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Special Issue "Environment, Tourism and Sustainable Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability of Culture and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kelly S. Bricker

Parks, Recreation and Tourism, Department of Health, Kinesiology and Recreation, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: impacts of tourism in and around protected areas; sustainable tourism management; sense of place; tourism and quality of life

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The journal Sustainability is pleased to announce a Special Issue focused on the environment, tourism, and sustainable development.  As Guest Editor for this issue, we are looking for research related to and not limited to the following:

  • Sustainable consumption and production in tourism
  • Ecological impacts and sustainable solutions
  • Sustainable tourism certification
  • Social and cultural sustainability in tourism
  • Poverty alleviation and tourism development
  • Planetary boundaries and sustainable tourism
  • Sustainable tourism and conservation
  • Resiliency and Tourism
  • Ecotourism
  • Climate and tourism
  • Tourism planning
  • Visitor management
  • Biodiversity conservation
  • Sustainable development goals
  • Sustainable tourism education

In addition, other related areas as appropriate.

Kelly S. Bricker
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ecological impacts
  • Sustainable tourism
  • Resiliency
  • Poverty alleviation
  • Climate change
  • Visitor management
  • Conservation
  • Certification

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Elaborating the Role of Backbone Leadership Organizations in Sustainable Tourism Development: The Monongahela River Valley Coalition
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1367; doi:10.3390/su9081367
Received: 1 June 2017 / Revised: 31 July 2017 / Accepted: 1 August 2017 / Published: 3 August 2017
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Abstract
Leadership has emerged as a central factor in sustainable regional development. Complex regional development initiatives need dynamic leaders to convene diverse stakeholders, sustain participation, leverage external resources, and achieve collective impact. This study researched the deeper meanings and application of backbone leadership using
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Leadership has emerged as a central factor in sustainable regional development. Complex regional development initiatives need dynamic leaders to convene diverse stakeholders, sustain participation, leverage external resources, and achieve collective impact. This study researched the deeper meanings and application of backbone leadership using case study research examining a collaborative, regional initiative known as the Mon River Valley Coalition (MRVC). The MRVC is a regional and community-based economic revitalization program that promotes economic and environmental sustainability by capitalizing on the outdoor recreation and nature-based tourism potential of the Monongahela River. Through an inductive logic process, this research study analyzed the role and capabilities exhibited by backbone leaders associated with the MRVC. The data revealed that backbone leadership has been important to the cumulative success of the Monongahela River Valley Coalition. Study results highlight the backbone leadership roles and capabilities demonstrated by the leadership team both internally and external to the coalition. Sustainable development leaders work in uncharted waters—beyond the safe harbors of government, corporations, and nonprofit organizations. Research is needed that elaborates the integrative work that these sustainability leaders do. Studies such as this one can illuminate the pathway for those to follow. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment, Tourism and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Conservation Policy-Community Conflicts: A Case Study from Bogda Nature Reserve, China
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1291; doi:10.3390/su9081291
Received: 18 June 2017 / Revised: 17 July 2017 / Accepted: 21 July 2017 / Published: 25 July 2017
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Abstract
Bogda Nature Reserve is a World Heritage Site (WHS) in Xinjiang, China. Potential conflicts between community development and heritage conservation are important topics to study and may have an impact on the sustainable development of heritage sites. In this study, we conducted a
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Bogda Nature Reserve is a World Heritage Site (WHS) in Xinjiang, China. Potential conflicts between community development and heritage conservation are important topics to study and may have an impact on the sustainable development of heritage sites. In this study, we conducted a survey with the community residents of the Bogda Nature Reserve to examine major potential conflicts arising from local residents’ perceptions regarding conservation policy and its interventions. The results indicated that the local community supports heritage conservation and development, but they expressed negative attitudes towards their present living conditions, especially due to policy-induced loss of benefits. Through the research, three major conflicts were identified: (1) a divergence in residents’ awareness of the WHS designation and the conservation policy (grazing restriction policy); (2) negative changes in living conditions compared to before the WHS designation; (3) the degradation of well-being caused by tourism. In addition, expectations from residents were combined to assess the implications for the present situation and advise on conservation plans to facilitate sustainable management in Bogda. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment, Tourism and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Perceived Attributes of Event Sustainability in the MICE Industry in Thailand: A Viewpoint from Governmental, Academic, Venue and Practitioner
Sustainability 2017, 9(7), 1151; doi:10.3390/su9071151
Received: 11 April 2017 / Revised: 15 June 2017 / Accepted: 27 June 2017 / Published: 1 July 2017
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Abstract
The environmental impacts of meetings, incentives, conventions, and exhibitions (MICE, Event) industries are as far reaching as their economic reach. The travelers who attend events patronize a wide variety of businesses: airlines, car rental agencies, hotels, restaurants, performance venues, and tour operators. The
[...] Read more.
The environmental impacts of meetings, incentives, conventions, and exhibitions (MICE, Event) industries are as far reaching as their economic reach. The travelers who attend events patronize a wide variety of businesses: airlines, car rental agencies, hotels, restaurants, performance venues, and tour operators. The overall research objectives of this study fall on two aspects of sustainability in the event industry: the most prevalent practices that the industry employs and the relative importance of sustainability to convention consumers. This study implements mixed research methods in order to explore the perceptions of sustainable event development in the metropolitan area of Bangkok, Thailand. Empirical evidence on significant issues for event sustainability is provided. Based on the results, recommendations are made to improve sustainable event development in Thailand and offer guidance to the event industry so that it can develop its potential and gain greater prominence on the world MICE stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment, Tourism and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Tourism Pedagogy and Visitor Responsibilities in Destinations of Local-Global Significance: Climate Change and Social-Political Action
Sustainability 2017, 9(6), 1082; doi:10.3390/su9061082
Received: 30 April 2017 / Revised: 8 June 2017 / Accepted: 14 June 2017 / Published: 21 June 2017
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Abstract
This paper examines the issue of climate change pedagogy and social action in tourism, with particular interest in globally-significant destinations under threat from climate change. Little is understood of the role and responsibility of visitors as key stakeholders in climate change-related action or
[...] Read more.
This paper examines the issue of climate change pedagogy and social action in tourism, with particular interest in globally-significant destinations under threat from climate change. Little is understood of the role and responsibility of visitors as key stakeholders in climate change-related action or the potential of such sites to foster environmental learning, as well as social and political action on climate change. Drawing on insights from Aldo Leopold and John Dewey, it is argued here that destinations that are valued intrinsically for their ecological and cultural importance are (or ought to be) sites of enjoyment and pedagogy, facilitating experiential learning, care, responsibility and civic action towards their conservation. An exploratory case study of visitors to the Great Barrier Reef offers corroborative insights for such a “reef ethic” as described in this paper, related to visitor experience, learning and action in this World Heritage Area. The results of this paper support the need for a stronger pedagogic role to be adopted by tourism experience providers and site managers to facilitate climate change literacy and responsible action (hence facilitating global environmental citizenship). Their responsibility and that of reef visitors is discussed further. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment, Tourism and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Integrating Ecosystem Services and Eco-Security to Assess Sustainable Development in Liuqiu Island
Sustainability 2017, 9(6), 1002; doi:10.3390/su9061002
Received: 20 April 2017 / Revised: 1 June 2017 / Accepted: 2 June 2017 / Published: 9 June 2017
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Abstract
Developing sustainable island tourism must be thoroughly evaluated in consideration of ecological, economic, and social factors on account of the fragility of island ecosystems. This study evaluated the ecological footprint (EF) and ecological capacity of Liuqiu Island from 2010 to 2015 using the
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Developing sustainable island tourism must be thoroughly evaluated in consideration of ecological, economic, and social factors on account of the fragility of island ecosystems. This study evaluated the ecological footprint (EF) and ecological capacity of Liuqiu Island from 2010 to 2015 using the EF model, establishing an indicator to estimate the value of ecosystem service and eco-security. The empirical results include: (1) the overall value of ecosystem service on Liuqiu Island increased from US$3.75 million in 2010 to US$5.11 million in 2015; (2) the total per capita EF considerably increased from 0.5640 gha/person in 2010 to 4.0845 gha/person in 2015; and (3) the ecological footprint index increased from 0.30 in 2010 to 2.28 in 2015. These findings indicate that island tourism recreational zones gradually increased the pressure on its ecosystem, reduced the eco-security level, and severely damaged the environment, thereby threatening the function and structure of the entire ecosystem. The innovations and contributions of this study is integrating ecological footprint and ecosystem services valuation provide insights into sustainability of an island. The theoretical and practical implications identified in this study should contribute to reducing the gap between research and practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment, Tourism and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle The Economic Benefits of the Dokdo Seals Restoration Project in Korea: A Contingent Valuation Study
Sustainability 2017, 9(6), 968; doi:10.3390/su9060968
Received: 7 February 2017 / Revised: 30 May 2017 / Accepted: 31 May 2017 / Published: 6 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (484 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus), especially those that live in Dokdo, Korea, represent an endangered species in Korea. Thus, the government is considering the implementation of the Dokdo Seals (DS) restoration project. This article looks at the economic benefits for implementing
[...] Read more.
Northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus), especially those that live in Dokdo, Korea, represent an endangered species in Korea. Thus, the government is considering the implementation of the Dokdo Seals (DS) restoration project. This article looks at the economic benefits for implementing the project, which includes making habitats for the DS, such as an artificial sea ranch, and training DS rescued from fishing nets and wounded in the wild to adapt to the wild so that they can be released into the Dokdo Sea. To this end, we looked at the willingness to pay (WTP) for the implementation of the project by conducting a contingent valuation (CV) survey of 1000 Korean households. We employed a one-and-one-half-bounded dichotomous choice question format. Furthermore, we used a spike model to model the WTP responses with zero observations. The mean yearly WTP for the project implementation was computed to be KRW 4923 (USD 4.86) for next ten years per household, which is statistically significant at the 1% level. The national annual value amounts to KRW 90.9 billion (USD 89.8 million). This value can be taken as an indication of the economic benefits of restoring the endangered species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment, Tourism and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Rural Second Homes and Their Impacts on Rural Development: A Case Study in East Iran
Sustainability 2017, 9(4), 531; doi:10.3390/su9040531
Received: 18 January 2017 / Revised: 10 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
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Abstract
Previously, rural tourism has developed due to population growth, urbanization, development of transportation, and communication routes. In this context, rural second homes (RSHs) are considered as one of the main instruments of permanent and temporary residency tourism. This study intended to evaluate the
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Previously, rural tourism has developed due to population growth, urbanization, development of transportation, and communication routes. In this context, rural second homes (RSHs) are considered as one of the main instruments of permanent and temporary residency tourism. This study intended to evaluate the impacts that “rural second homes” have on rural development in the Khorashad village in the South Khorasan province of Iran. Data were collected through a questionnaire. Using a random sampling method, 146 permanent rural residents were selected. Results showed that in the view of the respondents, the most important positive and negative impacts of RSHs were, respectively, the physical-environment and socio-cultural aspects of the area. Furthermore, a significant correlation was found between job type, gender, and purchase/construction year of the RSHs and people’s perceptions toward the impacts of RSHs. The study concluded that the most important strategies to reduce negative impacts and increase positive impacts of the RSHs are to, respectively, improve public policies and design geographical distribution patterns in order to develop RSHs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment, Tourism and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Relationships between Tourism and Hospitality Sector Electricity Consumption in Spanish Provinces (1999–2013)
Sustainability 2017, 9(4), 480; doi:10.3390/su9040480
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 13 March 2017 / Accepted: 21 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
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Abstract
The EU is committed to a 40% reduction in their domestic greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. In order to reach this ambitious target, new measures affecting all economic sectors would be needed. This paper focuses on the tourism sector. Using econometric panel data
[...] Read more.
The EU is committed to a 40% reduction in their domestic greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. In order to reach this ambitious target, new measures affecting all economic sectors would be needed. This paper focuses on the tourism sector. Using econometric panel data techniques, the relationships between tourist overnight stays and the hospitality sector electricity consumption is studied for the Spanish provinces during the period 1999–2013. With this aim, an Energy-Tourism Kuznets Curve hypothesis is tested. The results show that the Energy-Tourism Kuznets Curve hypothesis is not supported. An increasing positive relationship between the hospitality sector electricity consumption and overnight stays is observed. Results also show that the hospitality sector electricity consumption elasticity values, with respect to tourist overnight stays, differ among the provinces, the values being within a range of 0.1–0.5 during the period. The highest values are observed for the Balearic Islands, the Canary Islands, Gerona, Tarragona and Malaga. Energy efficiency measures, the adoption of renewable energy systems and the development of energy management capabilities are recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment, Tourism and Sustainable Development)
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