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Special Issue "Social-Ecological Restoration for Coastal Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Steven Scyphers

Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Northeastern University, Marine Science Center, Nahant, MA 01908, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: social-ecological systems; sustainability science; coastal development; fisheries; conservation
Co-Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Michael W. Beck

1. The Nature Conservancy, Arlington, VA 22203-1606, USA
2. Department of Ocean Sciences, Long Marine Lab, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal restoration is a widely popular strategy for improving the health of ecosystems and mitigating the impacts of previous human decisions. However, in addition to re-establishing habitats and the improving the functioning of ecosystems, restoration also provides many direct and indirect benefits for people in coastal communities and beyond. For example, coastal habitat restoration has been shown to enhance fisheries and tourism opportunities in coastal communities. Considering that restoration is often costly and requires substantial public and private support, understanding the social and ecological contexts of successful restoration is essential for sustainability and sustainable development along coastlines.

This Special Issue focuses on recent advances in the interdisciplinary science and practice of coastal restoration for pursuing sustainability. We welcome conceptual, empirical, and synthetic studies focused on the social and ecological dimensions of coastal restoration, and we are particularly eager to receive papers that embrace a social-ecological systems perspective to inform the design and execution of successful restoration. Such studies could involve: (i) describing social and ecological conditions that enable or constrain restoration support; (ii) developing strategies and frameworks for effectively measuring social and ecological outcomes of coastal restoration; (iii) defining social and ecological restoration success from rural to urban settings; and (iv) contextualizing role of restoration as a strategy for sustainable development along coastlines.

Prof. Steven Scyphers
Prof. Dr. Michael W. Beck
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Restoration
  • Social-ecological systems
  • Ecosystem services
  • Living shorelines
  • Human well-being

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Challenges and Proposals for Socio-Ecological Sustainability of the Tagus–Segura Aqueduct (Spain) under Climate Change
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2058; doi:10.3390/su9112058
Received: 20 July 2017 / Revised: 4 November 2017 / Accepted: 5 November 2017 / Published: 9 November 2017
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Abstract
Since its inauguration in 1979, the Tagus–Segura Aqueduct has become one of the hydraulic infrastructures that has had the most significant socio-economic repercussions in Spain during the past few decades. The aqueduct is significant for its strategic importance and developmental potential for south-east
[...] Read more.
Since its inauguration in 1979, the Tagus–Segura Aqueduct has become one of the hydraulic infrastructures that has had the most significant socio-economic repercussions in Spain during the past few decades. The aqueduct is significant for its strategic importance and developmental potential for south-east Spain, where it provides water for agriculture as well as for tourism and urban consumption. The aim of this study is to analyze the uncertainties regarding the future functioning of this infrastructure in view of the reduction of water resources and a higher frequency of drought episodes due to climate change. To this end, an analysis was performed on previous studies of hydrological plans, regulations and studies on climate change in order to enable an assessment to be made of the possible effects of these changes on the normal functions of the Tagus–Segura Aqueduct. Consideration is also given to the new management rules that have regulated this infrastructure since 2014, the use of alternative water resources, and proposals such as measures to increase resilience in light of future climate change scenarios and their effects on the Mediterranean. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social-Ecological Restoration for Coastal Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle The Environmental Conservation Value of the Saemangeum Open Sea in Korea
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2036; doi:10.3390/su9112036
Received: 16 August 2017 / Revised: 19 October 2017 / Accepted: 26 October 2017 / Published: 6 November 2017
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Abstract
The Saemangeum open sea (SOS), which refers to the outer sea of the Saemangeum seawall in Korea, is being threatened by contamination caused by the Saemangeum development project. The policy-makers need information on the environmental conservation value of the SOS for informed decision-making
[...] Read more.
The Saemangeum open sea (SOS), which refers to the outer sea of the Saemangeum seawall in Korea, is being threatened by contamination caused by the Saemangeum development project. The policy-makers need information on the environmental conservation value of the SOS for informed decision-making about the SOS. This paper attempts to measure the environmental conservation value of the SOS. To this end, the public’s willingness to pay (WTP) for conserving the SOS is derived from a 2015 contingent valuation survey of 1000 Korean households comprising 400 households residing in the Saemangeum area and 600 households living in other areas. The authors employ a one-and-one-half-bounded dichotomous choice question format. Moreover, the spike model is adopted to analyze the WTP data with zero observations. The mean annual WTP values for both areas are calculated to be KRW 3861 (USD 3.26) and KRW 3789 (USD 3.20) per household, respectively. They are statistically significant at the 1% level. When the sample is expanded to the whole country, it is worth KRW 70.9 billion (USD 59.8 million) per annum. Therefore, conserving the SOS will contribute to the Korean people’s utility and can be done with public support. The value provides a useful baseline for decision-making for the SOS management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social-Ecological Restoration for Coastal Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Social Perception of Ecosystem Services in a Coastal Wetland Post-Earthquake: A Case Study in Chile
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 1983; doi:10.3390/su9111983
Received: 6 August 2017 / Revised: 17 October 2017 / Accepted: 26 October 2017 / Published: 30 October 2017
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Abstract
Natural disasters can cause abrupt disturbances in coastal wetlands, affecting the social perception of ecosystem services (ES). The Tubul-Raqui coastal wetland is one of the most important wetlands in south-central Chile. Rich in biodiversity, these wetlands provide ES to a population of 2238
[...] Read more.
Natural disasters can cause abrupt disturbances in coastal wetlands, affecting the social perception of ecosystem services (ES). The Tubul-Raqui coastal wetland is one of the most important wetlands in south-central Chile. Rich in biodiversity, these wetlands provide ES to a population of 2238 inhabitants. The recent MW = 8.8 earthquake of 2010 caused a coastal uplift of 1.4 m and substantial morphological, social, and environmental changes. This paper analyzes the social perceptions of the inhabitants of the village of Tubul-Raqui following a large earthquake disturbance with regards to ES provision frequency and their future changes. A statistically representative semi-structured survey was conducted (175 valid surveys) and the data interpreted through factor analysis and statistical tests for independent categorical variables. The perception of cultural and regulating services was significantly greater than that of provisioning services, which were probably the most affected by the earthquake. Residents identified habitat for species, recreation, and hazard regulation as the most important ES. Perception was influenced by the categorical variables of gender, age, and ethnicity; for example, hazard regulation services varied strongly by gender. According to the respondents, the availability of ES will remain stable (50%) or decrease (40%) in the next 50 years, mainly due to anthropogenic drivers; the effect of natural disasters was not mentioned among the main drivers of change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social-Ecological Restoration for Coastal Sustainability)
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