E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Michael Henein

Department of Public Health and Clinical Medical and Heart Center, Umea University, 901 87 Umea, Sweden; St George University London, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: non-invasive cardiology; echocardiography; coronary artery disease imaging; carotid atherosclerosis; valve disease and heart failure

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the recent globalisation of life style in many parts of the world, atheroscleosis has become a global disease with a significant health threat and economic burden, not only in the West, but now also Asia and Africa. Despite the well documented conventional risk factors for atherosclerosis, little is known about the major differences between geographical regions and whether the effect of those factors remains at a similar level of impact in all nations. This also raises the question about the exact pathomechanism of atherosclerosis and if it is uniform or may have different pathways between continents and countries. Furthermore, whether the pattern of gross pathology, e.g., thickened intima-media, plaque formation, calcification, etc., has become amenable to study and to accurately analyse, is not known; is it nation specific?

This Special Issue of IJMS searches for answers to some of the above-mentioned questions in an attempt to provide cardiology and vascular specialists with some answers that should lead to a better understanding of such a serious universal disease. We look forward to your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Michael  Henein
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Coronary calcification
  • Arterial disease
  • Inflammation
  • Pathomechanism of atherosclerosis

Related Special Issues

Published Papers (10 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-10
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Anti-Atherogenic Effects of Vaspin on Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cell/Macrophage Responses and Hyperlipidemic Mouse Plaque Phenotype
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(6), 1732; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19061732
Received: 25 April 2018 / Revised: 6 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
PDF Full-text (5139 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Vaspin (visceral adipose tissue-derived serine protease inhibitor) was recently identified as a novel adipocytokine with insulin-sensitizing effects. Serum vaspin levels are reported either increased or decreased in patients with coronary artery disease. Our translational research was performed to evaluate the expression of vaspin
[...] Read more.
Vaspin (visceral adipose tissue-derived serine protease inhibitor) was recently identified as a novel adipocytokine with insulin-sensitizing effects. Serum vaspin levels are reported either increased or decreased in patients with coronary artery disease. Our translational research was performed to evaluate the expression of vaspin in human coronary atherosclerotic lesions, and its effects on atherogenic responses in human macrophages and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC), as well as aortic atherosclerotic lesion development in spontaneously hyperlipidemic Apoe−/− mice, an animal model of atherosclerosis. Vaspin was expressed at high levels in macrophages/vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) within human coronary atheromatous plaques. Vaspin significantly suppressed inflammatory phenotypes with nuclear factor κB down-regulation in human macrophages. Vaspin significantly suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced foam cell formation with CD36 and acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 down-regulation and ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1, and scavenger receptor class B type 1 up-regulation in human macrophages. Vaspin significantly suppressed angiotensin II-induced migration and proliferation with ERK1/2 and JNK down-regulation, and increased collagen production with phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt up-regulation in HASMCs. Chronic infusion of vaspin into Apoe−/− mice significantly suppressed the development of aortic atherosclerotic lesions, with significant reductions of intraplaque inflammation and the macrophage/VSMC ratio, a marker of plaque instability. Our study indicates that vaspin prevents atherosclerotic plaque formation and instability, and may serve as a novel therapeutic target in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Adropin Contributes to Anti-Atherosclerosis by Suppressing Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(5), 1293; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19051293
Received: 1 April 2018 / Revised: 18 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 26 April 2018
PDF Full-text (2804 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Adropin, a peptide hormone expressed in liver and brain, is known to improve insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Serum levels of adropin are negatively associated with the severity of coronary artery disease. However, it remains unknown whether adropin could modulate atherogenesis. We assessed
[...] Read more.
Adropin, a peptide hormone expressed in liver and brain, is known to improve insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Serum levels of adropin are negatively associated with the severity of coronary artery disease. However, it remains unknown whether adropin could modulate atherogenesis. We assessed the effects of adropin on inflammatory molecule expression and human THP1 monocyte adhesion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), foam cell formation in THP1 monocyte-derived macrophages, and the migration and proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in vitro and atherogenesis in Apoe−/− mice in vivo. Adropin was expressed in THP1 monocytes, their derived macrophages, HASMCs, and HUVECs. Adropin suppressed tumor necrosis factor α-induced THP1 monocyte adhesion to HUVECs, which was associated with vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 downregulation in HUVECs. Adropin shifted the phenotype to anti-inflammatory M2 rather than pro-inflammatory M1 via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ upregulation during monocyte differentiation into macrophages. Adropin had no significant effects on oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced foam cell formation in macrophages. In HASMCs, adropin suppressed the migration and proliferation without inducing apoptosis via ERK1/2 and Bax downregulation and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/Bcl2 upregulation. Chronic administration of adropin to Apoe−/− mice attenuated the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta, with reduced the intra-plaque monocyte/macrophage infiltration and smooth muscle cell content. Thus, adropin could serve as a novel therapeutic target in atherosclerosis and related diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Cytokine Disturbances in Coronary Artery Ectasia Do Not Support Atherosclerosis Pathogenesis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(1), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19010260
Received: 28 October 2017 / Revised: 10 January 2018 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 16 January 2018
PDF Full-text (604 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Background: Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) is a rare disorder commonly associated with additional features of atherosclerosis. In the present study, we aimed to examine the systemic immune-inflammatory response that might associate CAE. Methods: Plasma samples were obtained from 16 patients with coronary artery
[...] Read more.
Background: Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) is a rare disorder commonly associated with additional features of atherosclerosis. In the present study, we aimed to examine the systemic immune-inflammatory response that might associate CAE. Methods: Plasma samples were obtained from 16 patients with coronary artery ectasia (mean age 64.9 ± 7.3 years, 6 female), 69 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and angiographic evidence for atherosclerosis (age 64.5 ± 8.7 years, 41 female), and 140 controls (mean age 58.6 ± 4.1 years, 40 female) with normal coronary arteries. Samples were analyzed at Umeå University Biochemistry Laboratory, Sweden, using the V-PLEX Pro-Inflammatory Panel 1 (human) Kit. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between patient groups and controls were determined using Mann–Whitney U-tests. Results: The CAE patients had significantly higher plasma levels of INF-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8 (p = 0.007, 0.01, 0.001, and 0.002, respectively), and lower levels of IL-2 and IL-4 (p < 0.001 for both) compared to CAD patients and controls. The plasma levels of IL-10, IL-12p, and IL-13 were not different between the three groups. None of these markers could differentiate between patients with pure (n = 6) and mixed with minimal atherosclerosis (n = 10) CAE. Conclusions: These results indicate an enhanced systemic pro-inflammatory response in CAE. The profile of this response indicates activation of macrophages through a pathway and trigger different from those of atherosclerosis immune inflammatory response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Anti-Atherosclerotic Action of Agmatine in ApoE-Knockout Mice
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(8), 1706; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18081706
Received: 10 July 2017 / Revised: 31 July 2017 / Accepted: 1 August 2017 / Published: 4 August 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6232 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease in which dysfunction of mitochondria play an important role, and disorders of lipid management intensify this process. Agmatine, an endogenous polyamine formed by decarboxylation of arginine, exerts a protective effect on mitochondria and modulates fatty acid metabolism. We
[...] Read more.
Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease in which dysfunction of mitochondria play an important role, and disorders of lipid management intensify this process. Agmatine, an endogenous polyamine formed by decarboxylation of arginine, exerts a protective effect on mitochondria and modulates fatty acid metabolism. We investigated the effect of exogenous agmatine on the development of atherosclerosis and changes in lipid profile in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE-/-) mice. Agmatine caused an approximate 40% decrease of atherosclerotic lesions, as estimated by en face and cross-section methods with an influence on macrophage but not on smooth muscle content in the plaques. Agmatine treatment did not changed gelatinase activity within the plaque area. What is more, the action of agmatine was associated with an increase in the number of high density lipoproteins (HDL) in blood. Real-Time PCR analysis showed that agmatine modulates liver mRNA levels of many factors involved in oxidation of fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry identified 27 differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins upon agmatine treatment in the liver of apoE-/- mice, mostly proteins related to metabolism and apoptosis. In conclusion, prolonged administration of agmatine inhibits atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice; however, the exact mechanisms linking observed changes and elevations of HDL plasma require further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle The SGLT2 Inhibitor Luseogliflozin Rapidly Normalizes Aortic mRNA Levels of Inflammation-Related but Not Lipid-Metabolism-Related Genes and Suppresses Atherosclerosis in Diabetic ApoE KO Mice
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(8), 1704; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18081704
Received: 21 June 2017 / Revised: 1 August 2017 / Accepted: 2 August 2017 / Published: 4 August 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2569 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recent clinical studies have revealed the treatment of diabetic patients with sodium glucose co-transporter2 (SGLT2) inhibitors to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events. Using nicotinamide and streptozotocin (NA/STZ) -treated ApoE KO mice, we investigated the effects of short-term (seven days) treatment with the
[...] Read more.
Recent clinical studies have revealed the treatment of diabetic patients with sodium glucose co-transporter2 (SGLT2) inhibitors to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events. Using nicotinamide and streptozotocin (NA/STZ) -treated ApoE KO mice, we investigated the effects of short-term (seven days) treatment with the SGLT2 inhibitor luseogliflozin on mRNA levels related to atherosclerosis in the aorta, as well as examining the long-term (six months) effects on atherosclerosis development. Eight-week-old ApoE KO mice were treated with NA/STZ to induce diabetes mellitus, and then divided into two groups, either untreated, or treated with luseogliflozin. Seven days after the initiation of luseogliflozin administration, atherosclerosis-related mRNA levels in the aorta were compared among four groups; i.e., wild type C57/BL6J, native ApoE KO, and NA/STZ-treated ApoE KO mice, with or without luseogliflozin. Short-term luseogliflozin treatment normalized the expression of inflammation-related genes such as F4/80, TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, ICAM-1, PECAM-1, MMP2 and MMP9 in the NA/STZ-treated ApoE KO mice, which showed marked elevations as compared with untreated ApoE KO mice. In contrast, lipid metabolism-related genes were generally unaffected by luseogliflozin treatment. Furthermore, after six-month treatment with luseogliflozin, in contrast to the severe and widely distributed atherosclerotic changes in the aortas of NA/STZ-treated ApoE KO mice, luseogliflozin treatment markedly attenuated the progression of atherosclerosis, without affecting serum lipid parameters such as high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels. Given that luseogliflozin normalized the aortic mRNA levels of inflammation-related, but not lipid-related, genes soon after the initiation of treatment, it is not unreasonable to speculate that the anti-atherosclerotic effect of this SGLT2 inhibitor emerges rapidly, possibly via the prevention of inflammation rather than of hyperlipidemia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview ALUminating the Path of Atherosclerosis Progression: Chaos Theory Suggests a Role for Alu Repeats in the Development of Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(6), 1734; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19061734
Received: 20 May 2018 / Revised: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 9 June 2018 / Published: 12 June 2018
PDF Full-text (664 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Atherosclerosis (ATH) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are chronic inflammatory diseases with an important genetic background; they derive from the cumulative effect of multiple common risk alleles, most of which are located in genomic noncoding regions. These complex diseases behave as nonlinear dynamical
[...] Read more.
Atherosclerosis (ATH) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are chronic inflammatory diseases with an important genetic background; they derive from the cumulative effect of multiple common risk alleles, most of which are located in genomic noncoding regions. These complex diseases behave as nonlinear dynamical systems that show a high dependence on their initial conditions; thus, long-term predictions of disease progression are unreliable. One likely possibility is that the nonlinear nature of ATH could be dependent on nonlinear correlations in the structure of the human genome. In this review, we show how chaos theory analysis has highlighted genomic regions that have shared specific structural constraints, which could have a role in ATH progression. These regions were shown to be enriched with repetitive sequences of the Alu family, genomic parasites that have colonized the human genome, which show a particular secondary structure and are involved in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we show the impact of Alu elements on the mechanisms that regulate gene expression, especially highlighting the molecular mechanisms via which the Alu elements alter the inflammatory response. We devote special attention to their relationship with the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA); antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), a risk factor for ATH; their role as microRNA (miRNA) sponges; and their ability to interfere with the regulatory circuitry of the (nuclear factor kappa B) NF-κB response. We aim to characterize ATH as a nonlinear dynamic system, in which small initial alterations in the expression of a number of repetitive elements are somehow amplified to reach phenotypic significance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Signaling in Atherogenesis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(6), 1607; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19061607
Received: 4 May 2018 / Revised: 25 May 2018 / Accepted: 28 May 2018 / Published: 30 May 2018
PDF Full-text (15004 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of global mortality and atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of most CVD. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cardiovascular risk factors promote the development of atherosclerosis are not well understood. The development of new efficient
[...] Read more.
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of global mortality and atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of most CVD. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cardiovascular risk factors promote the development of atherosclerosis are not well understood. The development of new efficient therapies to directly block or slow disease progression will require a better understanding of these mechanisms. Accumulating evidence supports a role for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in all stages of the developing atherosclerotic lesion however, it was not clear how ER stress may contribute to disease progression. Recent findings have shown that ER stress signaling through glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3α may significantly contribute to macrophage lipid accumulation, inflammatory cytokine production and M1macrophage polarization. In this review we summarize our knowledge of the potential role of ER stress-GSK3 signaling in the development and progression of atherosclerosis as well as the possible therapeutic implications of this pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview Caloric Restriction and Its Effect on Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Variability and Arterial Stiffness and Dilatation: A Review of the Evidence
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(3), 751; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19030751
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 27 February 2018 / Accepted: 2 March 2018 / Published: 7 March 2018
PDF Full-text (609 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Essential hypertension, fast heart rate, low heart rate variability, sympathetic nervous system dominance over parasympathetic, arterial stiffness, endothelial dysfunction and poor flow-mediated arterial dilatation are all associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. This review of randomised controlled trials and other studies demonstrates that
[...] Read more.
Essential hypertension, fast heart rate, low heart rate variability, sympathetic nervous system dominance over parasympathetic, arterial stiffness, endothelial dysfunction and poor flow-mediated arterial dilatation are all associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. This review of randomised controlled trials and other studies demonstrates that caloric restriction (CR) is capable of significantly improving all these parameters, normalising blood pressure (BP) and allowing patients to discontinue antihypertensive medication, while never becoming hypotensive. CR appears to be effective regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, weight, body mass index (BMI) or a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes, but the greatest benefit is usually observed in the sickest subjects and BP may continue to improve during the refeeding period. Exercise enhances the effects of CR only in hypertensive subjects. There is as yet no consensus on the mechanism of effect of CR and it may be multifactorial. Several studies have suggested that improvement in BP is related to improvement in insulin sensitivity, as well as increased nitric oxide production through improved endothelial function. In addition, CR is known to induce SIRT1, a nutrient sensor, which is linked to a number of beneficial effects in the body. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Emerging Roles of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Stimulated Gene-6 in the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Atherosclerosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(2), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19020465
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 30 January 2018 / Published: 5 February 2018
PDF Full-text (3286 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is a 35-kDa glycoprotein that has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models of arthritis, acute myocardial infarction, and acute cerebral infarction. Several lines of evidence have shed light on the pathophysiological roles of TSG-6 in
[...] Read more.
Tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is a 35-kDa glycoprotein that has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models of arthritis, acute myocardial infarction, and acute cerebral infarction. Several lines of evidence have shed light on the pathophysiological roles of TSG-6 in atherosclerosis. TSG-6 suppresses inflammatory responses of endothelial cells, neutrophils, and macrophages as well as macrophage foam cell formation and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation. Exogenous TSG-6 infusion and endogenous TSG-6 attenuation with a neutralizing antibody for four weeks retards and accelerates, respectively, the development of aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice. TSG-6 also decreases the macrophage/VSMC ratio (a marker of plaque instability) and promotes collagen fibers in atheromatous plaques. In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), plasma TSG-6 levels are increased and TSG-6 is abundantly expressed in the fibrous cap within coronary atheromatous plaques, indicating that TSG-6 increases to counteract the progression of atherosclerosis and stabilize the plaque. These findings indicate that endogenous TSG-6 enhancement and exogenous TSG-6 replacement treatments are expected to emerge as new lines of therapy against atherosclerosis and related CAD. Therefore, this review provides support for the clinical utility of TSG-6 in the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview New Insights into the Role of Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(10), 2034; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18102034
Received: 7 September 2017 / Revised: 19 September 2017 / Accepted: 19 September 2017 / Published: 22 September 2017
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1496 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of lipids, smooth muscle cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, necrosis, fibrosis, and local inflammation. Immune and inflammatory responses have significant effects on every phase of atherosclerosis, and increasing evidence shows that immunity plays a
[...] Read more.
Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of lipids, smooth muscle cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, necrosis, fibrosis, and local inflammation. Immune and inflammatory responses have significant effects on every phase of atherosclerosis, and increasing evidence shows that immunity plays a more important role in atherosclerosis by tightly regulating its progression. Therefore, understanding the relationship between immune responses and the atherosclerotic microenvironment is extremely important. This article reviews existing knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of immune responses in the atherosclerotic microenvironment, and the immune mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis formation and activation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathomechanisms of Atherosclerosis)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to Top