Special Issue "Virtual Reality and Games"

A special issue of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Carolina Cruz-Neira

University of Louisiana at Lafayette ,104 E University Ave, Lafayette, LA 70504, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: virtual reality; interaction; emerging technologies; multidisciplinary research
Guest Editor
Prof. Marcos Fernández Marín

University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: computer graphics; simulation; augmented reality; virtual reality; multimodal interfaces; human computer interaction
Guest Editor
Dr. Cristina Portalés Ricart

Institute of Robotics and Information and Communication Technologies (IRTIC), Universitat de València, Av. de Blasco Ibáñez, 13, València 46010, Spain
Website1 | Website2 | E-Mail
Interests: computer vision; HCI; augmented reality; multispectral imaging; 3D reconstruction; multimodal data acquisition and rendering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent developments in motion sensors, graphics, multimodal display technologies and interaction have paved the way for expanding the Virtual Reality (VR) gaming possibilities beyond traditional entertainment, providing seamless immersive experiences in highly interactive synthetic worlds. From active adventures to relaxing, passive immersion, VR evolves beyond the related technologies to take the user(s) into the heart of the story itself, perceiving it as in first person. The magic of VR makes serious games such as those involving education and training an engaging adventure, providing learning skills to improve users’ expertise. Industries related to real state, automobile, advertising or tourism are currently using VR gaming as a claim to attract new audiences or involve clients in new engaging experiences. As well, media artists, filmmakers, musicians and designers find in VR gaming an inspiring resource for their creations.

From a research point of view, there are many aspects that should be addressed. For instance, considering the variety of new sensors and displays technologies dealing with different kind of stimuli, issues regarding the level of immersion may arise. Also, what could be the optimal combination of these technologies depending on the kind of simulated VR and the proposed games? User-related studies, such as the level of engagement, satisfaction, learning or skills improvement needs also to be investigated.

This Special Issue aims to provide a collection of high quality research articles that address broad challenges in both theoretical and applied aspects of VR and games, including new software and hardware developments and user-related studies. We also aim to assess old questions in the new VR-gaming realm.

Prof. Carolina Cruz-Neira
Prof. Marcos Fernández Marín
Dr. Cristina Portalés Ricart
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Animation
  • Interactive technologies
  • Computer graphics
  • Virtual environments
  • Gamification
  • User-related studies
  • Pervasive gaming
  • Visualisation techniques
  • Mobile games
  • Education and learning

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Exploration of the 3D World on the Internet Using Commodity Virtual Reality Devices
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2017, 1(3), 15; doi:10.3390/mti1030015
Received: 27 April 2017 / Revised: 12 July 2017 / Accepted: 17 July 2017 / Published: 21 July 2017
PDF Full-text (6051 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article describes technical basics and applications of graphically interactive and online Virtual Reality (VR) frameworks. It automatically extracts and displays left and right stereo images from the Internet search engines, e.g., Google Image Search. Within a short waiting time, many 3D related
[...] Read more.
This article describes technical basics and applications of graphically interactive and online Virtual Reality (VR) frameworks. It automatically extracts and displays left and right stereo images from the Internet search engines, e.g., Google Image Search. Within a short waiting time, many 3D related results are returned to the users regarding aligned left and right stereo photos; these results are viewable through VR glasses. The system automatically filters different types of available 3D data from redundant pictorial datasets on the public networks (the Internet). To reduce possible copyright issues, only the search for images that are “labelled for reuse” is performed; meaning that the obtained pictures can be used for any purpose, in any area, without being modified. The system then automatically specifies if the picture is a side-by-side stereo pair, an anaglyph, a stereogram, or just a “normal” 2D image (not optically 3D viewable). The system then generates a stereo pair from the collected dataset, to seamlessly display 3D visualisation on State-of-the-art VR devices such as the low-cost Google Cardboard, Samsung Gear VR or Google Daydream. These devices are used to provide an immediate, controllable 3D display. In this article, we propose an image type classification technique that dynamically extracts co-aligned stereo pairs with rich 3D visualisation to VR viewers. This system is portable, simple to set up and operate. From some initial experiment results; our system is shown to be relatively fast, accurate, and easy to implement. With such system, Internet users all over theWorld could easily visualise millions of real life stereo datasets publicly available on the Internet; which are believed to be useful for VR testing and learning purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virtual Reality and Games)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle On the Design of Virtual Reality Learning Environments in Engineering
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2017, 1(2), 11; doi:10.3390/mti1020011
Received: 15 April 2017 / Revised: 14 May 2017 / Accepted: 24 May 2017 / Published: 1 June 2017
PDF Full-text (7103 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Currently, the use of virtual reality (VR) is being widely applied in different fields, especially in computer science, engineering, and medicine. Concretely, the engineering applications based on VR cover approximately one half of the total number of VR resources (considering the research works
[...] Read more.
Currently, the use of virtual reality (VR) is being widely applied in different fields, especially in computer science, engineering, and medicine. Concretely, the engineering applications based on VR cover approximately one half of the total number of VR resources (considering the research works published up to last year, 2016). In this paper, the capabilities of different computational software for designing VR applications in engineering education are discussed. As a result, a general flowchart is proposed as a guide for designing VR resources in any application. It is worth highlighting that, rather than this study being based on the applications used in the engineering field, the obtained results can be easily extrapolated to other knowledge areas without any loss of generality. This way, this paper can serve as a guide for creating a VR application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virtual Reality and Games)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle On a First Evaluation of ROMOT—A RObotic 3D MOvie Theatre—For Driving Safety Awareness
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2017, 1(2), 6; doi:10.3390/mti1020006
Received: 13 February 2017 / Revised: 15 March 2017 / Accepted: 23 March 2017 / Published: 27 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (8662 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we introduce ROMOT, a RObotic 3D-MOvie Theatre, and present a case study related to driving safety. ROMOT is built with a robotic motion platform, includes multimodal devices, and supports audience-film interaction. We show the versatility of the system by means
[...] Read more.
In this paper, we introduce ROMOT, a RObotic 3D-MOvie Theatre, and present a case study related to driving safety. ROMOT is built with a robotic motion platform, includes multimodal devices, and supports audience-film interaction. We show the versatility of the system by means of different types of system setups and generated content that includes a first-person movie and others involving the technologies of virtual, augmented, and mixed realities. Finally, we present the results of some preliminary user tests made at the laboratory level, including the system usability scale. They give satisfactory scores for the usability of the system and the individual’s satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virtual Reality and Games)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Augmented Reality Video Games: New Possibilities and Implications for Children and Adolescents
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2017, 1(2), 8; doi:10.3390/mti1020008
Received: 17 February 2017 / Revised: 17 April 2017 / Accepted: 19 April 2017 / Published: 22 April 2017
PDF Full-text (213 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years, the video game market has embraced augmented reality video games, a class of video games that is set to grow as gaming technologies develop. Given the widespread use of video games among children and adolescents, the health implications of augmented
[...] Read more.
In recent years, the video game market has embraced augmented reality video games, a class of video games that is set to grow as gaming technologies develop. Given the widespread use of video games among children and adolescents, the health implications of augmented reality technology must be closely examined. Augmented reality technology shows a potential for the promotion of healthy behaviors and social interaction among children. However, the full immersion and physical movement required in augmented reality video games may also put users at risk for physical and mental harm. Our review article and commentary emphasizes both the benefits and dangers of augmented reality video games for children and adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virtual Reality and Games)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Health Implications of Augmented Reality Video Games for Young Teens and Children
Author: Ruth L. Milanaik
Abstract: In recent years the video game market has embraced augmented reality video games, (ARG) a class of video games that is set to grow as VR technology develops. Given the widespread use of video games among children and adolescents, the health implications of ARG games must be closely examined. ARG games show potential for health promotion and social interaction, as research has shown that playing exergames results in energy expenditure levels comparable to moderate to rigorous exercise and may provide a subject bridge for like minded children. However, the full immersion and physical movement required in ARG games may also put users at risk for physical and mental harm. Our short review article and commentary will emphasis both the benefits and dangers of ARG for adolescents and children.

Title: Any "Body" There? : Virtual Body and Virtual Reality Games
Author: Jean-Luc Lugrin
Abstract: This paper investigates the role of virtual body within virtual reality (VR) games. The majority of VR games are relying on a partial digital representation of the user (aka Avatar). Players are often just represented by floating virtual hands and head which are replicating their movements in the virtual word. The necessity of having a full body avatar, and its impact on the player's experience and performance, is still an open question. Previous work on avatar embodiment suggest that using VR to fully substitute a person’s body with a virtual one is significantly influencing user's self-image, behaviour, state of mind and emotional response. Therefore, we developed and evaluated a VR game named \emph{IGod}, supporting different levels of avatar body completeness. Our preliminary results suggest that a full virtual body significantly increases of players' enjoyment, movement, engagement, and immersion as well as their sense of ownership and agency over their virtual actions.

keywords: Virtual Reality, Games, Avatar Embodiment, Experience

 

Title: Procedural Content Generation for Virtual Worlds – A Survey

Author: Jonas Freiknecht, Wolfgang Effelsberg

Abstract: This survey presents algorithms for the automatic generation of content for virtual worlds, in particular for games. After a definition of the term Procedural Content Generation the algorithms to generate realistic objects such as terrains, plants, buildings, road networks and avatars are introduced in detail. In our discussion we emphasize a good compromise between the realism of the objects and the performance of the algorithms. The survey also assesses each generated object type in terms of its applicability in games and simulations of virtual worlds.

 

 

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
MTI Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to MTI Edit a special issue Review for MTI
logo
loading...
Back to Top