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Special Issue "Advancements in Nanotoxicology"

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A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2015

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Robert Tanguay
Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-4003, USA
Website: http://emt.oregonstate.edu/roberttanguay
E-Mail: robert.tanguay@oregonstate.edu
Phone: +1 541 737 6514
Fax: +1 541 737 0497
Interests: developmental toxicity; high throughput screening; nanotoxicology; zebrafish; gene expression, miRNAs, and systems toxicology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This issue is a continuation of the previous successful special issue "Nanotoxicology".

Nanomaterial science continues to advance with the generation of more complex nanostructures with exciting potential applications. There have been parallel advances in the biological sciences aimed at evaluating the biocompatibility of these novel nanoparticles. Over recent years, we have realized that evaluating nanoparticles and biological interactions is quite complex because local environmental conditions influences particle behavior, and thus biocompatibility. In order to advance the development of safer high performing products, we need to understand the structural basis for these dynamic behaviors.

In this Special Issue, we are especially interested in manuscripts that advance the understanding of the specific nanomaterials attributes that govern or influence nanomaterial behavior and biocompatibility. This Issue invites manuscripts ranging from understanding dynamic behaviors of particles in aqueous environment, cellular toxicity, whole animal toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, and population scale effects. Manuscripts that define specific biological responses at the organismal, gene expression, proteomic, and genetic levels are also invited.

Prof. Dr. Robert Tanguay
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 600 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • biocompatibility
  • nanotoxicology
  • in vivo
  • in vitro
  • predictive
  • nanotoxicity
  • safety assessment
  • nanoparticle characterization

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (1 paper)

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p. 894-901
by , , , , , ,  and
Nanomaterials 2014, 4(4), 894-901; doi:10.3390/nano4040894
Received: 14 October 2014 / Revised: 3 November 2014 / Accepted: 21 November 2014 / Published: 28 November 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancements in Nanotoxicology)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Article
Title:
Biological Effect of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense in seawaters
Authors:
Fangfang Li, Jiangtao Wang *, Liju Tan
Affilication:
Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100, China; E-Mail: jtwang@ouc.edu.cn
Abstract:
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been used in a variety of industrial areas as a kinds of new nanometer materials. Algal growth test was developed to determine the biological effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense. The results showed that SWNTs stimulated the growth of S. costatum within 72 h and 24 h as theirs concentrations were smaller than 0.5 mg/L and 10 mg/L respectively, While the growth of S. costatum was inhibited within 48 h and 96 h as theirs concentrations were higher than 10 mg/L and 0.5mg/L respectively (p<0.05). The concentrations of chlorophyll were the same as the density of phytoplankton cells. The growth of P. donghaiense was inhibited as SWNTs concentrations were higher than 100 mg/L within 72 h, while SWNTs promoted the growth of P. donghaiense within 48 h after SWNTs were added as their concentrations were smaller than 5 mg/L(p<0.05). The results of chlorophyll were similar to the density of P. donghaiense cells. The roles of SWNTs on the growth of algae were suggested to be associated with the active of some enzymes and the physical properties, such as agglomeration and shading.

Type of Paper: Article
Title:
Comparative Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Toxicity Using Embryonic Zebrafish
Authors:
Leah C. Wehmas1, Catherine Anders2, Jordan Chess2, Alex Punnoose2, Cliff B. Pereira3, Juliet A. Greenwood4 and Robert L. Tanguay1, *
Affilications:
1 Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, 1007 Agriculture & Life Sciences Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
2
Department of Physics and the Interdisciplinary graduate program in Biomolecular Sciences, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725, USA
3
Department of Statistics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
4
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Environmental Health Sciences Center, 2011 Agricultural & Life Sciences Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
Abstract:
Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs) are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of the physicochemical properties contributing to whole-animal nanomaterial toxicity is required. We compared the in vivo toxicity of four widely used semiconductor MO NPs: zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized that the toxicity of these engineered MO NPs would depend on their physicochemical properties. Our experimental results suggest that hydrodynamic size and charge may not be as important as elemental composition and dissolution potential in dictating MO NP toxicity. Only ZnO NP caused significant adverse effects, and only when prepared in pure water (LC50 = 6.39 mg/L). ZnO NP toxicity was life stage dependent. The 24 h toxicity increased greatly (at least 14.7 fold) when zebrafish exposures started at the larval life stage compared to an embryonic exposure. Quantification of ZnO NP dissolution revealed high levels of Zn ion (40-89% of total sample). Exposure to Zn ion equivalents revealed dissolved Zn was the primary cause of toxicity.

Type of Paper: Article
Title:
Removal of Radioactive Cesium Using Prussian Blue Magnetic Nanoparticles
Authors:
Sung-Chan Jang 1,2, Sang-Bum Hong 1, Hee-Man Yang 1, Kune-Woo Lee 1, Jei-Kwon Moon 1, Bum-Kyoung Seo 1,*, Yun Suk Huh 2,* and Changhyun Roh 1,3,*
Affilications:
1 Decontamination and Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 989-111 Daedukdaero Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353, Korea
2
Department of Biological Engineering, Biohybrid Systems Research Center (BSRC), Inha University, Incheon 402-751, Korea
3
Biotechnology Research Division, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI), Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1266, Sinjeong-dong, Jeongeup, Jeonbuk 580-185, Korea
Abstract:
Radioactive cesium (137Cs) has inevitably become a human concern due to exposure from nuclear power plants and nuclear accident releases. Many efforts have been focused on removing cesium and the remediation of the contaminated environment. In this study, we elucidated the ability of Prussian blue-coated magnetic nanoparticles to eliminate cesium from radioactive contaminated waste. Thus, the obtained Prussian blue-coated magnetic nanoparticles were then characterized and examined for their physical and radioactive cesium adsorption properties. This Prussian blue-coated magnetic nanoparticle-based cesium magnetic sorbent can offer great potential for use in in situ remediation.

Type of Paper: Article
Title:
Gene Expression, Protein Function and Pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana Responding to Silver Nanoparticles in Comparison to Silver Ions, Cold, Salt, Drought, and Heat
Author:
Jane Geisler-Lee
Affilication:
Department of Plant Biology, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 1125 Lincoln Drive, MC6509, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA
Abstract:
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), due to their unique physical and chemical properties, have been widely used in different sectors of industry. Their widespread usage has caused environmental concerns. However, the similarity in the toxicity assays and expression analysis between AgNPs and silver ions (Ag+) may have led to the conclusion that both could pose the similar environmental risks to plants. In order to further understand the differences between AgNPs and Ag+, a comprehensive analysis was performed using six sets of Arabidopsis microarray data (AgNPs, Ag+, cold, drought, heat and salt). Up-regulated and down-regulated as well as shared and unique genes were categorized according to stresses. The encoded proteins of these genes were also subjected to protein protein interaction network analysis, and gene ontology (GO) enrichment analyses in Pfam domain, InterPro protein class and KEGG pathway. The stress of AgNPs was more similar to the stresses of Ag+, cold and salt than to heat and drought in Arabidopsis. However, AgNPs stress encompassed three unique features (from the other five stresses): response to fungus (i.e. enriched beta-1,3-endoglucanase domain), anion transport, and cell wall/plasma membrane related. The similarity of AgNPs (abiotic stress) to the response to fungus (biotic stress) suggests physical/mechanical damage due to AgNPs’ nano size. Anion transport implies the differentiation of AgNPs stress from Ag+ and Na+ (from salt) stresses. All the 60 AgNPs-specific genes could be sorted into two categories, protection from oxidative burst and involvement in cell wall and/or plasma membrane. In sum, despite the shared similarity in gene expression and metabolic pathways to the three abiotic stresses (Ag+, cold, salt), AgNPs not only are a new abiotic stressor but also pose different toxicity risks to Arabidopsis plants.
Keywords:
Silver nanotoxicity, silver nanoparticles vs. silver ions, abiotic stresses, expression, protein functions

Type of Paper: Review
Title:
Antitumoral activities of metal oxide nanoparticles
Authors:
M.Pilar Vinardell, H, Llanas and M. Mitjans
Affilication:
Physiology Departament, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitat de Barcelona, 08007 Barcelona, Italy
Abstract:
In recent times, nanoparticles have received much attention for their implication in cancer therapy. Studies have shown that different metal oxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells but not in normal cells obtained from different sources. In some cases this anticancer activity has been demonstrated for the nanoparticle alone or in combination with different therapies, such as photocatalytic therapy or with some anticancer drugs. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been demonstrated to have this activity alone or loaded with an anticancer drug such as doxorubicin. Other nanoparticles showing cytotoxic effects on cancer cells are cobalt oxide, iron oxide, cooper oxide and others. The mechanism of this antitumoral activity could be through the generation of ROS or apoptosis and necrosis among other possible. In the present paper we will review the more significant results obtained with different metal oxide nanoparticles in the context of antitumoral activity.

Last update: 22 January 2015

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