Special Issue "Advances in Dental Biomaterials and Coatings"

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A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. William A. Brantley (Website)

College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, 3005L Postle Hall, 305 W. 12th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Interests: structure-property relationships for high-palladium dental alloys; hydroxyapatite-coated titanium dental implants; orthodontic materials; thermal analysis of elastomeric dental materials; biological properties of dental materials; applications of materials science principles to the study of biomaterials; nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics and endodontics; new biomedical titanium alloys; laser sintering and laser deposition of metallic dental materials; metal-ceramic bonding for dental applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

One of the most active areas of current research in dental biomaterials is the use of special coatings to impart properties that are not available with the underlying substrate materials. The traditional area of utilizing thin layers of dental ceramics bonded to alloy substrates to match the appearance of the underlying tooth structure for metal-ceramic restorations is evolving as new processing techniques and materials are being developed. A major current area with a very large number of published articles is the development of special coatings for dental implants that provide bioactive properties and improved osseointegration with the adjacent bone, yielding superior clinical performance. Exciting new processing techniques and the incorporation of biological species are being intensively pursued for coatings on these implants. Other recent dental materials research on coatings has been reported for orthodontic and restorative dentistry applications. The goal of this special issue is to present the major current areas of research and development in coatings for dental materials and to indicate future directions where research is needed, along with the presentation of relevant scientific principles. Opportunities abound for interdisciplinary work in coatings research that will yield much improved dental materials for future patient populations.

Prof. Dr. William A. Brantley
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • Dental materials
  • CoatingsMetal-ceramic dental restorations
  • Dental implants
  • Biological activity
  • Nanostructure materials
  • Biomimetic materials
  • Processing techniques

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Cellulose Nanofibre Mesh for Use in Dental Materials
Coatings 2012, 2(3), 120-137; doi:10.3390/coatings2030120
Received: 17 April 2012 / Revised: 2 July 2012 / Accepted: 2 July 2012 / Published: 11 July 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2015 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this study was to produce a 3D mesh of defect free electrospun cellulose acetate nanofibres and to use this to produce a prototype composite resin containing nanofibre fillers. This might find use as an aesthetic orthodontic bracket material or [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to produce a 3D mesh of defect free electrospun cellulose acetate nanofibres and to use this to produce a prototype composite resin containing nanofibre fillers. This might find use as an aesthetic orthodontic bracket material or composite veneer for restorative dentistry. In this laboratory based study cellulose acetate was dissolved in an acetone and dimethylacetamide solvent solution and electrospun. The spinning parameters were optimised and lithium chloride added to the solution to produce a self supporting nanofibre mesh. This mesh was then silane coated and infiltrated with either epoxy resin or an unfilled Bis-GMA resin. The flexural strength of the produced samples was measured and compared to that of unfilled resin samples. Using this method cellulose acetate nanofibres were successfully electrospun in the 286 nm range. However, resin infiltration of this mesh resulted in samples with a flexural strength less than that of the unfilled control samples. Air inclusion during preparation and incomplete wetting of the nanofibre mesh was thought to cause this reduction in flexural strength. Further work is required to reduce the air inclusions before the true effect of resin reinforcement with a 3D mesh of cellulose acetate nanofibres can be determined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dental Biomaterials and Coatings)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Coating and Surface Treatments on Orthodontic Metallic Materials
Coatings 2013, 3(1), 1-15; doi:10.3390/coatings3010001
Received: 12 November 2012 / Revised: 14 December 2012 / Accepted: 21 December 2012 / Published: 27 December 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (192 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Metallic biomaterials have been extensively used in orthodontics throughout history. Gold, stainless steel, cobalt-chromium alloys, titanium and its alloys, among other metallic biomaterials, have been part of the orthodontic armamentarium since the twentieth century. Metals and alloys possess outstanding properties and offer [...] Read more.
Metallic biomaterials have been extensively used in orthodontics throughout history. Gold, stainless steel, cobalt-chromium alloys, titanium and its alloys, among other metallic biomaterials, have been part of the orthodontic armamentarium since the twentieth century. Metals and alloys possess outstanding properties and offer numerous possibilities for the fabrication of orthodontic devices such as brackets, wires, bands, ligatures, among others. However, these materials have drawbacks that can present problems for the orthodontist. Poor friction control, allergic reactions, and metal ionic release are some of the most common disadvantages found when using metallic alloys for manufacturing orthodontic appliances. In order to overcome such weaknesses, research has been conducted aiming at different approaches, such as coatings and surface treatments, which have been developed to render these materials more suitable for orthodontic applications. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the coating and surface treatment methods performed on metallic biomaterials used in orthodontics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dental Biomaterials and Coatings)
Open AccessReview Protection and Reinforcement of Tooth Structures by Dental Coating Materials
Coatings 2012, 2(4), 210-220; doi:10.3390/coatings2040210
Received: 11 June 2012 / Revised: 5 September 2012 / Accepted: 12 September 2012 / Published: 1 October 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1109 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
It has been proposed that a resin coating can serve as a means to protect dental structure after preparation of the tooth for indirect restorations, sealing the exposed dentin. The resin coating is applied on the cut surfaces immediately after tooth preparation [...] Read more.
It has been proposed that a resin coating can serve as a means to protect dental structure after preparation of the tooth for indirect restorations, sealing the exposed dentin. The resin coating is applied on the cut surfaces immediately after tooth preparation and before making an impression by assembling a dentin bonding system and a flowable composite. Resin coatings minimize pulp irritation and improve the bond strength between a resin cement and tooth when bonding the restoration to tooth. Recently, thin-film coating dental materials based on all-in-one adhesive technology were introduced for resin coating of indirect restorations. The thin coating materials are applied in a single clinical step and create a barrier-like film layer on the prepared dentin. The thin coatings play an important role in protecting the dentin from physical, chemical, and biological irritation. In addition, these thin-film coating materials reportedly prevent marginal leakage beneath inlays or crown restorations. In light of the many benefits provided by such a protective layer, these all-in-one adhesive materials may therefore also have the potential to cover exposed root dentin surfaces and prevent caries formation. In this paper, recent progress of the dental coating materials and their clinical applications are reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dental Biomaterials and Coatings)
Open AccessReview Coatings in Dentistry—A Review of Some Basic Principles
Coatings 2012, 2(3), 138-159; doi:10.3390/coatings2030138
Received: 8 May 2012 / Revised: 11 June 2012 / Accepted: 6 July 2012 / Published: 26 July 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (671 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Different coatings are used in dentistry in an attempt to prevent caries, improve bonding of restorative materials to tooth tissues, and coat implant surfaces in efforts to speed up osseointegration. These are just a few of the many coating applications used in [...] Read more.
Different coatings are used in dentistry in an attempt to prevent caries, improve bonding of restorative materials to tooth tissues, and coat implant surfaces in efforts to speed up osseointegration. These are just a few of the many coating applications used in dentistry. The intention of this review is not to cover the entire field of different coatings used in dentistry, because that topic is just too big to be covered in one single paper. Therefore, this review aims to highlight some fundamental coating principles and present these principles to an audience consisting mainly of dentists. To do so, this review will focus on the fundamental principles of coatings, namely surface properties/adhesives in general, since these topics form the foundation for most coating procedures used in dentistry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dental Biomaterials and Coatings)
Open AccessReview Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials
Coatings 2012, 2(3), 160-178; doi:10.3390/coatings2030160
Received: 4 May 2012 / Revised: 2 July 2012 / Accepted: 3 July 2012 / Published: 26 July 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (295 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have [...] Read more.
Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dental Biomaterials and Coatings)
Open AccessReview Plant Products for Innovative Biomaterials in Dentistry
Coatings 2012, 2(3), 179-194; doi:10.3390/coatings2030179
Received: 11 May 2012 / Revised: 7 June 2012 / Accepted: 5 July 2012 / Published: 26 July 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (137 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dental biomaterials and natural products represent two of the main growing research fields, revealing plant-derived compounds may play a role not only as nutraceuticals in affecting oral health, but also in improving physico-chemical properties of biomaterials used in dentistry. Therefore, our aim [...] Read more.
Dental biomaterials and natural products represent two of the main growing research fields, revealing plant-derived compounds may play a role not only as nutraceuticals in affecting oral health, but also in improving physico-chemical properties of biomaterials used in dentistry. Therefore, our aim was to collect all available data concerning the utilization of plant polysaccharides, proteins and extracts rich in bioactive phytochemicals in enhancing performance of dental biomaterials. Although compelling evidences are suggestive of a great potential of plant products in promoting material-tissue/cell interface, to date, only few authors have investigated their use in development of innovative dental biomaterials. A small number of studies have reported plant extract-based titanium implant coatings and periodontal regenerative materials. To the best of our knowledge, this review is the first to deal with this topic, highlighting a general lack of research findings in an interesting field which still needs to be investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dental Biomaterials and Coatings)

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