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Special Issue "Towards Sustainability: Selected Papers from the Fourth World Sustainability Forum (2014)"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Marc A. Rosen

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario, L1H 7K4, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 905 721 3370
Interests: sustainable development; energy; energy; efficiency; environmental impact; economics; ecology; sustainable engineering and design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue comprises selected papers from the Proceedings of the The 4th World Sustainability Forum, an electronic conference that held on the sciforum.net platform in November 2014. Sustainability and sustainable development cover environmental, social and economic dimensions and require a multi-disciplinary approach in order to examine, explore and critically engage with issues and advances in these and related areas. The 4th World Sustainability Forum facilitated debates on theoretical and practical investigations, and allowed participants to “make a difference” through on-line discussions. Besides covering the three pillars of sustainable development, other areas were covered including environmental sustainability, corporate sustainability strategy and economic sustainability, social values for a sustainable economy, energy efficiency and renewable energy sources, sustainable urban development, sustainable development policy, practice and education, sustainable entrepreneurship and sustainability innovation, sustainable agriculture and sustainable management of land and biodiversity. Papers selected for this special issue were subject to a rigorous peer review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments and applications.

Prof. Dr. Marc A. Rosen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • sustainable use of the environment and resources
  • social aspects of sustainability
  • economic, business and management aspects of sustainability
  • sustainable engineering and science
  • energy sustainability
  • sustainable urban and rural development
  • sustainable agriculture, food and wildlife
  • sustainability education and approaches
  • sustainability of culture and heritage

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Displaying articles 1-13
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Research

Open AccessArticle Policy Instruments for Eco-Innovation in Asian Countries
Sustainability 2015, 7(9), 12586-12614; doi:10.3390/su70912586
Received: 5 June 2015 / Revised: 26 August 2015 / Accepted: 9 September 2015 / Published: 11 September 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1116 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Eco-innovation globally emerged as an effort to implement sustainable development. States and firms established and implemented policies and strategies for eco-innovation as one route to achieving sustainable development. Eco-innovation has been facilitated in developed countries, specifically OECD members and European countries, through action
[...] Read more.
Eco-innovation globally emerged as an effort to implement sustainable development. States and firms established and implemented policies and strategies for eco-innovation as one route to achieving sustainable development. Eco-innovation has been facilitated in developed countries, specifically OECD members and European countries, through action plans. Recently, eco-innovation policies have emerged in developing countries. Thus, this study analyzes eco-innovation policies in Asian countries. Policies related to eco-innovation in 17 Asian countries were investigated using policy instrument categories. National policies for eco-innovation were interpreted and compared with development stage classifications. The results indicate that there are similar and different policy approaches to eco-innovation in Asian countries. Given the balance between a technology push (supply side) and a market pull (demand side) in policy instruments for eco-innovation, 17 countries were identified by four categories: leaders, followers, loungers, and laggards. The results provide insight for designing national strategies for eco-innovation in Asia’s developing countries. Therefore, this research contributes to facilitating and diffusing eco-innovation toward sustainability in Asia. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Emergence and Spread of Ecourban Neighbourhoods around the World
Sustainability 2015, 7(9), 11418-11437; doi:10.3390/su70911418
Received: 19 December 2014 / Revised: 28 July 2015 / Accepted: 12 August 2015 / Published: 25 August 2015
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (880 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In modern times, efforts to construct sustainable alternative neighbourhood scale developments date to isolated voluntary initiatives in 1970s Europe and the United States. Since about 2006, they have increased rapidly in popularity. They now go by many names: ecodistricts, écoquartiers, eco-cities, zero/low-carbon/carbon-positive cities,
[...] Read more.
In modern times, efforts to construct sustainable alternative neighbourhood scale developments date to isolated voluntary initiatives in 1970s Europe and the United States. Since about 2006, they have increased rapidly in popularity. They now go by many names: ecodistricts, écoquartiers, eco-cities, zero/low-carbon/carbon-positive cities, ecopolises, ecobarrios, One Planet Communities, and solar cities. They have become frames—sometimes the dominant frame—used to orient the construction of new pieces of a city in a growing number of countries. Despite numerous standardization efforts, the field of ecourban neighbourhood planning and practice lacks a consistent cross-cultural understanding of what constitutes meaningful ecourbanism in specific economic, political, ecological, social, and design-based terms. Ecourban neighbourhood projects also respond to strictly local challenges and opportunities and express themselves in fragmented ways in different contexts. This article presents an original typology of ecourbanism as the integration of seven extreme type principles. We developed this typology through an abductive approach, or the back and forth testing of observed practices with arguments advanced in theories of sustainable development, planning and urban studies. While ecourban neighbourhood developments by definition express integrative goals, this typology permits assessment of the extent to which outcomes are being achieved in terms of each specific principle. We define and present a limiting case for each of these extreme type principles. Rather than attempting to render different standards equivalent across national contexts, this typology-based approach to understand the outcomes of ecourban neighbourhood developments promises a means to facilitate orienting these developments toward higher levels of integration within a common set of principled boundaries, as they are developed around the world. Full article
Open AccessArticle Assessment of Environmental Sustainability in Health Care Organizations
Sustainability 2015, 7(7), 8270-8291; doi:10.3390/su7078270
Received: 29 April 2015 / Revised: 18 June 2015 / Accepted: 19 June 2015 / Published: 29 June 2015
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (367 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Healthcare organizations should set a standard in corporate social responsibility and encourage environmental sustainability, since protection of the environment implies the development of preventive measures in healthcare. Environmental concern has traditionally focused on manufacturing plants. However, a Health Care Organization (HCO) is the
[...] Read more.
Healthcare organizations should set a standard in corporate social responsibility and encourage environmental sustainability, since protection of the environment implies the development of preventive measures in healthcare. Environmental concern has traditionally focused on manufacturing plants. However, a Health Care Organization (HCO) is the only type of company which generates all existing classes of waste, and 20% is dangerous, being infectious, toxic or radioactive in nature. Despite the extensive literature analysing environmental matters, there is no objective model for assessing the environmental sustainability of HCOs in such a way that the results may be compared over time for an organization, and between different organizations, to give a comparison or benchmarking tool for HCOs. This paper presents a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis model integrating a Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process and utility theory, to evaluate environmental sustainability in HCOs. The model uses criteria assessed as a function of the number of annual treatments undertaken. The model has been tested in two HCOs of very different sizes. Full article
Open AccessArticle Evidence and Experience of Open Sustainability Innovation Practices in the Food Sector
Sustainability 2015, 7(7), 8067-8090; doi:10.3390/su7078067
Received: 26 April 2015 / Revised: 13 June 2015 / Accepted: 17 June 2015 / Published: 24 June 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (201 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The adoption of an “open sustainability innovation” approach in business could be a strategic advantage to reach both industry objectives and sustainability goals. The food sector is facing a constant increase in competition. In order to address the high competition that involves the
[...] Read more.
The adoption of an “open sustainability innovation” approach in business could be a strategic advantage to reach both industry objectives and sustainability goals. The food sector is facing a constant increase in competition. In order to address the high competition that involves the food industry, sustainability and innovation practices can be strategically effective, especially with an open sustainability innovation approach. In the literature, we found many examples of open innovation applications and their implications for sustainable strategy. These applications are important for reducing cost and time to market, as well as for a company’s impact on the environment and food security. In this paper, the authors show the evidence of these implications. In particular, starting from the state of the art of the food sector, we highlight the empirical results of ten case studies. By analyzing these cases, we can gain a better awareness on how and why these approaches are currently being applied by food sector companies. Full article
Open AccessArticle Participatory Sustainability Approach to Value Capture-Based Urban Rail Financing in India through Deliberated Stakeholder Engagement
Sustainability 2015, 7(7), 8091-8115; doi:10.3390/su7078091
Received: 9 December 2014 / Revised: 26 May 2015 / Accepted: 27 May 2015 / Published: 24 June 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1597 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Increasingly, cities around the world are seeking innovative financial mechanisms to build rail transit projects. Land value capture (VC) is a financing mechanism to fund urban rail transit. Often VC mechanisms are viewed only as a financing tool applied in relation to increased
[...] Read more.
Increasingly, cities around the world are seeking innovative financial mechanisms to build rail transit projects. Land value capture (VC) is a financing mechanism to fund urban rail transit. Often VC mechanisms are viewed only as a financing tool applied in relation to increased land values from the administration and legislation perspectives, without actively involving the community in the process. The lack of such participation has resulted in the under collection of the true value established. The transit beneficiary community and city tax payers are especially important stakeholders in this process as their willingness to participate is really critical to the overall VC success and transport outcome. This paper introduces a participatory sustainability approach to enable a more deliberated stakeholder engagement intervention across the VC life cycle. A four-step “Participatory Strategic Value Capture (PSVC)” framework is proposed offering step-by-step guidance toward facilitating a meaningful stakeholder dialogue, deliberation, and collaboration around the stated engagement interests. The PSVC framework, applied to the proposed Bangalore sub-urban rail project in India, has demonstrated the importance of stakeholder engagement using deliberated participatory approaches from a win-win perspective. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Notes on the Quality of Life of Artisanal Small-Scale Fishermen along the Pacific Coast of Jalisco, México
Sustainability 2015, 7(5), 6046-6068; doi:10.3390/su7056046
Received: 8 January 2015 / Revised: 29 April 2015 / Accepted: 30 April 2015 / Published: 15 May 2015
PDF Full-text (1975 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sustainable fishing includes the socioeconomic status of fishers. We combined empirical quality of life (QOL) and subjective lived experiences methods to explore the social sustainability of artisanal fishers in five fishery collectives along the coast of Jalisco, Mexico, where the average daily income
[...] Read more.
Sustainable fishing includes the socioeconomic status of fishers. We combined empirical quality of life (QOL) and subjective lived experiences methods to explore the social sustainability of artisanal fishers in five fishery collectives along the coast of Jalisco, Mexico, where the average daily income is slightly above the poverty level. The QOL scores were also related to annual catch and incomes within each collective. A QOL index is used in this study that combines importance and achievement ratings scores; the results are indicative of an acceptable QOL for fishermen. The concept of lived experiences, incorporating aspects of life relating to Mind, Body, Work and People was explored through interviews with 12 fishers. The QOL data revealed that family and friends are important indicators related to positive QOL reported by the sample, while economic indicators were not important. Although four of the five collectives perceived that the future looks worse than the present and past, there was limited correlation between catch or income and QOL. However, while the lived experiences exercise in part supported the QOL findings, in that People was the most important dimension for almost all of the fishers interviewed, negative economic gaps related to poor catches and incomes were prevalent in the Mind and Work dimensions. The findings suggest that to understand the socioeconomic component of sustainable fisheries, both of these approaches should be considered, as they can illuminate different aspects of fishers’ lives that need to be considered during the development of fisheries’ management policies. Full article
Open AccessArticle Evaluating the Thermal Pollution Caused by Wastewaters Discharged from a Chain of Coal-Fired Power Plants along a River
Sustainability 2015, 7(5), 5920-5943; doi:10.3390/su7055920
Received: 28 March 2015 / Revised: 26 April 2015 / Accepted: 8 May 2015 / Published: 13 May 2015
PDF Full-text (1973 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Reliable and safe operation of a coal-fired power plant is strongly linked to freshwater resources, and environmental problems related to water sources and wastewater discharge are challenges for power station operation. In this study, an evaluation on the basis of a wastewater thermal
[...] Read more.
Reliable and safe operation of a coal-fired power plant is strongly linked to freshwater resources, and environmental problems related to water sources and wastewater discharge are challenges for power station operation. In this study, an evaluation on the basis of a wastewater thermal pollution vector is reported for the environmental impact of residual water generated and discharged in the Jiu River during the operation of thermoelectric units of the Rovinari, Turceni and Craiova coal-fired power plants in Romania. Wastewater thermal pollutant vector Plane Projection is applied for assessing the water temperature evolution in the water flow lane created downstream of each power plant wastewater outlet channel. Simulation on the basis of an Electricity of France model, and testing validation of the results for thermoelectric units of 330 MW of these power plants are presented. Full article
Open AccessArticle Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change: Producing Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) and Bush Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) for Improved Food Security and Resilience in a Canadian Subarctic First Nations Community
Sustainability 2015, 7(5), 5664-5681; doi:10.3390/su7055664
Received: 16 January 2015 / Revised: 29 April 2015 / Accepted: 30 April 2015 / Published: 8 May 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1549 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Aboriginal people in Canada experience disproportionately high rates of diet-related illnesses, such as obesity and diabetes. Food insecurity has been identified as a contributing factor to these illnesses along with a loss of traditional lifestyle. Current food systems within northern subarctic and arctic
[...] Read more.
Aboriginal people in Canada experience disproportionately high rates of diet-related illnesses, such as obesity and diabetes. Food insecurity has been identified as a contributing factor to these illnesses along with a loss of traditional lifestyle. Current food systems within northern subarctic and arctic regions of Canada rely heavily on imported foods that are expensive (when available), and are environmentally unsustainable. A warming subarctic and arctic climate present challenges, but also offers the opportunity for local agricultural production that can increase food security and promote a more sustainable food system. In this study the feasibility of sustainably growing potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) utilizing agroforestry practices to enhance food security in remote subarctic communities is explored through a case study in Fort Albany First Nation in northern Ontario, Canada. Potato crops were grown over a two-year period and rotated into plots that had been planted with green bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Results showed that potatoes and bush beans could be grown successfully in the subarctic without the use of greenhouses with yields comparable to more conventional high-input agricultural methods. In subarctic Canada, sustainable local food production can help to promote social capital, healthier lifestyles, and food security. Full article
Open AccessArticle Towards Development of a Label for Zero Emission Buildings: A Tool to Evaluate Potential Zero Emission Buildings
Sustainability 2015, 7(5), 5071-5093; doi:10.3390/su7055071
Received: 14 January 2015 / Revised: 13 April 2015 / Accepted: 15 April 2015 / Published: 27 April 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1983 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The operation of so-called Zero Emission Buildings (ZEB) does not result in harmful emissions to water, soil and air. In contrast, ZEBs produce energy, water and resources. Therefore, the definition of ZEBs in this paper goes well beyond the definition of (Net) Zero
[...] Read more.
The operation of so-called Zero Emission Buildings (ZEB) does not result in harmful emissions to water, soil and air. In contrast, ZEBs produce energy, water and resources. Therefore, the definition of ZEBs in this paper goes well beyond the definition of (Net) Zero Energy Buildings, which focuses primarily on greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels. The concept of ZEB is based on the decentralization of urban infrastructure systems on the building level. The aim is to avoid environmental impacts during the building operation through sustainable production, management, consumption, and recycling of resources. In order to facilitate an easy evaluation of ZEBs a ZEB assessment tool needed to be developed. This paper discusses the development of the general framework, the assessment method, and the ZEB Assessment Tool (ZEBAT), which facilitates the evaluation of the environmental performance of potential ZEBs. The exemplary evaluation of selected case studies from Switzerland and South Korea illustrates the method and the practicability of the ZEBAT for the evaluation of potential ZEBs. The holistic integration of environmental performance factors and their specific environmental impacts facilitates the successful application of the ZEBAT independently from the specific use of a building and its geographical location. Full article
Open AccessArticle LCI Databases Sensitivity Analysis of the Environmental Impact of the Injection Molding Process
Sustainability 2015, 7(4), 3792-3800; doi:10.3390/su7043792
Received: 31 December 2014 / Revised: 20 March 2015 / Accepted: 24 March 2015 / Published: 31 March 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (725 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
During the last decades, society’s concern for the environment has increased. Specific tools like the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), and software and databases to apply this method have been developed to calculate the environmental burden of products or processes. Calculating the environmental impact
[...] Read more.
During the last decades, society’s concern for the environment has increased. Specific tools like the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), and software and databases to apply this method have been developed to calculate the environmental burden of products or processes. Calculating the environmental impact of plastic products is relevant as the global plastics production rose to 288 million tons in 2012. Among the different ways of processing plastics, the injection molding process is one of the most used in the industry worldwide. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis of the environmental impact of the injection molding process has been carried out. In order to perform this study, the EcoInvent database inventory for injection molding, and the data from which this database is created, have been studied. Generally, when an LCA of a product is carried out, databases such as EcoInvent, where materials, processes and transports are characterized providing average values, are used to quantify the environmental impact. This approach can be good enough in some cases but in order to assess a specific production process, like injection molding, a further level of detail is needed. This study shows how the final results of environmental impact differ for injection molding when using the PVC’s, PP’s or PET’s data. This aspect suggests the necessity of studying, in a more precise way, this process, to correctly evaluate its environmental burden. This also allows us to identify priority areas and thereby actions to develop a more sustainable way of manufacturing plastics. Full article
Open AccessArticle Multi-Temporal Patterns of Urban Heat Island as Response to Economic Growth Management
Sustainability 2015, 7(3), 3129-3145; doi:10.3390/su7033129
Received: 16 January 2015 / Revised: 25 February 2015 / Accepted: 26 February 2015 / Published: 16 March 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2238 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
For a reliable assessment of sustainability in big cities, it is imperative to evaluate urban ecosystem conditions and the environment of the cities undergoing economic growth. Urban green spaces are valuable sources of evapotranspiration, which is generated by trees and vegetation; these spaces
[...] Read more.
For a reliable assessment of sustainability in big cities, it is imperative to evaluate urban ecosystem conditions and the environment of the cities undergoing economic growth. Urban green spaces are valuable sources of evapotranspiration, which is generated by trees and vegetation; these spaces mitigate urban heat islands in cities. Land surface temperature (LST) is closely related to the distribution of land-use and land-cover characteristics and can be used as an indicator of urban environment conditions and development. This study evaluates the patterns of LST distribution through time by employing the thermal spatial distribution signature procedure using thermal infrared data obtained from Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper. A set of 18 images, between 1985 and 2010, was used to study the urban environment during summer in 47 neighborhoods of Porto Alegre, Brazil. On a neighborhood scale, results show a non-linear inverse correlation (R² = 0.55) between vegetation index and LST. The overall average of the LST is 300.23 K (27.8 °C) with a standard deviation of 1.25 K and the maximum average difference of 2.83 K between neighborhoods. Results show that the Thermal Spatial Distribution Signature (TSDS) analysis can help multi-temporal studies for the evaluation of UHI through time. Full article
Open AccessArticle Zero Emission Buildings in Korea—History, Status Quo, and Future Prospects
Sustainability 2015, 7(3), 2745-2767; doi:10.3390/su7032745
Received: 2 January 2015 / Revised: 17 February 2015 / Accepted: 28 February 2015 / Published: 6 March 2015
PDF Full-text (4447 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper discusses the history, status quo, and future prospects of Zero Emission Buildings (ZEBs) in the Republic of Korea. The advantages of, and requirements for ZEBs are described, concerning the factors of energy, water, nutrients, and biomass. ZEBs are characterized by net
[...] Read more.
This paper discusses the history, status quo, and future prospects of Zero Emission Buildings (ZEBs) in the Republic of Korea. The advantages of, and requirements for ZEBs are described, concerning the factors of energy, water, nutrients, and biomass. ZEBs are characterized by net zero energy consumption through the minimization of the energy demand, as well as the onsite production and use of renewable energy. The direct water footprint is reduced by up to 100% through on-site water supply and wastewater management according to the principles of Sustainable Sanitation. The fresh water demand is reduced by using water saving technologies and by recycling of wastewater. Rainwater harvesting, utilization, and infiltration facilitates for onsite drinking water production. Nutrients and biomass from sanitation systems are recycled for local soil application. While traditional Korean buildings can be generally regarded as ZEBs, traditional know-how has been overlooked in the process of modernization and implementation of centralized infrastructure systems in the 20th century. However, the growing interest in sustainability issues in Korea since the beginning of the 21st century is reflected in a growing number of research and development activities, including the design, construction, and operation of ZEBs. The widespread implementation of ZEBs would significantly contribute to sustainable development in the Republic of Korea. Full article
Open AccessArticle Addressing the Impact of Environmental Xenobiotics in Coal-Fired Flue Gas
Sustainability 2015, 7(3), 2678-2694; doi:10.3390/su7032678
Received: 20 December 2014 / Revised: 21 February 2015 / Accepted: 27 February 2015 / Published: 5 March 2015
PDF Full-text (1073 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dangerous and unstable situations can result from the presence of environmental xenobiotics since their harmful effects on humans and ecosystems are often unpredictable, and building awareness of the environmental risk should be a main concern of humankind. The environmental xenobiotics in the flue
[...] Read more.
Dangerous and unstable situations can result from the presence of environmental xenobiotics since their harmful effects on humans and ecosystems are often unpredictable, and building awareness of the environmental risk should be a main concern of humankind. The environmental xenobiotics in the flue gas from a fossil fuel-fired electrical generating station, such as particulate matter (PM), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2), are analyzed in this study, since these xenobiotics are persistent pollutants. Mathematical models of the environmental pollutant vector, estimating the emission factors specific to fossil fuel combustion, are applied to the operation of thermal units in the Turceni electrical generating station, each of which produces a net electrical power of 330 MW. For each stack gas component in the pollutant vector, emission factors and pollutant concentrations are determined. A pattern is also examined depicting the mathematically modelled processes of resonant absorption of an environmental xenobiotic harmonic oscillation by an organism modulated as an absorbing oscillator structure. The xenobiotic concentration degree is represented through a spatial concentration vector, which allows further modelling and simulation of the oscillating regime of environmental xenobiotic absorption. Full article

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