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Special Issue "Assessment and Governance of Sustainable Soil Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Katharina Helming

Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Müncheberg, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainability assessment; multifunctional land use; soil conservation; landscape synthesis
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Thomas Koellner

Faculty Biology, Chemistry und Geosciences GEO II, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ecosystem services
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bernd Hansjürgens

Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Department of Economics, Leipzig, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: economics of ecosystem services
Guest Editor
Dr. Katrin Daedlow

1. Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Müncheberg, Germany
2. Division Agriculture and Food Policy, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainability assessment; soil resource management; social-ecological systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The role of soil functions for achieving Sustainable Development Goals are multiple. A productivity function is essential for food and biomass provision in support of food security (SDG 2) and energy security (SDG 7); soil carbon sequestration, which is paramount for climate action (SDG 13); and water purification and retention, nutrient and matter cycling, and the habitat function are essential for maintaining ecosystem services (SDG 15). While these soil functions emerge from interactive soil processes, it is soil management that intervenes with soil processes and, thus, determines the functional performance of soils, relative to their geo-biophysical potentials. The key for sustainable soil management is to stimulate soil processes, such that antagonistic effects between functions are minimized and their performances are optimized. In addition to improved soil process knowledge, this requires profound interdisciplinary methods, built on systemic perspectives for the assessment and governance of sustainable soil management. What are the impacts of soil management practices on sustainability targets in specific geophysical and socio-economic contexts? What methodological approaches, indicators and metrics are suitable to assess, inter alia, resource efficiencies, ecosystem services, cost-benefit-rations, and risks to human health? What are the opportunities and risks of current and future soil management technologies with regards to sustainability targets? How can different spatio-temporal settings and spill-over effects be addressed? How can institutional compositions and governance instruments be improved to enable decision makers to take action on sustainable soil management? How can soil management impacts be valued in light of varying normative perspectives and ethical concepts? What roles do stakeholders and their perceptions play for impact valuing of soil management decision making?

This Special Issue welcomes original contributions dealing with methodological improvements and applications for impact assessment and governance of soil management systems from the perspective of sustainable developments. Thematic contributions may include: Farmer perceptions on soil management, metrics and indicators for assessing resource efficiency of soil management, relation between soil functions and ecosystem services, ethical considerations of sustainable soil management, institutional issues, governance instruments and policy analysis.

Prof. Dr. Katharina Helming
Prof. Dr. Thomas Koellner
Prof. Dr. Bernd Hansjürgens
Dr. Katrin Daedlow
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainability assessment
  • governance
  • soil management
  • soil functions
  • ecosystem services
  • resource efficiency
  • SDGs
  • indicators

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Sustainable Land Use, Soil Protection and Phosphorus Management from a Cross-National Perspective
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 1988; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061988
Received: 4 May 2018 / Revised: 7 June 2018 / Accepted: 10 June 2018 / Published: 13 June 2018
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Abstract
The scarcity of phosphorus (P) is a global concern that is not restricted to western industrialized nations. Until now, most countries in the world are highly dependent on importing mineral P fertilizers for agriculture. The industrialized nation of Germany, the emerging economy of
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The scarcity of phosphorus (P) is a global concern that is not restricted to western industrialized nations. Until now, most countries in the world are highly dependent on importing mineral P fertilizers for agriculture. The industrialized nation of Germany, the emerging economy of Costa Rica, and the developing country of Nicaragua are examined with regard to their legislation in the field of environmental protection and agriculture, in particular with regard to soil protection and fertilizer law. Based on the structure of agriculture in each country, control weaknesses in legislation in the individual countries, which is largely determined by command-and-control law, are identified and compared. It becomes clear that soil protection in all three countries has not yet been adequately standardised in law and at the same time the efficient use of organic or recycled P fertilizers instead of (finite) mineral P fertilizers is inadequately regulated. In particular, frugality, i.e., the strategy of lower (and not only more efficient) consumption of P fertilizers, has so far played no regulatory role in land-use governance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment and Governance of Sustainable Soil Management)
Open AccessArticle Assessment of Benefits of Conservation Agriculture on Soil Functions in Arable Production Systems in Europe
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 794; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030794
Received: 4 December 2017 / Revised: 8 March 2018 / Accepted: 10 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
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Abstract
Conventional farming (CONV) is the norm in European farming, causing adverse effects on some of the five major soil functions, viz. primary productivity, carbon sequestration and regulation, nutrient cycling and provision, water regulation and purification, and habitat for functional and intrinsic biodiversity. Conservation
[...] Read more.
Conventional farming (CONV) is the norm in European farming, causing adverse effects on some of the five major soil functions, viz. primary productivity, carbon sequestration and regulation, nutrient cycling and provision, water regulation and purification, and habitat for functional and intrinsic biodiversity. Conservation agriculture (CA) is an alternative to enhance soil functions. However, there is no analysis of CA benefits on the five soil functions as most studies addressed individual soil functions. The objective was to compare effects of CA and CONV practices on the five soil functions in four major environmental zones (Atlantic North, Pannonian, Continental and Mediterranean North) in Europe by applying expert scoring based on synthesis of existing literature. In each environmental zone, a team of experts scored the five soil functions due to CA and CONV treatments and median scores indicated the overall effects on five soil functions. Across the environmental zones, CONV had overall negative effects on soil functions with a median score of 0.50 whereas CA had overall positive effects with median score ranging from 0.80 to 0.83. The study proposes the need for field-based investigations, policies and subsidy support to benefit from CA adoption to enhance the five soil functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment and Governance of Sustainable Soil Management)
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Open AccessArticle Model Prediction of Secondary Soil Salinization in the Keriya Oasis, Northwest China
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 656; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030656
Received: 8 November 2017 / Revised: 8 February 2018 / Accepted: 15 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (17274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Significant anthropogenic and biophysical changes have caused fluctuations in the soil salinization area of the Keriya Oasis in China. The Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response (DPSIR) sustainability framework and Bayesian networks (BNs) were used to integrate information from anthropogenic and natural systems to model the trend of
[...] Read more.
Significant anthropogenic and biophysical changes have caused fluctuations in the soil salinization area of the Keriya Oasis in China. The Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response (DPSIR) sustainability framework and Bayesian networks (BNs) were used to integrate information from anthropogenic and natural systems to model the trend of secondary soil salinization. The developed model predicted that light salinization (vegetation coverage of around 15–20%, soil salt 5–10 g/kg) of the ecotone will increase in the near term but decelerate slightly in the future, and that farmland salinization will decrease in the near term. This trend is expected to accelerate in the future. Both trends are attributed to decreased water logging, increased groundwater exploitation, and decreased ratio of evaporation/precipitation. In contrast, severe salinization (vegetation coverage of around 2%, soil salt ≥20 g/kg) of the ecotone will increase in the near term. This trend will accelerate in the future because decreased river flow will reduce the flushing of severely salinized soil crust. Anthropogenic factors have negative impacts and natural causes have positive impacts on light salinization of ecotones. In situations involving severe farmland salinization, anthropogenic factors have persistent negative impacts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment and Governance of Sustainable Soil Management)
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Open AccessArticle Potential for Conservation Agriculture in the Dry Marginal Zone of Central Syria: A Preliminary Assessment
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 518; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020518
Received: 9 December 2017 / Revised: 28 January 2018 / Accepted: 1 February 2018 / Published: 14 February 2018
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Abstract
This paper reports on early soil related outcomes from conservation agriculture (CA) benchmark sites located within the marginal rainfed environment of agro-ecological zone 4 (annual rainfall: 200–250 mm) in pre-conflict central Syria. The outcomes reported are specifically those that relate to beneficial soil
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This paper reports on early soil related outcomes from conservation agriculture (CA) benchmark sites located within the marginal rainfed environment of agro-ecological zone 4 (annual rainfall: 200–250 mm) in pre-conflict central Syria. The outcomes reported are specifically those that relate to beneficial soil quality and water retention attributes relative to conventional tillage-based soil management practices applied to the fodder barley–livestock system, the dominant system in the zone. On-farm operational research was established to examine the impact of a barley (Hordeum vulgare) and vetch (Vicia sativa) rotation intercropped with atriplex (Atriplex halimus) and salsola (Salsola collina), under CA and conventional tillage agriculture, on the soil quality parameters and crop productivity. Preliminary results showed that CA had a positive effect on the soil quality parameters and crop performance. The soil moisture and hydraulic conductivity were higher under CA (p < 0.05), combined with improved productivity (grain and above-ground biomass) under specific crop mixes. The results suggest that despite the marginal nature of the zone, the use of CA is a viable option for the future of farmers’ livelihoods within similar localities and agro-climates, given the benefits for soil moisture and grain and straw productivity. In addition, it is likely to positively impact those in marginal environments where both pastoralism and agro-pastoralism production systems co-exist and compete for crop biomass as a main source of livestock feed. The increase in grain and straw yields vis-à-vis improvements in biophysical parameters in the CA system relative to tillage agriculture does suggest, however, that the competition with livestock for biomass is likely to reduce over time, and farmers would be able to return increased levels of straw (as stubble and residue) as mulch, given improved biomass yields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment and Governance of Sustainable Soil Management)
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