulmonary tissues through tissue-engineering-based approaches is currently of particular interest. On this matter, different families of bioactive glasses (BGs) have recently been given much consideration with respect to treating refractory diseases of these tissues, such
[...] Read more.
Repair and regeneration of disorders affecting cardiac and pulmonary tissues through tissue-engineering-based approaches is currently of particular interest. On this matter, different families of bioactive glasses (BGs) have recently been given much consideration with respect to treating refractory diseases of these tissues, such as myocardial infarction. The inherent properties of BGs, including their ability to bond to hard and soft tissues, to stimulate angiogenesis, and to elicit antimicrobial effects, along with their excellent biocompatibility, support these newly proposed strategies. Moreover, BGs can also act as a bioactive reinforcing phase to finely tune the mechanical properties of polymer-based constructs used to repair the damaged cardiac and pulmonary tissues. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of different forms of BGs, alone or in combination with other materials (e.g., polymers), in regards to repair and regenerate injured tissues of cardiac and pulmonary systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses 2017)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top