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Special Issue "Aptasensors"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Beate Strehlitz

Department Environmental and Biotechnology Centre, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
E-Mail
Phone: +49 341 2351764
Fax: +49 341 2351764
Interests: biosensor development and application; aptamer selection and characterization; aptamer based sensors and assays

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aptamers are a very attractive class of biologic receptor molecules being in great demand in the development of new biosensors, so-called aptasensors. Aptamers are short single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides able to bind with high affinity and specificity to their target. They are usually generated by an in vitro selection and amplification technology (SELEX). From a large oligonucleotide library with big sequence diversity and structural complexity only those oligonucleotides are selected and enriched during several selection rounds which can bind very tightly to the specific molecular target. Aptamer development and application increased in the last decades. Aptamers are favourably used in biosensors as sensitive and selective bio-receptors coupled with a variety of transducer principles such as optical, mass-sensitive and electrochemical detection. The analytes cover a wide range from small molecules, like nucleotides, cofactors, amino acids, organic molecules over peptides, polysaccharides and proteins to complex structures like whole cells, viruses and single cell organisms. Aptasensors offer great potential to measure substances in clinical diagnostics, environmental analytics, food and biotechnology industries, process engineering and others. The Special Issue will publish those full research, review and high rated manuscripts addressing the development and application of aptamer based biosensors.

Dr. Beate Strehlitz
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • aptamers
  • biosensor
  • affinity sensor
  • electrochemical
  • optical
  • mass sensitive
  • label- and label-free detection

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Displaying articles 1-9
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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics
Sensors 2014, 14(2), 3737-3755; doi:10.3390/s140203737
Received: 29 October 2013 / Revised: 20 January 2014 / Accepted: 30 January 2014 / Published: 21 February 2014
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (1257 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a
[...] Read more.
Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptasensors)
Open AccessArticle Development of an Antigen-DNAzyme Based Probe for a Direct Antibody-Antigen Assay Using the Intrinsic DNAzyme Activity of a Daunomycin Aptamer
Sensors 2014, 14(1), 346-355; doi:10.3390/s140100346
Received: 31 October 2013 / Revised: 9 December 2013 / Accepted: 13 December 2013 / Published: 27 December 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (407 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
G-Quadruplex (G-4) structures are formed when G-rich DNA sequences fold into intra- or intermolecular four-stranded structures in the presence of metal ions. G-4-hemin complexes are often effective peroxidase-mimicking DNAzymes that are applied in many detection systems. This work reports the application of a
[...] Read more.
G-Quadruplex (G-4) structures are formed when G-rich DNA sequences fold into intra- or intermolecular four-stranded structures in the presence of metal ions. G-4-hemin complexes are often effective peroxidase-mimicking DNAzymes that are applied in many detection systems. This work reports the application of a G-rich daunomycin-specific aptamer for the development of an antibody-antigen detection assay. We investigated the ability of the daunomycin aptamer to efficiently catalyze the hemin-dependent peroxidase activity independent of daunomycin. A reporter probe consisting of biotinylated antigen and daunomycin aptamer coupled to streptavidin gold nanoparticles was successfully used to generate a colorimetric readout. In conclusion, the daunomycin aptamer can function as a robust alternative DNAzyme for the development of colorimetric assays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptasensors)
Open AccessArticle Impedimetric Aptasensor for Ochratoxin A Determination Based on Au Nanoparticles Stabilized with Hyper-Branched Polymer
Sensors 2013, 13(12), 16129-16145; doi:10.3390/s131216129
Received: 22 October 2013 / Revised: 14 November 2013 / Accepted: 18 November 2013 / Published: 26 November 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1430 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An impedimetric aptasensor for ochratoxin A (OTA) detection has been developed on the base of a gold electrode covered with a new modifier consisting of electropolymerized Neutral Red and a mixture of Au nanoparticles suspended in the dendrimeric polymer Botlorn H30®.
[...] Read more.
An impedimetric aptasensor for ochratoxin A (OTA) detection has been developed on the base of a gold electrode covered with a new modifier consisting of electropolymerized Neutral Red and a mixture of Au nanoparticles suspended in the dendrimeric polymer Botlorn H30®. Thiolated aptamer specific to OTA was covalently attached to Au nanoparticles via Au-S bonding. The interaction of the aptamer with OTA induced the conformational switch of the aptamer from linear to guanine quadruplex form followed by consolidation of the surface layer and an increase of the charge transfer resistance. The aptasensor makes it possible to detect from 0.1 to 100 nM of OTA (limit of detection: 0.02 nM) in the presence of at least 50 fold excess of ochratoxin B. The applicability of the aptasensor for real sample assay was confirmed by testing spiked beer samples. The recovery of 2 nM OTA was found to be 70% for light beer and 78% for dark beer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptasensors)
Open AccessArticle Biostable ssDNA Aptamers Specific for Hodgkin Lymphoma
Sensors 2013, 13(11), 14543-14557; doi:10.3390/s131114543
Received: 29 August 2013 / Revised: 17 October 2013 / Accepted: 18 October 2013 / Published: 25 October 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1128 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As a “chemical antibody”, oligonucleotide aptamers can specifically bind to their target molecules. However, clinical potential of aptamers in disease diagnosis is not yet fully explored. Using a tumor cell-based selection protocol, we developed single-stranded DNA aptamers for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) tumor cells.
[...] Read more.
As a “chemical antibody”, oligonucleotide aptamers can specifically bind to their target molecules. However, clinical potential of aptamers in disease diagnosis is not yet fully explored. Using a tumor cell-based selection protocol, we developed single-stranded DNA aptamers for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) tumor cells. The aptamers specifically bound to HL cells with a high affinity, reaching maximal cell binding at 10 nM final concentration. Importantly, the aptamers were able to selectively detect HL cells and did not react to other tumor or blood cells in mixed samples, indicating that the aptamers can be used as a specific probe for in vitro analysis of HL cells. Moreover, due to the inherent properties of DNA, the aptamers were stable in human serum, suggesting potential for in vivo detection of HL tumor cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptasensors)
Open AccessArticle Development of a Multiplex Sandwich Aptamer Microarray for the Detection of VEGF165 and Thrombin
Sensors 2013, 13(10), 13425-13438; doi:10.3390/s131013425
Received: 30 August 2013 / Revised: 20 September 2013 / Accepted: 29 September 2013 / Published: 3 October 2013
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (517 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this work we have developed a multiplex microarray system capable of detecting VEGF165 and thrombin. We recently described a Sandwich Aptamer Microarray (SAM) for thrombin detection feasible for use in multiplex microarrays; here we describe a new aptasensor for VEGF165
[...] Read more.
In this work we have developed a multiplex microarray system capable of detecting VEGF165 and thrombin. We recently described a Sandwich Aptamer Microarray (SAM) for thrombin detection feasible for use in multiplex microarrays; here we describe a new aptasensor for VEGF165 detection employing Vap7 and VEa5, two DNA aptamers recognizing different sites of the protein. The aptamers were modified to be adapted to the solid phase platform of SAM and their capability to simultaneously recognize VEGF165 by forming a ternary complex was analyzed in solution. Having so defined the best tandem arrangement of modified aptamers, we set up the aptasensor for VEGF165, and finally analyzed the multiplex system with the two aptasensors for the simultaneous detection of VEGF165 and thrombin. The results indicate that each sandwich is specific, even when the two proteins are mixed. The system performance is consistent with the behavior evidenced by the biochemical analysis, which proves to be valuable to drive the evaluation and refinement of aptamers prior to or along the development of a detection platform. Since thrombin upregulates VEGF expression, the simultaneous recognition of these two proteins could be useful in the analysis of biomarkers in pathologies characterized by neo-angiogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptasensors)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Smart Materials Based on DNA Aptamers: Taking Aptasensing to the Next Level
Sensors 2014, 14(2), 3156-3171; doi:10.3390/s140203156
Received: 18 November 2013 / Revised: 10 January 2014 / Accepted: 8 February 2014 / Published: 18 February 2014
Cited by 21 | PDF Full-text (700 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
“Smart” materials are an emerging category of multifunctional materials with physical or chemical properties that can be controllably altered in response to an external stimulus. By combining the standard properties of the advanced material with the unique ability to recognize and adapt in
[...] Read more.
“Smart” materials are an emerging category of multifunctional materials with physical or chemical properties that can be controllably altered in response to an external stimulus. By combining the standard properties of the advanced material with the unique ability to recognize and adapt in response to a change in their environment, these materials are finding applications in areas such as sensing and drug delivery.  While the majority of these materials are responsive to physical or chemical changes, a particularly exciting area of research seeks to develop smart materials that are sensitive to specific molecular or biomolecular stimuli. These systems require the integration of a molecular recognition probe specific to the target molecule of interest. The ease of synthesis and labeling, low cost, and stability of DNA aptamers make them uniquely suited to effectively serve as molecular recognition probes in novel smart material systems. This review will highlight current work in the area of aptamer-based smart materials and prospects for their future applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptasensors)
Figures

Open AccessReview Aptamer-Based Analysis: A Promising Alternative for Food Safety Control
Sensors 2013, 13(12), 16292-16311; doi:10.3390/s131216292
Received: 31 October 2013 / Revised: 20 November 2013 / Accepted: 21 November 2013 / Published: 28 November 2013
Cited by 25 | PDF Full-text (598 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Ensuring food safety is nowadays a top priority of authorities and professional players in the food supply chain. One of the key challenges to determine the safety of food and guarantee a high level of consumer protection is the availability of fast, sensitive
[...] Read more.
Ensuring food safety is nowadays a top priority of authorities and professional players in the food supply chain. One of the key challenges to determine the safety of food and guarantee a high level of consumer protection is the availability of fast, sensitive and reliable analytical methods to identify specific hazards associated to food before they become a health problem. The limitations of existing methods have encouraged the development of new technologies, among them biosensors. Success in biosensor design depends largely on the development of novel receptors with enhanced affinity to the target, while being stable and economical. Aptamers fulfill these characteristics, and thus have surfaced as promising alternatives to natural receptors. This Review describes analytical strategies developed so far using aptamers for the control of pathogens, allergens, adulterants, toxins and other forbidden contaminants to ensure food safety. The main progresses to date are presented, highlighting potential prospects for the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptasensors)
Open AccessReview Recent Advances and Achievements in Nanomaterial-Based, and Structure Switchable Aptasensing Platforms for Ochratoxin A Detection
Sensors 2013, 13(11), 15187-15208; doi:10.3390/s131115187
Received: 25 September 2013 / Revised: 28 October 2013 / Accepted: 4 November 2013 / Published: 6 November 2013
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (396 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Aptamer-based bioreceptors that can easily adopt their surroundings have captured the attention of scientists from a wide spectrum of domains in designing highly sensitive, selective and structure switchable sensing assays. Through elaborate design and chemical functionalization, numerous aptamer-based assays have been developed that
[...] Read more.
Aptamer-based bioreceptors that can easily adopt their surroundings have captured the attention of scientists from a wide spectrum of domains in designing highly sensitive, selective and structure switchable sensing assays. Through elaborate design and chemical functionalization, numerous aptamer-based assays have been developed that can switch their conformation upon incubation with target analyte, resulting in an enhanced output signal. To further lower the detection limits to picomolar levels, nanomaterials have attracted great interest in the design of aptamer-based sensing platforms. Associated to their unique properties, nanomaterials offer great promise for numerous aptasensing applications. This review will discuss current research activities in the aptasensing with typical example of detection of ochratoxin A (OTA). OTA, a secondary fungal metabolite, contaminates a variety of food commodities, and has several toxicological effects such as nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, neurotoxic, teratogenic and immunotoxic activities. The review will introduce advances made in the methods of integrating nanomaterials in aptasensing, and will discuss current conformational switchable design strategies in aptasensor fabrication methodologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptasensors)
Open AccessReview Aptamers as Theranostic Agents: Modifications, Serum Stability and Functionalisation
Sensors 2013, 13(10), 13624-13637; doi:10.3390/s131013624
Received: 7 August 2013 / Revised: 24 September 2013 / Accepted: 27 September 2013 / Published: 10 October 2013
Cited by 25 | PDF Full-text (449 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Aptamers, and the selection process known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) used to generate them, were first described more than twenty years ago. Since then, there have been numerous modifications to the selection procedures. This review discusses the use
[...] Read more.
Aptamers, and the selection process known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) used to generate them, were first described more than twenty years ago. Since then, there have been numerous modifications to the selection procedures. This review discusses the use of modified bases as a means of enhancing serum stability and producing effective therapeutic tools, as well as functionalising these nucleic acids to be used as potential diagnostic agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptasensors)

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