Special Issue "Calcium Signaling in Plants"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2013)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gerald A. Berkowitz

Agricultural Biotechnology Laboratory U-4163, Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 860 486 0534
Interests: ion channels; plant innate immunity; calcium signaling
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Sylvia Lindberg

Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, Lilla Frescati, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +46 8 165525
Interests: plasma membrane properties and signal transduction in plant cells under abiotic stress
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Yi Ma

Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
E-Mail
Interests: calcium signaling; plant innate immunity
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Zhi Qi

College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia Uniiversity, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, China
E-Mail
Interests: Ca signal; channel; root

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ca2+ is a universal and ubiquitous secondary messenger that initiates cytosolic signal transduction cascades in cells of organisms from all biological kingdoms responding to myriad extracellular ligands. In plants, cytosolic Ca2+ elevation provides a molecular mechanism that facilitates perception of environmental and internal cues and translation of such perception into altered gene expression and cellular function. Ca2+ signaling cascades require molecular steps that involve the following mechanisms. a) Perception of a signal by a receptor. b) Translation of signal perception into an increase in Ca2+ conduction into the cytosol. c) 'Decoding' of the Ca2+ signal by proteins that can sense transient Ca2+ elevation from homeostatic levels. And d) downstream protein components of the signaling cascade that respond to Ca2+ sensor proteins to facilitate transcriptional reprogramming, altered cell growth and development, and/or increased system fitness. Recent progress in plant Ca2+ signaling has been associated with new insights into all of these aforementioned steps of signaling pathways. In addition, recent work has provided a more intimate linkage of cytosolic Ca2+ signaling and some specific plant physiological processes.

These developments include the identification of specific gene products that are components of Ca2+-conducting ion channel proteins. These Ca2+ transporters include proteins such as annexins, glutamate receptors, and cyclic nucleotide gated channels. Contributions of Ca2+ ATPases and antiporters to 'shaping' Ca2+ signals have also been uncovered. The roles played by Ca2+-binding proteins such as Ca2+-dependent kinases, calmodulins (and calmodulin-like proteins), and calcineurin B-like proteins in numerous signaling cascades have begun to be elucidated. The involvement (in various signaling pathways) of altered Ca2+ levels in plant cell organelles (such as the nucleus) besides the cytosol has been uncovered. Recent work has also led to refinements in our understanding of Ca2+ signal involvement in environmental cues (gravity, circadean rhythms), hormone responses (e.g., auxin), abiotic (e.g., heat shock) and biotic (e.g., pathogen immunity) stress perception, and 'directed' cell growth (e.g., pollen tubes, cell hairs, and formation of Rhizobium sp.-associated root nodules).

This Special Issue hopes to provide a unique compendium that highlights these new developments in our understanding of how this critical messenger molecule contributes to plant function, growth, and response to the environment. Contributions to this special issue are welcomed from scientists working at all system levels, including molecule, cell, organism and environment/ecological perspectives. Studies addressing any of the above aspects of plant cell Ca2+ signaling would be appropriate contributions.

Prof. Dr. Gerry Berkowitz
Prof. Dr. Sylvia Lindberg
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • Ca2+ ion channels
  • EF-hand proteins
  • calmodulin
  • Ca2+ protein kinase
  • calcineurin
  • Ca2+ ATPase
  • signal transduction

Published Papers (9 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-9
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Ca2+-Transport through Plasma Membrane as a Test of Auxin Sensitivity
Plants 2014, 3(2), 209-222; doi:10.3390/plants3020209
Received: 5 November 2013 / Revised: 9 March 2014 / Accepted: 13 March 2014 / Published: 26 March 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (491 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Auxin is one of the crucial regulators of plant growth and development. The discovered auxin cytosolic receptor (TIR1) is not involved in the perception of the hormone signal at the plasma membrane. Instead, another receptor, related to the ABP1, auxin binding protein1, is
[...] Read more.
Auxin is one of the crucial regulators of plant growth and development. The discovered auxin cytosolic receptor (TIR1) is not involved in the perception of the hormone signal at the plasma membrane. Instead, another receptor, related to the ABP1, auxin binding protein1, is supposed to be responsible for the perception at the plasma membrane. One of the fast and sensitive auxin-induced reactions is an increase of Ca2+ cytosolic concentration, which is suggested to be dependent on the activation of Ca2+ influx through the plasma membrane. This investigation was carried out with a plasmalemma enriched vesicle fraction, obtained from etiolated maize coleoptiles. The magnitude of Ca2+ efflux through the membrane vesicles was estimated according to the shift of potential dependent fluorescent dye diS-C3-(5). The obtained results showed that during coleoptiles ageing (3rd, 4th and 5th days of seedling etiolated growth) the magnitude of Ca2+ efflux from inside-out vesicles was decreased. Addition of ABP1 led to a recovery of Ca2+ efflux to the level of the youngest and most sensitive cells. Moreover, the efflux was more sensitive, responding from 10−8 to 10−6 M 1-NAA, in vesicles containing ABP1, whereas native vesicles showed the highest efflux at 10−6 M 1-NAA. We suggest that auxin increases plasma membrane permeability to Ca2+ and that ABP1 is involved in modulation of this reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Calcium Signaling in Plants)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Experimental Measurements and Mathematical Modeling of Cytosolic Ca2+ Signatures upon Elicitation by Penta-N-acetylchitopentaose Oligosaccharides in Nicotiana tabacum Cell Cultures
Plants 2013, 2(4), 750-768; doi:10.3390/plants2040750
Received: 29 September 2013 / Revised: 4 November 2013 / Accepted: 8 November 2013 / Published: 27 November 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (506 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Plants have developed sophisticated recognition systems for different kinds of pathogens. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) can induce various defense mechanisms, e.g., the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as an early event. Plant defense reactions are initiated by a signal transduction cascade involving
[...] Read more.
Plants have developed sophisticated recognition systems for different kinds of pathogens. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) can induce various defense mechanisms, e.g., the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as an early event. Plant defense reactions are initiated by a signal transduction cascade involving the release of calcium ions (Ca2+) from both external and internal stores to the plant cytoplasm. This work focuses on the analysis of cytosolic Ca2+ signatures, experimentally and theoretically. Cytosolic Ca2+ signals were measured in Nicotiana tabacum plant cell cultures after elicitation with penta-N-acetylchitopentaose oligosaccharides (Ch5). In order to allow a mathematical simulation of the elicitor-triggered Ca2+ release, the Li and Rinzel model was adapted to the situation in plants. The main features of the Ca2+ response, like the specific shape of the Ca2+ transient and the dose-response relationship, could be reproduced very well. Repeated elicitation of the same cell culture revealed a refractory behavior with respect to the Ca2+ transients for this condition. Detailed analysis of the obtained data resulted in further modifications of the mathematical model, allowing a predictive simulation of Ch5-induced Ca2+ transients. The promising results may contribute to a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing plant defense. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Calcium Signaling in Plants)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Identification of CP12 as a Novel Calcium-Binding Protein in Chloroplasts
Plants 2013, 2(3), 530-540; doi:10.3390/plants2030530
Received: 11 July 2013 / Revised: 8 August 2013 / Accepted: 19 August 2013 / Published: 26 August 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (494 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Calcium plays an important role in the regulation of several chloroplast processes. However, very little is still understood about the calcium fluxes or calcium-binding proteins present in plastids. Indeed, classical EF-hand containing calcium-binding proteins appears to be mostly absent from plastids. In the
[...] Read more.
Calcium plays an important role in the regulation of several chloroplast processes. However, very little is still understood about the calcium fluxes or calcium-binding proteins present in plastids. Indeed, classical EF-hand containing calcium-binding proteins appears to be mostly absent from plastids. In the present study we analyzed the stroma fraction of Arabidopsis chloroplasts for the presence of novel calcium-binding proteins using 2D-PAGE separation followed by calcium overlay assay. A small acidic protein was identified by mass spectrometry analyses as the chloroplast protein CP12 and the ability of CP12 to bind calcium was confirmed with recombinant proteins. CP12 plays an important role in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle participating in the assembly of a supramolecular complex between phosphoribulokinase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, indicating that calcium signaling could play a role in regulating carbon fixation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Calcium Signaling in Plants)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Functions of Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Plant Innate Immunity
Plants 2014, 3(1), 160-176; doi:10.3390/plants3010160
Received: 3 September 2013 / Revised: 20 January 2014 / Accepted: 6 February 2014 / Published: 5 March 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (555 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An increase of cytosolic Ca2+ is generated by diverse physiological stimuli and stresses, including pathogen attack. Plants have evolved two branches of the immune system to defend against pathogen infections. The primary innate immune response is triggered by the detection of evolutionarily
[...] Read more.
An increase of cytosolic Ca2+ is generated by diverse physiological stimuli and stresses, including pathogen attack. Plants have evolved two branches of the immune system to defend against pathogen infections. The primary innate immune response is triggered by the detection of evolutionarily conserved pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), which is called PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). The second branch of plant innate immunity is triggered by the recognition of specific pathogen effector proteins and known as effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Calcium (Ca2+) signaling is essential in both plant PTI and ETI responses. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have emerged as important Ca2+ sensor proteins in transducing differential Ca2+ signatures, triggered by PAMPs or effectors and activating complex downstream responses. CDPKs directly transmit calcium signals by calcium binding to the elongation factor (EF)-hand domain at the C-terminus and substrate phosphorylation by the catalytic kinase domain at the N-terminus. Emerging evidence suggests that specific and overlapping CDPKs phosphorylate distinct substrates in PTI and ETI to regulate diverse plant immune responses, including production of reactive oxygen species, transcriptional reprogramming of immune genes, and the hypersensitive response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Calcium Signaling in Plants)
Open AccessReview Annexin-Mediated Calcium Signalling in Plants
Plants 2014, 3(1), 128-140; doi:10.3390/plants3010128
Received: 20 December 2013 / Revised: 13 February 2014 / Accepted: 19 February 2014 / Published: 26 February 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (284 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Calcium-permeable channels underpin elevations of free calcium that encode specific signals in stress adaptation, development and immunity. Identifying the genes encoding these channels remains a central goal of plant signalling research. Evidence now suggests that members of the plant annexin family function as
[...] Read more.
Calcium-permeable channels underpin elevations of free calcium that encode specific signals in stress adaptation, development and immunity. Identifying the genes encoding these channels remains a central goal of plant signalling research. Evidence now suggests that members of the plant annexin family function as unconventional calcium-permeable channels, with roles in development and stress signalling. Arabidopsis annexin 1 mediates a plasma membrane calcium-permeable conductance in roots that is activated by reactive oxygen species. Recombinant annexin 1 forms a very similar conductance in planar lipid bilayers, indicating that this protein could facilitate the in vivo conductance directly. The annexin 1 mutant is impaired in salinity-induced calcium signalling. Protein–protein interactions, post-translational modification and dynamic association with membranes could all influence annexin-mediated calcium signalling and are reviewed here. The prospect of annexins playing roles in calcium signalling events in symbiosis and immunity are considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Calcium Signaling in Plants)
Open AccessReview Calcium: The Missing Link in Auxin Action
Plants 2013, 2(4), 650-675; doi:10.3390/plants2040650
Received: 5 August 2013 / Revised: 7 October 2013 / Accepted: 10 October 2013 / Published: 21 October 2013
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (654 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Due to their sessile lifestyles, plants need to deal with the limitations and stresses imposed by the changing environment. Plants cope with these by a remarkable developmental flexibility, which is embedded in their strategy to survive. Plants can adjust their size, shape and
[...] Read more.
Due to their sessile lifestyles, plants need to deal with the limitations and stresses imposed by the changing environment. Plants cope with these by a remarkable developmental flexibility, which is embedded in their strategy to survive. Plants can adjust their size, shape and number of organs, bend according to gravity and light, and regenerate tissues that were damaged, utilizing a coordinating, intercellular signal, the plant hormone, auxin. Another versatile signal is the cation, Ca2+, which is a crucial second messenger for many rapid cellular processes during responses to a wide range of endogenous and environmental signals, such as hormones, light, drought stress and others. Auxin is a good candidate for one of these Ca2+-activating signals. However, the role of auxin-induced Ca2+ signaling is poorly understood. Here, we will provide an overview of possible developmental and physiological roles, as well as mechanisms underlying the interconnection of Ca2+ and auxin signaling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Calcium Signaling in Plants)
Open AccessReview Interaction between Calcium and Actin in Guard Cell and Pollen Signaling Networks
Plants 2013, 2(4), 615-634; doi:10.3390/plants2040615
Received: 14 August 2013 / Revised: 25 September 2013 / Accepted: 26 September 2013 / Published: 15 October 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (376 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Calcium (Ca2+) plays important roles in plant growth, development, and signal transduction. It is a vital nutrient for plant physical design, such as cell wall and membrane, and also serves as a counter-cation for biochemical, inorganic, and organic anions, and more
[...] Read more.
Calcium (Ca2+) plays important roles in plant growth, development, and signal transduction. It is a vital nutrient for plant physical design, such as cell wall and membrane, and also serves as a counter-cation for biochemical, inorganic, and organic anions, and more particularly, its concentration change in cytosol is a ubiquitous second messenger in plant physiological signaling in responses to developmental and environmental stimuli. Actin cytoskeleton is well known for its importance in cellular architecture maintenance and its significance in cytoplasmic streaming and cell division. In plant cell system, the actin dynamics is a process of polymerization and de-polymerization of globular actin and filamentous actin and that acts as an active regulator for calcium signaling by controlling calcium evoked physiological responses. The elucidation of the interaction between calcium and actin dynamics will be helpful for further investigation of plant cell signaling networks at molecular level. This review mainly focuses on the recent advances in understanding the interaction between the two aforementioned signaling components in two well-established model systems of plant, guard cell, and pollen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Calcium Signaling in Plants)
Open AccessReview Calcium Signals from the Vacuole
Plants 2013, 2(4), 589-614; doi:10.3390/plants2040589
Received: 19 August 2013 / Revised: 21 September 2013 / Accepted: 26 September 2013 / Published: 14 October 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (551 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The vacuole is by far the largest intracellular Ca2+ store in most plant cells. Here, the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of vacuolar Ca2+ release and Ca2+ uptake is summarized, and how different vacuolar Ca2+ channels and Ca
[...] Read more.
The vacuole is by far the largest intracellular Ca2+ store in most plant cells. Here, the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of vacuolar Ca2+ release and Ca2+ uptake is summarized, and how different vacuolar Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ pumps may contribute to Ca2+ signaling in plant cells is discussed. To provide a phylogenetic perspective, the distribution of potential vacuolar Ca2+ transporters is compared for different clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. There are several candidates for vacuolar Ca2+ channels that could elicit cytosolic [Ca2+] transients. Typical second messengers, such as InsP3 and cADPR, seem to trigger vacuolar Ca2+ release, but the molecular mechanism of this Ca2+ release still awaits elucidation. Some vacuolar Ca2+ channels have been identified on a molecular level, the voltage-dependent SV/TPC1 channel, and recently two cyclic-nucleotide-gated cation channels. However, their function in Ca2+ signaling still has to be demonstrated. Ca2+ pumps in addition to establishing long-term Ca2+ homeostasis can shape cytosolic [Ca2+] transients by limiting their amplitude and duration, and may thus affect Ca2+ signaling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Calcium Signaling in Plants)
Open AccessReview Towards the Physics of Calcium Signalling in Plants
Plants 2013, 2(4), 541-588; doi:10.3390/plants2040541
Received: 19 July 2013 / Revised: 17 September 2013 / Accepted: 22 September 2013 / Published: 27 September 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1483 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Calcium is an abundant element with a wide variety of important roles within cells. Calcium ions are inter- and intra-cellular messengers that are involved in numerous signalling pathways. Fluctuating compartment-specific calcium ion concentrations can lead to localised and even plant-wide oscillations that can
[...] Read more.
Calcium is an abundant element with a wide variety of important roles within cells. Calcium ions are inter- and intra-cellular messengers that are involved in numerous signalling pathways. Fluctuating compartment-specific calcium ion concentrations can lead to localised and even plant-wide oscillations that can regulate downstream events. Understanding the mechanisms that give rise to these complex patterns that vary both in space and time can be challenging, even in cases for which individual components have been identified. Taking a systems biology approach, mathematical and computational techniques can be employed to produce models that recapitulate experimental observations and capture our current understanding of the system. Useful models make novel predictions that can be investigated and falsified experimentally. This review brings together recent work on the modelling of calcium signalling in plants, from the scale of ion channels through to plant-wide responses to external stimuli. Some in silico results that have informed later experiments are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Calcium Signaling in Plants)
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Plants Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
plants@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Plants
Back to Top