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Special Issue "Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Ian Patterson

Associate Professor, School of Business, Tourism Cluster, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61-7-3346-0753
Interests: Associate Professor Patterson has been a member of the academic staff in the UQ Business School (Tourism) at the University of Queensland since he was appointed Associate Professor in 2001. He was Research Director of the School between 2001 and 2004, and in 2008. Dr Patterson was Co-Editor of the academic journal, Annals of Leisure Research, between 2004 and 2011, and had previously served as an Associate Editor of Schole: A Journal of Leisure and Recreation Education, and of the Journal of Park and Recreation Administration. Dr. Patterson has successfully supervised the completion of 15 Ph.D. scholars. He has published 18 book chapters and over 60 peer-reviewed journal articles in the areas of tourism, leisure, sports, and health. In 2006, he completed a textbook for CABI International entitled “Growing older: tourism and leisure behaviour of older adults.”

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The tourism and hospitality industry is one of the largest industries in the world. International tourism has grown by 5% in 2013 to 1.087 billion. This is expected to reach 1.5 billion by 2020 (United Nations World Tourism Organization, 2014). However, as more regions and countries develop their tourism industries, these areas will experience significant impacts on their natural resources, consumption patterns, pollution levels, and social systems.

As a result, “sustainable tourism” has become the new buzz word for tourism operators, so as to incorporate a suitable balance between the three dimensions of tourism development: the environmental, the economic, and the socio-cultural. This balancing act aims to guarantee the long-term sustainability of tourism. Sustainability is about more than just looking after the natural environment; it is about considering the social and economic impact of what we do and how we do it. Thus, the pillars of sustainable tourism are environmental integrity, social justice, and economic development.

This Special Issue will comprise of a selection of papers that will address the three pillars of sustainable tourism and are based on the following themes:

The optimal use of environmental resources, the maintenance of essential ecological processes, and the need to conserve natural heritage and biodiversity, which are key elements in sustainable tourism development.
The need to respect the socio-cultural authenticity of host communities, so as to conserve their built and living cultural heritage and traditional values, and to contribute to inter-cultural understanding and tolerance.
To ensure viable, long-term economic operations, so as to provide socio-economic benefits to all stakeholders that are fairly distributed, including stable employment and income-earning opportunities and social services to host communities, which are helping to alleviate poverty.

Papers selected for this Special Issue will undertake a rigorous peer review process.

Dr. Ian Patterson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable tourism
  • environmental resources
  • socio-cultural
  • economic development, stakeholders
  • natural heritage
  • biodiversity

Published Papers (17 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Factors Influencing Perceived Crowding of Tourists and Sustainable Tourism Destination Management
Sustainability 2016, 8(10), 976; doi:10.3390/su8100976
Received: 7 June 2016 / Revised: 29 August 2016 / Accepted: 29 August 2016 / Published: 27 September 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (255 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Studies on tourists crowding are developed to explore the perception of crowding, and these studies indicate crowding influence on sustainable development of tourist destinations. This study aims to reveal the influential factors of tourists’ perceived crowding. We obtained data from interviewing over 400
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Studies on tourists crowding are developed to explore the perception of crowding, and these studies indicate crowding influence on sustainable development of tourist destinations. This study aims to reveal the influential factors of tourists’ perceived crowding. We obtained data from interviewing over 400 tourists and five senior tourism officials in Xi’an, China. This study firstly applies factor analysis to identify the constructed variables of tourists’ motivations from the principle component analysis. It then examines the correlation between nationality and perceived crowding. Consequently, a multiple regression is used to identify the connection between motivations and perceived crowding. The results of the study indicate nationality and motivation as two significant influential factors to perceived crowding management. This study also shows that management in tourist destinations would benefit from provision of the authentic travel experience integrated with zoning the travel destination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessArticle Food Tourism in Indigenous Settings as a Strategy of Sustainable Development: The Case of Ilex guayusa Loes. in the Ecuadorian Amazon
Sustainability 2016, 8(10), 967; doi:10.3390/su8100967
Received: 13 June 2016 / Revised: 14 September 2016 / Accepted: 19 September 2016 / Published: 22 September 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (576 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper seeks to contribute to the discussion on how to enhance food tourism in emerging, tropical countries characterized by a large number of indigenous groups and a high biodiversity. A sacred plant for the Kichwa indigenous communities labelled Ilex guayusa Loes. (Aquifoliceae)
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This paper seeks to contribute to the discussion on how to enhance food tourism in emerging, tropical countries characterized by a large number of indigenous groups and a high biodiversity. A sacred plant for the Kichwa indigenous communities labelled Ilex guayusa Loes. (Aquifoliceae) is used as a case study. Twelve recorded interviews with different stakeholders of the Amazon region of Napo in Ecuador were analysed. The results of this qualitative research show that the Western-based theory on niche tourism based on experiential and intimacy theory is compatible with four principles which are related to the cosmovision (worldview) of Kichwa indigenous groups, namely: mutual learning, empowerment, regulated access to intellectual property and community legislation. The framework proposed seems suitable to understand food tourism in an indigenous setting. Furthermore, the integration of Western-based food tourism with an indigenous cosmovision might contribute to a more sustainable land use and more equitable social development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
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Open AccessArticle Public Willingness to Pay for Transforming Jogyesa Buddhist Temple in Seoul, Korea into a Cultural Tourism Resource
Sustainability 2016, 8(9), 900; doi:10.3390/su8090900
Received: 23 May 2016 / Revised: 5 August 2016 / Accepted: 30 August 2016 / Published: 6 September 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (255 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Jogyesa Buddhist Temple (JBT), located in Seoul, Korea, is the chief temple of the Jogye Order, which represents Korean Buddhism. The Seoul government plans to transform the JBT into a cultural tourism resource and a historical site. This study attempts to analyze
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The Jogyesa Buddhist Temple (JBT), located in Seoul, Korea, is the chief temple of the Jogye Order, which represents Korean Buddhism. The Seoul government plans to transform the JBT into a cultural tourism resource and a historical site. This study attempts to analyze the willingness to pay (WTP) for implementing the transformation, which includes building a new shopping arcade for Buddhist culture and tourism, constructing a museum for the teaching of history and an experience center for Korean traditional culture in the precincts of JBT, and making an open space for domestic and/or foreign visitors. To this end, the study looks into the WTP for the implementation, reporting on a contingent valuation (CV) survey that was conducted with 500 Seoul households. The single-bounded dichotomous choice CV model and a spike model were applied to derive the WTP responses and analyze the WTP data with zero observations, respectively. The mean yearly WTP was computed to be KRW 7129 (USD 6.30) per household for the next five years, with the estimate being statistically significant at the 1% level. Expanding the value to the Seoul population gives us KRW 25.4 billion (USD 22.5 million) per year. The present value of the total WTP amounts to KRW 114.6 billion (USD 101.3 million) using a social discount rate of 5.5%. We can conclude that Seoul households are ready to shoulder some of the financial burden of implementing the transformation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessArticle Sustainability and the Tourism and Hospitality Workforce: A Thematic Analysis
Sustainability 2016, 8(8), 809; doi:10.3390/su8080809
Received: 14 June 2016 / Revised: 5 August 2016 / Accepted: 11 August 2016 / Published: 17 August 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (921 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This paper is about the position of workforce and employment considerations within the sustainable tourism narrative. The paper aims to address the relative neglect of this area within the discourse of sustainable tourism and highlights references to the workforce within the United Nations’
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This paper is about the position of workforce and employment considerations within the sustainable tourism narrative. The paper aims to address the relative neglect of this area within the discourse of sustainable tourism and highlights references to the workforce within the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The discussion follows the emerging field of sustainable human resource management and the contribution that this can make to meeting both the UN Sustainable Development Goals and to enhancing the recognition of workforce and employment issues within the related debate in tourism. The body of the paper highlights examples of key dimensions of work and employment across varied tourism contexts, where sustainability is of increasing consequence and significance. The paper concludes by drawing together the implications of these “mini-cases” and locating them within key principles of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
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Open AccessArticle Sustainability Commitment, New Competitors’ Presence, and Hotel Performance: The Hotel Industry in Barcelona
Sustainability 2016, 8(8), 755; doi:10.3390/su8080755
Received: 9 May 2016 / Revised: 26 July 2016 / Accepted: 26 July 2016 / Published: 4 August 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (351 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The hospitality industry is facing major challenges, among them the new competition from novel forms of supply in the sharing economy. Airbnb, Homeaway, and Niumba, among other websites offering accommodations, are having an important impact in the sector, changing existing conditions and the
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The hospitality industry is facing major challenges, among them the new competition from novel forms of supply in the sharing economy. Airbnb, Homeaway, and Niumba, among other websites offering accommodations, are having an important impact in the sector, changing existing conditions and the market for the traditional hospitality industry. In this context, a strategy based in differentiation can help to prevent drops in revenues and profitability. The main objective of this paper is analyse if commitment towards sustainability has a positive impact on financial performance and can be considered a positive strategy in this new environment. The empirical data refer to a sample of hotels in Barcelona, one of the most important tourist cities in Europe. Our results suggest that there is no clear relationship between sustainability and better financial performance; however, sustainability commitment is associated with a minimum size, which can also have positive effects in terms of economies of scale and finally affect profitability. Hotels more committed to environmental issues are located in areas with a lower density of Airbnb apartments, and this geographical distribution can be more positive than a situation of massive tourist concentration in specific areas with negative externalities for neighbours. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
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Open AccessArticle Expert Concepts of Sustainable Service Innovation in Restaurants in Taiwan
Sustainability 2016, 8(8), 739; doi:10.3390/su8080739
Received: 4 May 2016 / Revised: 1 July 2016 / Accepted: 7 July 2016 / Published: 3 August 2016
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Abstract
Sustainable service innovation is a critical attribute in restaurant management that is widely recognized by experts and restaurant owners. In this paper, we investigated ideas on sustainable service innovation in restaurants gathered from interviews with restaurant managers, government experts and scholars in Taiwan.
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Sustainable service innovation is a critical attribute in restaurant management that is widely recognized by experts and restaurant owners. In this paper, we investigated ideas on sustainable service innovation in restaurants gathered from interviews with restaurant managers, government experts and scholars in Taiwan. The analytical results show that five dimensions are major indicators of sustainable service innovation in the restaurant management field. These include the following dimensions: sustainable service innovation, food service technology, organizational learning, adoption of innovation and organizational environment. We also found that these five dimensions are important and that they deeply impact restaurant performance. We discuss the characteristics of these five attributes, and talk about the theoretical and empirical implications of research findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
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Open AccessArticle Sustainable Cultural Tourism in Urban Destinations: Does Space Matter?
Sustainability 2016, 8(8), 699; doi:10.3390/su8080699
Received: 14 May 2016 / Revised: 15 July 2016 / Accepted: 18 July 2016 / Published: 25 July 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2532 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Policy makers and tourism developers must understand visitors’ mobility behavior and how they consume space and tourism resources in order to set up sustainable cultural tourism destinations. With this in mind, it should also be pointed out that the mobility patterns of tourists
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Policy makers and tourism developers must understand visitors’ mobility behavior and how they consume space and tourism resources in order to set up sustainable cultural tourism destinations. With this in mind, it should also be pointed out that the mobility patterns of tourists in urban destinations are mainly located in the city center (spatial centrality), the analysis of which enables us to define “how central” the resources (museums, monuments, etc.) are and what the interactions between them are. Comprehending which factors influence visitors’ urban mobility behavior is key to understanding tourists’ consumption of space and their connections with the tourism assets of the city. Furthermore, when tourists visit a destination, they make a mental representation of the destination, constructing a mental map of it. Thus, tourists consume not only spaces but also the image of a city/destination. Moreover, the latter influences the former. The quality of surrounding architecture and urbanism plays a crucial role in enhancing the experiential value of a destination and influencing space consumption preferences. Clearly, visitors are more likely to use/consume environments that are easily navigated and mentally legible. In order to explore these patterns, a real experiment was performed based on visitor behavior in the city of Bilbao. In addition, the central places of Bilbao were determined and an analysis of the spatial interaction between cultural sites was performed, making use of a new methodology based on GPS technologies, network analysis, and surveys. This methodology is the main contribution of this work. The results suggest that (1) easy mobility (walkability, accessibility, different transport modes) of the visited space facilitates the tourist experience; (2) simple and eligible mental maps of the city that are easily perceived by visitors facilitate the rapid consumption of the tourist destination; and (3) the centrality of the tourism resources affects the mobility of visitors and the consumption of the destination. Thus, by understanding how tourist mobility works in a destination and analyzing tourism resources’ centrality, policy makers may better tailor sustainable strategies for cultural tourism destinations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
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Open AccessArticle The Adoption of Environmental Practices in Small Hotels. Voluntary or Mandatory? An Empirical Approach
Sustainability 2016, 8(7), 695; doi:10.3390/su8070695
Received: 5 May 2016 / Revised: 11 July 2016 / Accepted: 18 July 2016 / Published: 21 July 2016
PDF Full-text (507 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper examines small hotels that have some type of environmental certification. A survey of 210 small (less than 50 employees) Catalonian hotels was conducted to investigate whether there are significant differences in the results of the implementation practices between hotels that adopt
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This paper examines small hotels that have some type of environmental certification. A survey of 210 small (less than 50 employees) Catalonian hotels was conducted to investigate whether there are significant differences in the results of the implementation practices between hotels that adopt these certifications due to environmental pressure (from the government, customers, suppliers and other stakeholders) and hotels that voluntarily commit to green policies. Significant differences were identified in the results on the hotels when structural equation modelling (SEM) was undertaken. This investigation suggests that hotels that voluntarily commit to green policies obtain better results than other hotels. The conclusion is that governments must not only regulate, but also promote awareness actions in small and medium-sized (SME) tourism companies to improve the environment. SME tourism companies must understand that both the environment and they themselves will benefit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessArticle Transforming Mature Tourism Resorts into Sustainable Tourism Destinations through Participatory Integrated Approaches: The Case of Puerto de la Cruz
Sustainability 2016, 8(7), 680; doi:10.3390/su8070680
Received: 14 March 2016 / Revised: 1 July 2016 / Accepted: 13 July 2016 / Published: 20 July 2016
PDF Full-text (3096 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Transforming mature tourism resorts has evolved toward a greater involvement of public authorities and away from the mere renovation of public spaces. Authorities today are required to lead the reorganization of tourism activities through the development of co-operative networks between all stakeholders involved.
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Transforming mature tourism resorts has evolved toward a greater involvement of public authorities and away from the mere renovation of public spaces. Authorities today are required to lead the reorganization of tourism activities through the development of co-operative networks between all stakeholders involved. In this paper, a participatory integrated approach has been designed and implemented in collaboration with Spanish authorities and the tourism sector to propose a strategy to achieve the renovation of tourism resorts. This methodology was applied to Puerto de la Cruz, the oldest tourism destination in the Canary Islands and a clear paradigm of a consolidated resort. The objective is to define and implement policies to transform Puerto de la Cruz into a more sustainable tourism destination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Determining Sustainable Tourism in Regions
Sustainability 2016, 8(7), 660; doi:10.3390/su8070660
Received: 8 June 2016 / Revised: 5 July 2016 / Accepted: 6 July 2016 / Published: 12 July 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1814 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The goal of achieving sustainable tourism is now a priority for many tourism planners. It has been suggested that stakeholder analysis is an essential step in determining sustainable tourism in regions, given its highly contextual nature. However, previous research has tended to focus
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The goal of achieving sustainable tourism is now a priority for many tourism planners. It has been suggested that stakeholder analysis is an essential step in determining sustainable tourism in regions, given its highly contextual nature. However, previous research has tended to focus heavily on stakeholders with the assumption that attitudes within groups are homogeneous. This research questions this assumption and in doing so, takes a critical approach by examining attitudes towards sustainable tourism and then assesses whether attitudes align with stakeholder groups. The study was conducted in the island state of Tasmania, Australia, and utilised the Q-methodology to examine attitudes towards sustainable tourism in the Bay of Fires region. The results concur with recent research, which shows that attitudes do not always align with those of stakeholder groups. The critical and reflexive approach suggests that assumptions regarding stakeholder attitudes need to be reviewed and more attention given to people’s contextualised attitudes, rather than the stakeholder group in which they sit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessArticle Tourists’ Environmentally Responsible Behavior in Response to Climate Change and Tourist Experiences in Nature-Based Tourism
Sustainability 2016, 8(7), 644; doi:10.3390/su8070644
Received: 30 May 2016 / Revised: 30 June 2016 / Accepted: 4 July 2016 / Published: 8 July 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (234 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nature-based tourism destinations—locations in which economic viability and environmental responsibility are sought—are sensitive to climate change and its effects on important environmental components of the tourism areas. To meet the dual roles, it is important for destination marketers and resources managers to provide
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Nature-based tourism destinations—locations in which economic viability and environmental responsibility are sought—are sensitive to climate change and its effects on important environmental components of the tourism areas. To meet the dual roles, it is important for destination marketers and resources managers to provide quality experiences for tourists and to induce tourists’ environmentally responsible behavior in such destinations. This study documents the importance of perceptions toward climate change and tourist experiences in determining tourists’ environmentally responsible behavior while enjoying holidays at nature-based tourism destinations in Jeju Island, South Korea. Two hundred and eleven Korean and 204 Chinese tourists marked dominant tourist arrivals to the island, and responded to the survey questionnaire. Results showed that perceptions toward climate change and tourist experiences affect Korean tourists’ environmentally responsible behavior intentions, whereas tourist experiences—not perceptions toward climate change—only significantly affect Chinese tourists’ behavior intention. In a nature-based tourism context under the pressure of climate change and adverse environmental effects as consequences of tourism activities, resources managers and destination marketers need to develop environmental campaigns or informative tourist programs to formulate environmentally responsible behavior as well as to increase tourist quality experiences among domestic and international tourists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessArticle Accommodation Consumers and Providers’ Attitudes, Behaviours and Practices for Sustainability: A Systematic Review
Sustainability 2016, 8(7), 625; doi:10.3390/su8070625
Received: 1 June 2016 / Revised: 28 June 2016 / Accepted: 29 June 2016 / Published: 2 July 2016
PDF Full-text (282 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Accommodation and lodging are an integral component of the tourism and hospitality industry. Given the sectors’ growing contribution to resource consumption and waste, there is a growing body of literature on the attitudes, behaviours and practices of consumers, managers, staff and owners of
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Accommodation and lodging are an integral component of the tourism and hospitality industry. Given the sectors’ growing contribution to resource consumption and waste, there is a growing body of literature on the attitudes, behaviours and practices of consumers, managers, staff and owners of lodging with respect to sustainability. This paper presents the results of a systematic analysis of articles on attitudes, behaviours and practices of consumers and the provision of accommodation with respect to sustainability. The results indicate that there is a dearth of longitudinal studies on the sustainability of practices and behaviours. There are limitations in geographical coverage as well as methods, with research dominated by convenience sampling approaches. It is concluded that while there appear to be improvements in the potential sustainability of lodging with respect to technological approaches, the lack of systematic long-term studies on behavioural interventions represents a significant challenge to reducing the absolute emissions of the sector as well as reductions in energy and water use and waste production. Given the lack of longitudinal studies, it is not known whether observed behavioural changes are sustained over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessArticle Is Tourism Development a Sustainable Economic Growth Strategy in the Long Run? Evidence from GCC Countries
Sustainability 2016, 8(7), 605; doi:10.3390/su8070605
Received: 8 April 2016 / Revised: 9 June 2016 / Accepted: 20 June 2016 / Published: 28 June 2016
PDF Full-text (219 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The main objective of this study is to investigate the causal relationship between tourism development and economic growth in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries in a multivariate model, using panel data for the period 1995–2012. The study adopts a panel Granger causality analysis
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The main objective of this study is to investigate the causal relationship between tourism development and economic growth in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries in a multivariate model, using panel data for the period 1995–2012. The study adopts a panel Granger causality analysis approach to assess the contribution of tourism to economic growth in GCC countries as a whole, and in each individual country. In the case of GCC countries as a whole, the results show a one-way Granger causality, from economic growth to tourism growth. Furthermore, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates follow the path of economy-driven tourism growth, as hypothesized. The reverse hypothesis (i.e., tourism-led growth hypothesis) holds true for Bahrain, while there is no causal relationship between tourism and economic growth in the case of Oman. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessArticle An Integrated Approach to “Sustainable Community-Based Tourism”
Sustainability 2016, 8(5), 475; doi:10.3390/su8050475
Received: 21 February 2016 / Revised: 17 April 2016 / Accepted: 4 May 2016 / Published: 13 May 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (601 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Two rich knowledge domains have been evolving along parallel pathways in tourism studies: sustainable tourism (ST) and community-based tourism (CBT). Within both lie diverse definitions, principles, criteria, critical success factors and benefits sought or outcomes desired, advocated by different stakeholders ranging from quasi-governmental
[...] Read more.
Two rich knowledge domains have been evolving along parallel pathways in tourism studies: sustainable tourism (ST) and community-based tourism (CBT). Within both lie diverse definitions, principles, criteria, critical success factors and benefits sought or outcomes desired, advocated by different stakeholders ranging from quasi-governmental and non-profit organizations to public-private sector and academic interests. This poses significant challenges to those interested in theory building, research and practice in the sustainable development and management of tourism. The paper builds on a previous article published in Sustainability by presenting an integrated framework based on a comprehensive, in-depth review and analysis of the tourism-related literature. The study reveals not just common ground and differences that might be anticipated, but also important sustainability dimensions that are lagging or require much greater attention, such as equity, justice, ethical and governance issues. A preliminary framework of “sustainable community-based tourism” (SCBT) is forwarded that attempts to bridge the disparate literature on ST and CBT. Critical directions forward are offered to progress research and sustainability-oriented practices towards more effective development and management of tourism in the 21st century. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessArticle Analysis of the Relationship between Tourism and Food Culture
Sustainability 2016, 8(5), 418; doi:10.3390/su8050418
Received: 7 February 2016 / Revised: 23 April 2016 / Accepted: 25 April 2016 / Published: 27 April 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (206 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In recent years, gastronomy has established itself as one of the key elements for the enhancement, sustainable and consolidation of tourist destinations. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the advancement of knowledge on gastronomic tourism in European countries, specifically in
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In recent years, gastronomy has established itself as one of the key elements for the enhancement, sustainable and consolidation of tourist destinations. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the advancement of knowledge on gastronomic tourism in European countries, specifically in the analysis of the relationship between gastronomy, culture and tourism as the research focuses on the city of Córdoba, Spain. The methodology of this research involved conducting surveys with foreign travelers who were lunching or dining at various restaurants in the historic area, and these facilities were characterized by having in their gastronomic menus major typical culinary products of the city using the concept of tapas, i.e., the presentation of gastronomy through small portions of food. The results of the study indicate that the healthy component of the gastronomy represents the main dimension. Based on the detected dimensions, three types of international visitors are established (healthy-cultural tourist, cultural tourist and generic tourist) which are considered valid and useful for segmenting the market. This highlights the importance given to gastronomy by tourists as part of the cultural identity of a place and the satisfaction achieved through the gastronomy of the city of Córdoba. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessArticle The Role of Sustainable Service Innovation in Crafting the Vision of the Hospitality Industry
Sustainability 2016, 8(3), 223; doi:10.3390/su8030223
Received: 4 January 2016 / Revised: 24 February 2016 / Accepted: 25 February 2016 / Published: 1 March 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (495 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the key characteristics of sustainable service innovation in the hospitality industry. We conducted a content analysis based on the interview records for 17 experts (including three academic scholars, three government officers and 11 top-level managers)
[...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to examine the key characteristics of sustainable service innovation in the hospitality industry. We conducted a content analysis based on the interview records for 17 experts (including three academic scholars, three government officers and 11 top-level managers) with an average of 20 years of experience in the hospitality management domain in Taiwan. The analytical results conform to Amabile’s (1988) componential theory of creativity and innovation and show that 11 characteristics are major indicators of sustainable service innovation in the hotel management field. These include the following characteristics: market position, customer satisfaction, service orientation, environmental thinking, employee involvement, incentive mechanism, human resource development, environmental services, cultural resource management, government policy and school education. Accordingly, using the integrated theory of sustainable service innovation and professional opinions from experts, we provide theoretical and practical implications for current and future trends on sustainability and innovation in the hospitality industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)
Open AccessArticle Economic Valuation of Mining Heritage from a Recreational Approach: Application to the Case of El Soplao Cave in Spain (Geosite UR004)
Sustainability 2016, 8(2), 185; doi:10.3390/su8020185
Received: 4 January 2016 / Revised: 4 February 2016 / Accepted: 16 February 2016 / Published: 20 February 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (5518 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Heritage tourism can increase incomes and stimulate the economy in former mining areas. Recreational tourism is one of the main sources of value of heritage. People from urban areas are willing to pay for access to these tourism options. The measurement of the
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Heritage tourism can increase incomes and stimulate the economy in former mining areas. Recreational tourism is one of the main sources of value of heritage. People from urban areas are willing to pay for access to these tourism options. The measurement of the economic impact of this availability is one of the main problems to confront, due to the immeasurable possibilities of heritage resources. The use of non-market values and their estimation by means of revealed preference methods should help to assess the economic value of this sort of resources from a recreational perspective. The travel cost method (TCM) is widely used to value areas with recreational uses, such as lakes, beaches or forests, but there are not references to previous applications of this methodology in the field of mining heritage. In this work, TCM has been applied to obtain the economic value of El Soplao Cave (Geosite UR004, Cantabria, Spain) as a recreational site, providing an estimated result of 34,961,162 euros. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management in Tourism and Hospitality)

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