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Special Issue "Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bon-Gang Hwang

Department of Building, School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore, 4 Architecture Drive, Singapore 117566, Singapore
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +65 6516 7488
Interests: sustainable construction management; project performance assessment and improvement; project productivity innovation and improvement; project risk management and decision making
Guest Editor
Dr. Ming Shan

Department of Building, School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore, 4 Architecture Drive, Singapore 117566, Singapore
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +65 8319 9008
Interests: sustainable construction management; professional ethics in construction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Along with a growing acknowledgement of sustainability among the global construction community, sustainable construction has achieved rapid growth over recent years. However, despite its prosperity, the sustainable construction sector is confronting various challenges and problems, particularly those from the perspective of management. Current literature shows that 30% of sustainable construction projects experience rework; 50% of sustainable construction projects are plagued by delay; and 90% of sustainable construction projects require cost premiums up to 21% to ensure their completion. In addition, existing research also show that sustainable construction projects are facing risks at a greater magnitude than conventional construction projects, and that sustainable construction projects have posed a greater safety hazard to frontline workers than conventional ones have. These sad facts are sending a strong signal to the authorities, industry and academia that, careful, close, and particular attention should now be devoted to management challenges and issues of sustainable construction projects. The purpose of this Special Issue of Sustainability is to solicit original theoretical, methodological, and empirical research papers relating to “Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction”. Review and opinion papers that summarize the state-of-the-art, research gaps and the further directions of the topic are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Bon-Gang Hwang
Dr. Ming Shan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable Development
  • Sustainable Construction Management
  • Sustainable Construction Economics
  • Sustainable Policy and Legislation
  • Ethics in Sustainable Construction
  • Environmental Impacts of Sustainable Construction
  • Green Building Project Management

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Impact of Transformational Leadership on Employee Sustainable Performance: The Mediating Role of Organizational Citizenship Behavior
Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1567; doi:10.3390/su9091567
Received: 18 August 2017 / Revised: 30 August 2017 / Accepted: 31 August 2017 / Published: 4 September 2017
PDF Full-text (431 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Transformational leadership has drawn extensive attention in management research. In this field, the influence of transformational leadership on employee performance is an important branch. Recent research indicates that organizational citizenship behavior plays a mediating role between transformational leadership and employee performance. However, some
[...] Read more.
Transformational leadership has drawn extensive attention in management research. In this field, the influence of transformational leadership on employee performance is an important branch. Recent research indicates that organizational citizenship behavior plays a mediating role between transformational leadership and employee performance. However, some of these findings contradict each other. Given the background where greater attention is being paid to transformational leadership in the construction industry, this research aims to find the degree of the influence of transformational leadership on employee sustainable performance, as well as the mediating role of organizational citizenship behavior. A total of 389 questionnaires were collected from contractors and analyzed via structural equation modeling. The findings reveal that employee sustainable performance is positively influenced by transformational leadership. In addition, more than half of that influence is mediated by their organizational citizenship behavior. These findings remind project managers of the need to pay close attention to transformational leadership, to cultivate organizational citizenship behavior, and thereby to eventually improve employee’s sustainable performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction)
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Open AccessArticle Factors Affecting the Capital Cost of Prefabrication—A Case Study of China
Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1512; doi:10.3390/su9091512
Received: 26 July 2017 / Revised: 21 August 2017 / Accepted: 21 August 2017 / Published: 24 August 2017
PDF Full-text (1122 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
As a sustainable construction method, prefabrication has become popular in many nations. However, there are many challenges for prefabrication, especially in terms of cost. Previous studies have revealed that higher capital cost was the most important barrier to the implementation of prefabrication. Thus,
[...] Read more.
As a sustainable construction method, prefabrication has become popular in many nations. However, there are many challenges for prefabrication, especially in terms of cost. Previous studies have revealed that higher capital cost was the most important barrier to the implementation of prefabrication. Thus, the objective of this study is to explore and evaluate the critical factors affecting the capital cost of prefabrication and examine how cost management may be affected by the “experience”, “corporate responsibility”, and “participant function” as a fix independent factors. To achieve the research objective, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 experts for the development of the questionnaire. Then, a questionnaire survey was conducted to investigate the significance of 49 factors related to prefabrication capital cost. The survey results revealed that “Specification and standards for prefabricated building design”, “Related experience of manager”, and “Rationality of precast component split” were the most critical factors. In addition, “experience”, “corporate responsibility”, and “participant function” had significant impact on the evaluation of capital cost factors. The findings can facilitate developing a benchmark framework for exploring the factors affecting the capital cost of prefabrication in China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction)
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Open AccessArticle Proximity Warning and Excavator Control System for Prevention of Collision Accidents
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1488; doi:10.3390/su9081488
Received: 26 July 2017 / Revised: 18 August 2017 / Accepted: 20 August 2017 / Published: 22 August 2017
PDF Full-text (15779 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Construction is a hazardous industry in which accidents occur frequently. Occupational accidents at construction sites are a serious public health issue in Korea. Construction site conditions often create dangerous situations by requiring workers and heavy equipment to work in close proximity to each
[...] Read more.
Construction is a hazardous industry in which accidents occur frequently. Occupational accidents at construction sites are a serious public health issue in Korea. Construction site conditions often create dangerous situations by requiring workers and heavy equipment to work in close proximity to each other. In 2015, approximately 11% (46) of the 437 occupational fatalities in the construction industry in Korea resulted from workers colliding with objects or equipment. In this paper, we present a proximity warning system developed to address this issue and enhance safety at construction sites. The proposed technology functions in real time to alert workers and equipment operators of hazardous proximity situations. Also, when the radio frequency identification (RFID) sensor detects an approaching worker, the main board instantly shuts down the excavator for the prevention of accident. This system contains an RFID tag, RFID reader, alarm device, camera, a display device (the Around View Monitor), and excavator control technology. A field test demonstrated successful performance of the proposed system. It is widely applicable in small construction fields alongside excavators and other equipment because this system does not require additional communication infrastructure, such as servers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction)
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Open AccessArticle Energy and Sustainable Strategies in the Renovation of Existing Buildings: An Italian Case Study
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1472; doi:10.3390/su9081472
Received: 6 July 2017 / Revised: 10 August 2017 / Accepted: 16 August 2017 / Published: 19 August 2017
PDF Full-text (10135 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The re-use of historical buildings, in some cases those that have been abandoned for years, is currently generating a lot of interest, and brings into discussion topics such as land recycling and the use of new resources. Our project on the rehabilitation of
[...] Read more.
The re-use of historical buildings, in some cases those that have been abandoned for years, is currently generating a lot of interest, and brings into discussion topics such as land recycling and the use of new resources. Our project on the rehabilitation of the former San Salvatore hospital in L’Aquila is an example of this re-use, and illustrates how best-practice strategies can be implemented in the rehabilitation of an existing building. There were two themes of evaluation: firstly, the adaptive re-use of a historical building of great impact in a strategic position within the urban core; secondly, the implementation of sustainable strategies when upgrading both the building envelope and building systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction)
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Open AccessArticle A Spatial-Territorial Reorganization Model of Rural Settlements Based on Graph Theory and Genetic Optimization
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1370; doi:10.3390/su9081370
Received: 26 June 2017 / Revised: 25 July 2017 / Accepted: 28 July 2017 / Published: 3 August 2017
PDF Full-text (3898 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rural China has experienced rapid urbanization and industrialization, accompanied with rural–urban migration since 1978. This tremendous transition has caused a series of negative consequences, necessitating a spatial-territorial reorganization of rural settlements. Previous studies on the restructuring of rural settlements are insufficient for inter-settlement
[...] Read more.
Rural China has experienced rapid urbanization and industrialization, accompanied with rural–urban migration since 1978. This tremendous transition has caused a series of negative consequences, necessitating a spatial-territorial reorganization of rural settlements. Previous studies on the restructuring of rural settlements are insufficient for inter-settlement connection consideration and practical and dynamic decision-making techniques. To overcome these concerns, a dynamic spatial-territorial reorganization model (SRM) of rural settlement is proposed herein based on graph theory and genetic algorithm (GA). The model involves two parts. In Part 1, consolidated settlements are identified according to the socio-economic network performance under four types of attack. In Part 2, GA model is repeatedly executed to scientifically resettle consolidated settlements into nearby townships or central settlements with objectives of suitability, compactness, and local connectivity under the control of the constraints. This paper presents an application of SRM to Chengui Town, Hubei Province. Empirical results suggest that: (1) removing settlements in order of node degree is the least efficient way to destroy the entire functional system; and (2) the proposed model can yield satisfactory solutions in terms of spatial reorganization of settlements. The SRM may also serve as a valuable reference for planners in devising plans and making decisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Half-Precast Concrete Slab System on Construction Productivity
Sustainability 2017, 9(7), 1268; doi:10.3390/su9071268
Received: 6 July 2017 / Revised: 14 July 2017 / Accepted: 17 July 2017 / Published: 19 July 2017
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Abstract
A half-precast concrete slab system (HPCSS) is reported to exhibit excellent structural performance when compared with traditional slab systems. However, there is a lack of extant research examining the construction issues of an HPCSS. Thus, in this study, we analyze the construction process
[...] Read more.
A half-precast concrete slab system (HPCSS) is reported to exhibit excellent structural performance when compared with traditional slab systems. However, there is a lack of extant research examining the construction issues of an HPCSS. Thus, in this study, we analyze the construction process and productivity of applying an HPCSS by using a simulation method with the data collected from an actual construction case. The results indicate that (i) the construction productivity of HPCSS is 1.7 times that of a traditional slab system, (ii) the cost per productivity unit of HPCSS exceeds that of a traditional slab system, and (iii) critical resources affecting the HPCSS productivity include form crew and rebar crew. The results of this study suggest that it is possible to develop an optimal construction plan of a construction site in which an HPCSS is installed, and that the HPCSS can be actively applied in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction)
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Open AccessArticle Incentive Model Based on Cooperative Relationship in Sustainable Construction Projects
Sustainability 2017, 9(7), 1191; doi:10.3390/su9071191
Received: 15 June 2017 / Revised: 3 July 2017 / Accepted: 4 July 2017 / Published: 6 July 2017
PDF Full-text (2707 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Considering the cooperative relationship between owners and contractors in sustainable construction projects, as well as the synergistic effects created by cooperative behaviors, a cooperative incentive model was developed using game theory. The model was formulated and analyzed under both non-moral hazard and moral
[...] Read more.
Considering the cooperative relationship between owners and contractors in sustainable construction projects, as well as the synergistic effects created by cooperative behaviors, a cooperative incentive model was developed using game theory. The model was formulated and analyzed under both non-moral hazard and moral hazard situations. Then, a numerical simulation and example were proposed to verify the conclusions derived from the model. The results showed that the synergistic effect increases the input intensity of one party’s resource transfer into the increase of marginal utility of the other party, thus the owner and contractor are willing to enhance their levels of effort. One party’s optimal benefit allocation coefficient is positively affected by its own output efficiency, and negatively affected by the other party’s output efficiency. The effort level and expected benefits of the owner and contractor can be improved by enhancing the cooperative relationship between the two parties, as well as enhancing the net benefits of a sustainable construction project. The synergistic effect cannot lower the negative effect of moral hazard behaviors during the implementation of sustainable construction projects. Conversely, the higher levels of the cooperative relationship, the wider the gaps amongst the optimal values under both non-moral hazard and moral hazard situations for the levels of effort, expected benefits and net project benefits. Since few studies to date have emphasized the effects of cooperative relationship on sustainable construction projects, this study constructed a game-based incentive model to bridge the gaps. This study contributes significant theoretical and practical insights into the management of cooperation amongst stakeholders, and into the enhancement of the overall benefits of sustainable construction projects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction)
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Open AccessArticle An Exploratory Analysis of Risks in Green Residential Building Construction Projects: The Case of Singapore
Sustainability 2017, 9(7), 1116; doi:10.3390/su9071116
Received: 23 May 2017 / Revised: 19 June 2017 / Accepted: 24 June 2017 / Published: 26 June 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (480 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recently, an increasing number of green residential buildings have been developed worldwide owing to active promotion from the authorities and increasing interest from customers. However, in the same way as traditional residential buildings, the construction of green residential buildings faces various risks. The
[...] Read more.
Recently, an increasing number of green residential buildings have been developed worldwide owing to active promotion from the authorities and increasing interest from customers. However, in the same way as traditional residential buildings, the construction of green residential buildings faces various risks. The aims of this study are to identify and assess the diverse risks in green residential building construction projects, compare their risk criticalities with those in traditional counterparts, and propose helpful risk mitigation measures. To achieve these goals, a comprehensive literature review was first conducted, and a questionnaire was then administered to 30 construction companies in Singapore. Survey results showed that “complex procedures to obtain approvals”, “overlooked high initial cost”, “unclear requirements of owners”, “employment constraint”, and “lack of availability of green materials and equipment” were the top five critical risks in green residential building construction projects. Survey results also showed that green residential building projects were facing risks at a more critical level than those traditional residential building projects. Additionally, this study proposed fourteen risk mitigation measures to tackle the risks in green residential building construction projects. This study has contributed to the body of knowledge by identifying and evaluating the critical risks and mitigation measures in green residential building construction projects. Meanwhile, the findings from this study can also provide an in-depth understanding of risk management in green residential building construction projects to practitioners and thus benefit the practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction)
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Open AccessArticle Evaluation of the Policy of the Creative Industry for Urban Development
Sustainability 2017, 9(6), 1009; doi:10.3390/su9061009
Received: 26 April 2017 / Revised: 26 May 2017 / Accepted: 2 June 2017 / Published: 11 June 2017
PDF Full-text (1548 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Culture, an intellectual capital of a city, is accumulated through the intellect and wisdom of the government, citizens, businesses and other organizations. Cities regardless of their size are seeking their own distinguishing features and positions. By combining culture and creativity to improve international
[...] Read more.
Culture, an intellectual capital of a city, is accumulated through the intellect and wisdom of the government, citizens, businesses and other organizations. Cities regardless of their size are seeking their own distinguishing features and positions. By combining culture and creativity to improve international visibility, cities can develop new potentials, create job opportunities and boost economic growth. Therefore, cultural and creative industries have become the core industries that cities worldwide actively seek to develop; furthermore, various city governments have unanimously agreed that the creative industry will effectively improve urban economic competitiveness. This study investigated how the creative industry improved urban competitiveness, developed relevant assessment indexes and formulated policies for developing the creative industry. First, the fuzzy Delphi method was adopted to determine the indexes for assessing the creative industry’s positive influence on urban competitiveness. Subsequently, the analytic hierarchy process and the analytic network process were integrated to establish a model for assessing city-based creative industry development policies. City governments seeking to promote such policies can refer to this model. Finally, an importance-performance analysis was performed to investigate the satisfaction for policies related to creative industries, providing a reference for governments to promote pertinent policies. The results of this study indicated that the indexes of innovation capability, industrial cooperation, innovation incubation and industry-government-academia integration are crucial bases for cities to develop the creative industry. In addition, the policies of industrial R&D and clustering, talent training and industrial consulting and expanding industrial and marketing channels and networks can be adopted to enhance creative industry development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction)
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Open AccessArticle Strategies for Promoting Green Building Technologies Adoption in the Construction Industry—An International Study
Sustainability 2017, 9(6), 969; doi:10.3390/su9060969
Received: 25 May 2017 / Revised: 2 June 2017 / Accepted: 2 June 2017 / Published: 6 June 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (705 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Because green building technologies (GBTs) adoption is a promising way of ameliorating the sustainability performance of buildings, GBTs are receiving increased interest in the global construction community. The barriers to the adoption of GBTs, such as higher cost and lack of awareness, further
[...] Read more.
Because green building technologies (GBTs) adoption is a promising way of ameliorating the sustainability performance of buildings, GBTs are receiving increased interest in the global construction community. The barriers to the adoption of GBTs, such as higher cost and lack of awareness, further indicate that proper strategies need to be devised for promoting the wider adoption of GBTs in buildings development. However, there exist limited empirical studies identifying the strategies for promoting GBTs adoption in the construction industry. This study aims to identify the strategies that are important for promoting GBTs adoption in construction. After a comprehensive literature review to identify strategies for the promotion of GBTs adoption, empirical data were gleaned through a questionnaire survey with 104 green building experts around the world. The analysis results validated the importance of all of the 12 promotion strategies used for the study. Green building experts from different countries and with different backgrounds had significant agreement on the relative importance ranking of the promotion strategies. Furthermore, “financial and further market-based incentives for GBTs adopters”, “availability of better information on cost and benefits of GBTs”, “mandatory governmental policies and regulations”, and “green rating and labeling” were identified as the top four important promotion strategies. The research findings provide a valuable reference to assist practitioners and policy makers in developing practical strategies for promoting GBTs adoption to eventually achieve the sustainable development of buildings. From the perspective of international experts, this study adds to the green building literature by offering empirical evidence of the important strategies for promoting GBTs adoption in the construction industry. Future research will investigate the interrelationships among the promotion strategies and their impacts on the GBTs adoption process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies and Innovations for Sustainable Construction)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Experts Opinion on Sustainability and Eco-Labelling for Construction Products
Authors: Mariia Rochikashvili and Jan C. Bongaerts
Abstract: Interior wall paints and coatings may evaporate hazardous emissions such as volatile organic compound and formaldehyde. In fact, formaldehydes and volatile organic compounds are
listed by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as well-known human carcinogens [1,2]. Hence, for paint products, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) contain toxicological and environmental information as well as advice on safe handling practices. In this regard, paint manufacturers have an obligation to supply the MSDSs to professional users but not to end-users [3]. However, end-users may be at risk as they have to request MSDSs at their local building supplies store or read MSDSs online prior to a purchase of any paint product. Furthermore, an Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) describes effects of construction products on the environment and human health. An EPD is a certificate for a construction product which is based on a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of this product. As this research shows, only a limited number of German paint manufacturers provide EPDs with their products. Finding a solution to point the end-users’ awareness towards hazardous emissions, as mentioned above, is not an easy task.
Keywords: sustainability; Material Safety Data Sheets; Life Cycle Assessment; Environmental Product Declaration; qualitative study; interior paints; expert users

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