Special Issue "Nanomaterials for SERS Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Yuying Zhang

Physical Chemistry I and Center for Nanointe gration (CENIDE), University Duisburg-Essen, 45141 Essen, Germany
E-Mail
Phone: +49 201 183 6122
Interests: SERS substrates, SERS labels, cancer diagnosis, theranostics
Guest Editor
Dr. Wei Xie

Department of Chemistry, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
E-Mail
Phone: +49 201 183 7347
Interests: Rationally designed plasmonic nanoparticles, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, in situ characterization of reactions on surface

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an ultrasensitive analytical technique for molecular identification and labeling. The central element of SERS is the plasmonic substrate nanomaterials on which Raman signal intensity of analytes can be enhanced by several orders of magnitudes, typically 105–108. The blooming of SERS in the last two decades, therefore, follows the development of nanomaterials, in particular, noble metal nanomaterials, such as gold and silver nanostructures, which provide the required plasmonic activity for SERS enhancement.

The present Special Issue of Nanomaterials is aimed at presenting the current state-of-the-art in the use of nanomaterials for SERS applications. The topics include the design of colloidal and surface-supported nanostructures with plasmonic activity, and their applications in SERS studies including biomedical labeling, imaging, chemical sensing and detection. We have invited contributions from leading groups of the field to present frontier research works in this discipline.

Dr. Yuying Zhang
Dr. Wei Xie
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • metal nanomaterials
  • colloidal and surface-supported nanostructures
  • surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)
  • plasmonic activity
  • biomedical labeling
  • imaging
  • chemical sensing

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Optimizing Melamine Resin Microspheres with Excess Formaldehyde for the SERS Substrate
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(9), 263; doi:10.3390/nano7090263
Received: 9 July 2017 / Revised: 29 August 2017 / Accepted: 1 September 2017 / Published: 6 September 2017
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Abstract
Influence of the excess monomer within the synthetic reaction solution of melamine resin microspheres (MFMSs) on the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enhancement from Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was investigated, where the R6G was adsorbed on the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) that were loaded on the
[...] Read more.
Influence of the excess monomer within the synthetic reaction solution of melamine resin microspheres (MFMSs) on the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enhancement from Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was investigated, where the R6G was adsorbed on the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) that were loaded on the MFMSs. Surface characteristics of the MFMSs were modified by the excess monomer (i.e., the excessive melamine or formaldehyde) through its terminal overreaction, which can be simply controlled by some of the synthetic reaction conditions, thus further allowing us to optimize the assembly of the loaded AgNPs for the SERS detection. These SERS substrates incorporating the optimized MFMSs with the excess formaldehyde can also be used for tracing analyses of more environmental and food contaminants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for SERS Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Hollow Au–Ag Alloy Nanorices and Their Optical Properties
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(9), 255; doi:10.3390/nano7090255
Received: 26 July 2017 / Revised: 29 August 2017 / Accepted: 29 August 2017 / Published: 4 September 2017
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Abstract
Hollow noble metal nanoparticles have excellent performance not only in surface catalysis but also in optics. In this work, the hollow Au–Ag alloy nanorices are fabricated by the galvanic replacement reaction. The dark-field spectrum points out that there is a big difference in
[...] Read more.
Hollow noble metal nanoparticles have excellent performance not only in surface catalysis but also in optics. In this work, the hollow Au–Ag alloy nanorices are fabricated by the galvanic replacement reaction. The dark-field spectrum points out that there is a big difference in the optical properties between the pure Ag nanorices and the hollow alloy nanorices that exhibit highly tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) and that possess larger radiative damping, which is also indicated by the finite element method. Furthermore, the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and oxidation test indicate that hollow Au–Ag alloy nanorices show good anti-oxidation and have broad application prospects in surface-plasmon-related fields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for SERS Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Characterization and Discrimination of Gram-Positive Bacteria Using Raman Spectroscopy with the Aid of Principal Component Analysis
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(9), 248; doi:10.3390/nano7090248
Received: 14 July 2017 / Revised: 27 August 2017 / Accepted: 28 August 2017 / Published: 1 September 2017
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Abstract
Raman scattering and its particular effect, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), are whole-organism fingerprinting spectroscopic techniques that gain more and more popularity in bacterial detection. In this work, two relevant Gram-positive bacteria species, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) and Listeria monocytogenes (L.
[...] Read more.
Raman scattering and its particular effect, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), are whole-organism fingerprinting spectroscopic techniques that gain more and more popularity in bacterial detection. In this work, two relevant Gram-positive bacteria species, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) and Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) were characterized based on their Raman and SERS spectral fingerprints. The SERS spectra were used to identify the biochemical structures of the bacterial cell wall. Two synthesis methods of the SERS-active nanomaterials were used and the recorded spectra were analyzed. L. casei and L. monocytogenes were successfully discriminated by applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to their specific spectral data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for SERS Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Charge Transfer Effect on Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Furfural Molecules
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(8), 210; doi:10.3390/nano7080210
Received: 20 June 2017 / Revised: 19 July 2017 / Accepted: 21 July 2017 / Published: 2 August 2017
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Abstract
The detection of furfural in transformer oil through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is one of the most promising online monitoring techniques in the process of transformer aging. In this work, the Raman of individual furfural molecules and SERS of furfural-Mx (M
[...] Read more.
The detection of furfural in transformer oil through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is one of the most promising online monitoring techniques in the process of transformer aging. In this work, the Raman of individual furfural molecules and SERS of furfural-Mx (M = Ag, Au, Cu) complexes are investigated through density functional theory (DFT). In the Raman spectrum of individual furfural molecules, the vibration mode of each Raman peak is figured out, and the deviation from experimental data is analyzed by surface charge distribution. In the SERS of furfural-Mx complexes, the influence of atom number and species on SERS chemical enhancement factors (EFs) are studied, and are further analyzed by charge transfer effect. Our studies strengthen the understanding of charge transfer effect in the SERS of furfural molecules, which is important in the online monitoring of the transformer aging process through SERS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for SERS Applications)
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Open AccessCommunication A Simple and Highly Sensitive Thymine Sensor for Mercury Ion Detection Based on Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and the Mechanism Study
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(7), 192; doi:10.3390/nano7070192
Received: 19 June 2017 / Revised: 10 July 2017 / Accepted: 18 July 2017 / Published: 24 July 2017
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Abstract
Mercury ion (Hg2+) is recognized as one of the most toxic metal ions for the environment and for human health. Techniques utilized in the detection of Hg2+ are an important factor. Herein, a simple thymine was successfully employed as the
[...] Read more.
Mercury ion (Hg2+) is recognized as one of the most toxic metal ions for the environment and for human health. Techniques utilized in the detection of Hg2+ are an important factor. Herein, a simple thymine was successfully employed as the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy sensor for Hg2+ ion detection. The limit of detection (LOD) of the developed sensor is better than 0.1 nM (0.02 ppb). This sensor can also selectively distinguish Hg2+ ions over 7 types of alkali, heavy metal and transition-metal ions. Moreover, the LOD of the sensor can even achieve 1 ppb in practical application in the nature system, which is half the maximum allowable level (10 nM, 2 ppb) stipulated in the US Environmental Protection Agency standard. Further investigation of the thymine-Hg2+-thymine coordination mechanism provides a possible means of detecting other metal ions by replacing the metal ion-specific ligands. This work paves the way for the detection of toxic metal ions and environmental problems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for SERS Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Controllable Charge Transfer in Ag-TiO2 Composite Structure for SERS Application
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(7), 159; doi:10.3390/nano7070159
Received: 3 May 2017 / Revised: 1 June 2017 / Accepted: 16 June 2017 / Published: 28 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3077 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The nanocaps array of TiO2/Ag bilayer with different Ag thicknesses and co-sputtering TiO2-Ag monolayer with different TiO2 contents were fabricated on a two-dimensional colloidal array substrate for the investigation of Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties. For the
[...] Read more.
The nanocaps array of TiO2/Ag bilayer with different Ag thicknesses and co-sputtering TiO2-Ag monolayer with different TiO2 contents were fabricated on a two-dimensional colloidal array substrate for the investigation of Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties. For the TiO2/Ag bilayer, when the Ag thickness increased, SERS intensity decreased. Meanwhile, a significant enhancement was observed when the sublayer Ag was 10 nm compared to the pure Ag monolayer, which was ascribed to the metal-semiconductor synergistic effect that electromagnetic mechanism (EM) provided by roughness surface and charge-transfer (CT) enhancement mechanism from TiO2-Ag composite components. In comparison to the TiO2/Ag bilayer, the co-sputtered TiO2-Ag monolayer decreased the aggregation of Ag particles and led to the formation of small Ag particles, which showed that TiO2 could effectively inhibit the aggregation and growth of Ag nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for SERS Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Highly Sensitive Magnetic-SERS Dual-Function Silica Nanoprobes for Effective On-Site Organic Chemical Detection
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(6), 146; doi:10.3390/nano7060146
Received: 13 May 2017 / Revised: 7 June 2017 / Accepted: 9 June 2017 / Published: 13 June 2017
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Abstract
We report magnetic silver nanoshells (M-AgNSs) that have both magnetic and SERS properties for SERS-based detection. The M-AgNSs are composed of hundreds of Fe3O4 nanoparticles for rapid accumulation and bumpy silver shell for sensitive SERS detection by near-infrared laser excitation.
[...] Read more.
We report magnetic silver nanoshells (M-AgNSs) that have both magnetic and SERS properties for SERS-based detection. The M-AgNSs are composed of hundreds of Fe3O4 nanoparticles for rapid accumulation and bumpy silver shell for sensitive SERS detection by near-infrared laser excitation. The intensity of the SERS signal from the M-AgNSs was strong enough to provide single particle-level detection. We obtained much stronger SERS signal intensity from the aggregated M-AgNSs than from the non-aggregated AgNSs. 4-Fluorothiophenol was detected at concentrations as low as 1 nM, which corresponds to 0.16 ppb. The limit of detection for tetramethylthiuram disulfide was 10 μM, which corresponds to 3 ppm. The M-AgNSs can be used to detect trace amounts of organic molecules using a portable Raman system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for SERS Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Melanin-Associated Synthesis of SERS-Active Nanostructures and the Application for Monitoring of Intracellular Melanogenesis
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(3), 70; doi:10.3390/nano7030070
Received: 23 December 2016 / Revised: 11 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 20 March 2017
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Abstract
Melanin plays an indispensable role in the human body. It serves as a biological reducer for the green synthesis of precious metal nanoparticles. Melanin–Ag nanocomposites were successfully produced which exhibited very strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect because of the reducibility property of
[...] Read more.
Melanin plays an indispensable role in the human body. It serves as a biological reducer for the green synthesis of precious metal nanoparticles. Melanin–Ag nanocomposites were successfully produced which exhibited very strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect because of the reducibility property of melanin. A melanin–Ag composite structure was synthesized in situ in melanin cells, and SERS technique was performed for the rapid imaging and quantitative assay of intracellular melanin. This imaging technique was also used to successfully trace the formation and secretion of intracellular melanin after stimulation with melanin-stimulating hormones. Based on the self-reducing property of melanin, the proposed SERS imaging method can provide potentially powerful analytical detection tools to study the biological functions of melanin and to prevent and cure melanin-related diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for SERS Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Review of SERS Substrates for Chemical Sensing
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(6), 142; doi:10.3390/nano7060142
Received: 16 May 2017 / Revised: 2 June 2017 / Accepted: 6 June 2017 / Published: 8 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5872 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The SERS effect was initially discovered in the 1970s. Early research focused on understanding the phenomenon and increasing enhancement to achieve single molecule detection. From the mid-1980s to early 1990s, research started to move away from obtaining a fundamental understanding of the phenomenon
[...] Read more.
The SERS effect was initially discovered in the 1970s. Early research focused on understanding the phenomenon and increasing enhancement to achieve single molecule detection. From the mid-1980s to early 1990s, research started to move away from obtaining a fundamental understanding of the phenomenon to the exploration of analytical applications. At the same time, significant developments occurred in the field of photonics that led to the advent of inexpensive, robust, compact, field-deployable Raman systems. The 1990s also saw rapid development in nanoscience. This convergence of technologies (photonics and nanoscience) has led to accelerated development of SERS substrates to detect a wide range of chemical and biological analytes. It would be a monumental task to discuss all the different kinds of SERS substrates that have been explored. Likewise, it would be impossible to discuss the use of SERS for both chemical and biological detection. Instead, a review of the most common metallic (Ag, Cu, and Au) SERS substrates for chemical detection only is discussed, as well as SERS substrates that are commercially available. Other issues with SERS for chemical detection have been selectivity, reversibility, and reusability of the substrates. How these issues have been addressed is also discussed in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for SERS Applications)
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