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Special Issue "Sustainable River Basin Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Phoebe Koundouri

1. ATHENS UNIVERSITY OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS, Department of International and European Economic Studies and Director of ReSEES: Research on Socio-Economic and Environmental Sustainability, Greece
2. LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE (LSE), Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, UK
3. ICRE8 (The International Centre for Research on the Environment and the Economy), Athens, Greece
4. ATHENA (ATHENA Research and Innovation Center in ICT and Knowledge Technologies), Athens, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +30 210 8214122
Interests: Natural Resources (Renewable and Non-Renewable) Economics and Econometrics; Long-Run Discounting, Economic Sustainability and Long-Run Cost-Benefit Analysis; Uncertainty, Risk and Irreversibility, Natural Disasters; Benefit Valuation; Production and the Environment; Agricultural Economics; Regulation and Instruments; Game Theory and the Environment; Philosophy of science applied to economics (general), econometrics and environmental and resource economics; Econometric Methods
Guest Editor
Dr. Ebun Akinsete

ICRE8 (The International Centre for Research on the Environment and the Economy), Athens, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +302106875346
Interests: sustainable development, urban regeneration, Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) policy and implementation, community development, climate change mitigation, renewable energy, stakeholder participation, participatory planning, evaluation and impact assessment for sustainability, sustainability in developing nations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue seeks to expand the discourse on methodological and empirical advancements within the field of sustainable river basin management. Curated papers examine integrated approaches to river basin management, taking into account various multidisciplinary perspectives on the subject. Ecosystems services and the extent to which they are considered and embedded in current river basin management practice is a core focal point of this Special Issue. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of ‘sustainability’ and the exploration of a systems approach, which considers river basin management holistically in the context of environmental, economic and social sustainability. Therefore, aspects such as the integration of the Sustainable Development Goals and their implementation within relevant policy are also deliberated within the selected papers.

Prof. Dr. Phoebe Koundouri
Dr. Ebun Akinsete
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Water
  • Environmental Sustainability
  • Economic Sustainability
  • Social Sustainability
  • River Basin Management
  • Policy and Governance
  • Ecosystem Services
  • Multidisciplinary Approach
  • Integrated Management
  • Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
  • SDG Implementation

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Spatial and Temporal Variations of Water Quality in Songhua River from 2006 to 2015: Implication for Regional Ecological Health and Food Safety
Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1502; doi:10.3390/su9091502
Received: 6 July 2017 / Revised: 3 August 2017 / Accepted: 21 August 2017 / Published: 24 August 2017
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Abstract
The Songhua River is the largest river in northeastern China; the river’s water quality is one of the most important factors that influence regional ecological health and food safety in northeastern China and even the downstream of the Heilong River in Russia. In
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The Songhua River is the largest river in northeastern China; the river’s water quality is one of the most important factors that influence regional ecological health and food safety in northeastern China and even the downstream of the Heilong River in Russia. In recent years, the Chinese government implemented several water resource protection policies to improve the river’s water quality. In order to evaluate the influence of the new policies on the water quality in the Songhua River, water quality data from 2006 to 2015 were collected monthly from the nine sites along the mainstream of the Songhua River. Results show that the water quality in the Songhua River could be divided into two groups during the last 10 years. Before 2010, water quality in the Songhua River was primarily influenced by regional human activities. Industries were the major pollutant sources in the upstream of the Songhua River. After several new policies were implemented by the local government in 2010, water quality in the Songhua River improved. As a result, the biodiversity of fish and ecological health in the Songhua River improved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable River Basin Management)
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Open AccessArticle Zoning and Analysis of Control Units for Water Pollution Control in the Yangtze River Basin, China
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1374; doi:10.3390/su9081374
Received: 21 June 2017 / Revised: 24 July 2017 / Accepted: 1 August 2017 / Published: 4 August 2017
PDF Full-text (4484 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In order to meet the needs of the control-unit-based water pollution prevention problem in China, we proposed a comprehensive control unit zoning method with the combined basic administrative region and objective watershed management. The method can effectively connect the natural characteristics of watershed
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In order to meet the needs of the control-unit-based water pollution prevention problem in China, we proposed a comprehensive control unit zoning method with the combined basic administrative region and objective watershed management. The method can effectively connect the natural characteristics of watershed water sources, three-level zoning of water resources, and comprehensively consider the pollution distribution, socio-economics and many other factors. The zoning process includes four steps: (1) Generate the multi-level hydrological unit; (2) Identify the multi-element water catchment units; (3) Obtain the control unit with the administrative boundary as the boundary; (4) Check and adjust the results to meet the actual needs. Based on this method, the Yangtze River Basin was divided into 568 control units with a total area of 1.91 million km2. These control units were used as the basic unit to analyze the water quality status and the results show that the upper reaches have good water quality, while the lower reaches have poor water quality and more serious water pollution. Our study helps the Ministry of Environmental Protection of China develop the list of control units that are needed to improve water quality during the “13th Five-Year Plan”, with a goal to provide technical support for control-unit-based water pollution prevention and control in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable River Basin Management)
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Open AccessArticle Economic Valuation of the Aquatic Biodiversity Conservation in South Korea: Correcting for the Endogeneity Bias in Contingent Valuation
Sustainability 2017, 9(6), 930; doi:10.3390/su9060930
Received: 24 February 2017 / Revised: 23 May 2017 / Accepted: 30 May 2017 / Published: 2 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (606 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, we use the Contingent Valuation (CV) method to estimate households’ willingness to pay (WTP) for the aquatic ecosystem health (biodiversity) improvement. This paper extends CV studies by dealing with the endogenous effect of a proxy variable, namely the subjective experience
[...] Read more.
In this study, we use the Contingent Valuation (CV) method to estimate households’ willingness to pay (WTP) for the aquatic ecosystem health (biodiversity) improvement. This paper extends CV studies by dealing with the endogenous effect of a proxy variable, namely the subjective experience of negative environmental quality changes. The results show that the correction for the endogeneity bias facilitates the efficiency of parameter estimation in the empirical model. The mean WTP per household accounts for around 46.8% (KRW 79.6) of the current water use charge (KRW 170 per cubic meter). The total benefit from conserving the biodiversity is around KRW 198.62 billion. We found several factors that affect households’ WTP for fish biodiversity conservation, suggesting the importance of these factors in the formulation of water policies associated with aquatic biodiversity. In addition, the inefficient water management costs should be redistributed to other projects or new programs such as for the fish biodiversity conservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable River Basin Management)
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Open AccessArticle Sustainable Use of Reservoir Sediment through Partial Application in Building Material
Sustainability 2017, 9(5), 852; doi:10.3390/su9050852
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 10 May 2017 / Accepted: 15 May 2017 / Published: 21 May 2017
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Abstract
Sediment, often considered a by-product of various activities within river basin management to be disposed of, or a pollutant to be controlled, is increasingly being acknowledged as a resource in need of management. The paper deals with the possibility of reusing sediment from
[...] Read more.
Sediment, often considered a by-product of various activities within river basin management to be disposed of, or a pollutant to be controlled, is increasingly being acknowledged as a resource in need of management. The paper deals with the possibility of reusing sediment from two Slovak reservoirs (Klusov and Ruzin) as an alternative raw material in concrete production. Concrete specimens were prepared by a combination of original reservoir sediment, reservoir sediment mechanically activated by dry milling, reservoir sediment mechanically activated by dry milling together with biomass incinerator fly-ash as a binder. To improve the strength properties of specimens, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) was used as a sediment activator. Mixtures containing 40% of binder replacement by the above-mentioned combinations of original and treated sediments were tested for flexural and compressive strengths after 28, 90 and 365 days of curing. The results showed that the mixtures prepared from sediments milled without and with addition of fly ash as cement replacement satisfied the strength requirements for the compressive strength class C16/20 according to the European standard except the composites prepared with NaOH as the sediment activator. Addition of NaOH into composites in the concentration of 5 M as an activator of sediment indicated the negative impact on compressive and flexural strengths and thus NaOH was not an effective pozzolanic activator for sediments. This study reveals that the sediment may be considered as 40% cement substitution in building materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable River Basin Management)
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Open AccessArticle Floodplain Stability Indices for Sustainable Waterfront Development by Spatial Identification of Erosion and Deposition
Sustainability 2017, 9(5), 735; doi:10.3390/su9050735
Received: 7 March 2017 / Revised: 19 April 2017 / Accepted: 25 April 2017 / Published: 3 May 2017
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Abstract
The abrupt rises of water level in rivers by torrential rain or storm repeatedly cause inundation damage, such as erosion and deposition in floodplains. However, studies on identifying the abrasion of waterfront facilities or the accumulation of sediment near rivers under extreme flow
[...] Read more.
The abrupt rises of water level in rivers by torrential rain or storm repeatedly cause inundation damage, such as erosion and deposition in floodplains. However, studies on identifying the abrasion of waterfront facilities or the accumulation of sediment near rivers under extreme flow conditions are seldom found because floodplains are utilized in various ways in each country. In this study, novel floodplain sustainability indices by spatial classification of erosion and deposition were developed for sustainable waterfront development. The indices can provide the relative spatial distribution of erosion and deposition in a floodplain by using only kinematic flow information, such as flow depth and velocity obtained by 2D numerical analysis. Accordingly, applying a complex sediment transport model that involves numerous assumptions and parameters can be moderately replaced with the present approach. The suitability of developed indices was tested in several flow problems by comparing the predicted erosional or depositional region with measured data. In addition, the developed indices were applied to a floodplain in a natural river to examine the relative spatial distribution of the erosion and deposition for a typhoon event, and the results were compared with field monitoring data. It was found that deposition was more likely to occur than erosion in most floodplains, and the developed floodplain sustainability indices accurately quantified the erosion and deposition phenomena. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable River Basin Management)
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Open AccessArticle Household Livelihood Strategy Choices, Impact Factors, and Environmental Consequences in Miyun Reservoir Watershed, China
Sustainability 2017, 9(2), 175; doi:10.3390/su9020175
Received: 5 December 2016 / Revised: 14 January 2017 / Accepted: 18 January 2017 / Published: 25 January 2017
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Abstract
Household livelihood strategies are embedded in the natural and socioeconomic contexts in which people live. Analyzing the factors that influence household livelihood choice and defining their consequences can be beneficial for informing rural household policies. In turn, this has great significance for fostering
[...] Read more.
Household livelihood strategies are embedded in the natural and socioeconomic contexts in which people live. Analyzing the factors that influence household livelihood choice and defining their consequences can be beneficial for informing rural household policies. In turn, this has great significance for fostering sustainable livelihood strategies. We grouped household livelihood strategies based on the income distribution of 756 households and analyzed their influencing factors and possible livelihood consequences in the watershed of Miyun Reservoir, the only source of surface water currently available for domestic use in Beijing, China. Local farmers’ livelihood strategies can be grouped into three types: farming, local off-farm, and labor-migrant. Farming households have the lowest livelihood capitals, other than natural capital, compared with labor-migrant households and off-farm households, the latter having better livelihood capital status. Geographical location, natural capital, household structure, labor quality, and ecological policies are the main factors affecting farmers’ choice of livelihood strategy. Local off-farm households have a significantly lower dependency on firewood, land resources, and investment than that of farming and labor-migrant households, and have the highest reliance on fossil fuel. This household classification can help us understand the livelihood characteristics, impact factors, and consequences of different types of household strategies, which also suggest tailored policy and management options to promote sustainable livelihoods based on different household types. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable River Basin Management)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Sustainable Ecosystem Services Framework for Tropical Catchment Management: A Review
Sustainability 2017, 9(4), 546; doi:10.3390/su9040546
Received: 6 February 2017 / Revised: 24 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 4 April 2017
PDF Full-text (1934 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The monsoon season is a natural phenomenon that occurs over the Asian continent, bringing extra precipitation which causes significant impact on most tropical watersheds. The tropical region’s countries are rich with natural rainforests and the economies of the countries situated within the region
[...] Read more.
The monsoon season is a natural phenomenon that occurs over the Asian continent, bringing extra precipitation which causes significant impact on most tropical watersheds. The tropical region’s countries are rich with natural rainforests and the economies of the countries situated within the region are mainly driven by the agricultural industry. In order to fulfill the agricultural demand, land clearing has worsened the situation by degrading the land surface areas. Rampant land use activities have led to land degradation and soil erosion, resulting in implications on water quality and sedimentation of the river networks. This affects the ecosystem services, especially the hydrological cycles. Intensification of the sedimentation process has resulted in shallower river systems, thus increasing their vulnerability to natural hazards (i.e., climate change, floods). Tropical forests which are essential in servicing their benefits have been depleted due to the increase in human exploitation. This paper provides an overview of the impact of land erosion caused by land use activities within tropical rainforest catchments, which lead to massive sedimentation in tropical rivers, as well as the effects of monsoon on fragile watersheds which can result in catastrophic floods. Forest ecosystems are very important in giving services to regional biogeochemical processes. Balanced ecosystems therefore, play a significant role in servicing humanity and ultimately, may create a new way of environmental management in a cost-effective manner. Essentially, such an understanding will help stakeholders to come up with better strategies in restoring the ecosystem services of tropical watersheds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable River Basin Management)
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