E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Bioactive Molecules and Their Mechanisms of Action"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Atanas G. Atanasov

1. Institute of Genetics and Animal Breeding of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 05-552 Jastrzebiec, Poland
2. Department of Pharmacognosy, University of Vienna, Austria
3. International Natural Product Sciences Taskforce (INPST)
Website | E-Mail
Interests: molecular medicine; nutrigenomics; natural products; biotechnology; molecular pharmacology
Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Karel Šmejkal

Department of Natural Drugs, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Czech Republic
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural products; phytochemistry; inflammation; antibacterial activity
Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Elke Heiss

Department of Pharmacognosy, University of Vienna, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural products; mode of action; cellular stress response; bioenergetics, metabolic and redox homeostasis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Prompted by the strong academic and public interest in our previously-edited Special Issue for Molecules, focused on the topic "Effects of Natural Products in the Context of Cardiometabolic Disease", we will release another Special Issue. For this new issue, entitled "Bioactive Molecules and Their Mechanisms of Action", we strongly encourage the submission of works examining the mode of action of natural products in models of cardiovascular or metabolic diseases, but also extend the scope to include submissions that are related to the mechanistic characterization of compounds other than natural products, or to bioactivities beyond the cardiometabolic field, including but not limited to effects on inflammation, advanced antioxidant activity studies, or effects on gut microbiota.

Prof. Dr. Atanas G. Atanasov
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Karel Šmejkal
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Elke Heiss
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive compounds
  • small molecules
  • natural products
  • mechanisms of pharmacologic action
  • drug discovery
  • pharmacology
  • metabolism
  • inflammation

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Tetrahydroxystilbene Glucoside Regulates Proliferation, Differentiation, and OPG/RANKL/M-CSF Expression in MC3T3-E1 Cells via the PI3K/Akt Pathway
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2306; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092306
Received: 30 July 2018 / Revised: 31 August 2018 / Accepted: 6 September 2018 / Published: 10 September 2018
PDF Full-text (4101 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside (TSG) is a unique component of the bone-reinforcing herb Radix Polygoni Multiflori Preparata (RPMP). It has the ability to promote bone formation and protect osteoblasts. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To better understand its biological function, we determined TSG’s effect
[...] Read more.
Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside (TSG) is a unique component of the bone-reinforcing herb Radix Polygoni Multiflori Preparata (RPMP). It has the ability to promote bone formation and protect osteoblasts. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To better understand its biological function, we determined TSG’s effect on murine pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells by the MTT assay, flow cytometry, FQ-PCR, Western blot, and ELISA. The results showed that TSG caused an elevation of the MC3T3-E1 cell number, the number of cells in the S phase, and the mRNA levels of the runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2), osterix (Osx), and collagen type I α1 (Col1a1). In addition, the osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA level was up-regulated, while the nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) mRNA levels were down-regulated by TSG. Furthermore, TSG activated the phosphoinosmde-3-kinase/protein kinase B (also known as PI3K/Akt) pathway, and blocking this pathway by the inhibitor LY-294002 could impair TSG’s functions in relation to the MC3T3-E1 cells. In conclusion, TSG could activate the PI3K/Akt pathway and thus promote MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and differentiation, and influence OPG/RANKL/M-CSF expression. TSG merits further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for osteoporosis treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Molecules and Their Mechanisms of Action)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Pseudopterosin Inhibits Proliferation and 3D Invasion in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer by Agonizing Glucocorticoid Receptor Alpha
Molecules 2018, 23(8), 1992; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23081992
Received: 12 July 2018 / Revised: 7 August 2018 / Accepted: 8 August 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
PDF Full-text (4481 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Pseudopterosin, produced by the sea whip of the genus Antillogorgia, possesses a variety of promising biological activities, including potent anti-inflammatory effects. However, few studies examined pseudopterosin in the treatment of cancer cells and, to our knowledge, the ability to inhibit triple-negative breast
[...] Read more.
Pseudopterosin, produced by the sea whip of the genus Antillogorgia, possesses a variety of promising biological activities, including potent anti-inflammatory effects. However, few studies examined pseudopterosin in the treatment of cancer cells and, to our knowledge, the ability to inhibit triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) proliferation or invasion has not been explored. Thus, we evaluated the as-yet unknown mechanism of action of pseudopterosin: Pseudopterosin was able to inhibit proliferation of TNBC. Interestingly, analyzing breast cancer cell proliferation after knocking down glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) revealed that the antiproliferative effects of pseudopterosin were significantly inhibited when GRα expression was reduced. Furthermore, pseudopterosin inhibited the invasion of MDA-MB-231 3D tumor spheroids embedded in an extracellular-like matrix. Remarkably, the knockdown of GRα in 3D tumor spheroids revealed increased ability of cells to invade the surrounding matrix. In a coculture, encompassing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and MDA-MB-231 cells, and the production of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) significantly increased compared to a monoculture. Notably, pseudopterosin indicated to block cytokine elevation, representing key players in tumor progression in the coculture. Thus, our results reveal pseudopterosin treatment as a potential novel approach in TNBC therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Molecules and Their Mechanisms of Action)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top