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Special Issue "Light-Harvesting Complexes"

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A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Theoretical Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Pall Thordarson (Website)

School of Chemistry, The University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 Australia
Phone: +621293854478
Fax: +61 2 9385 6141
Interests: nanomedicine (self-assembled gels for drug release, cancer cell targeting peptides, gels as 3D cell culture mimicking, AFM as a tool in drug discovery); biophysical and protein chemistry (light-activiated bioconjugates, proteins and polymer self-assembly, controlling protein self-assembly); supramolecular chemistry (supramolecular chemistry of peptides and proteins in water, non-linear interactons in supramolecular chemistry, the formation of self-assembled gels, bio-mimetic light-harvesting and donor-acceptor arrays, binding constants and statistical treatment of supramolecular binding data)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Light-harvesting, the capture, storage and concentration of photon energy, is the first step in photosynthesis as light energy is converted to chemical energy. This incredibly efficient process is carried out by a fascinating array of proteins and chromophores in nature. The structural and photophysical properties of these systems provide a rich source of important challenges for chemistry researchers. The synthesis of artificial light-harvesting complexes is of particular note in this context because synthetic bio-mimetic light-harvesting complexes have and will continue to help us understand how their natural counterparts work. Additionally, synthetic light-harvesting complexes could be used to form novel solar concentrators to enhance the cost-efficiency of current and future generations of solar cells and other photovoltaic devices. The special issue invites submission in any area related to light-harvesting complexes, ranging from, but not limited to, biophysical and photophysical investigations into light-harvesting in nature to reports on synthetic organic and inorganic light-harvesting complexes in one-, two- or three-dimensions formed by covalent or non-covalent chemistry.

Prof. Pall Thordarson
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • light-harvesting
  • biomimetics
  • chromophores
  • energy transfer
  • donor-acceptor systems

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Synthesis and Photoluminescent Properties of Geometrically Hindered cis-Tris(diphenylaminofluorene) as Precursors to Light-Emitting Devices
Molecules 2015, 20(3), 4635-4654; doi:10.3390/molecules20034635
Received: 12 January 2015 / Revised: 4 March 2015 / Accepted: 4 March 2015 / Published: 13 March 2015
PDF Full-text (3111 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A novel highly luminescent tris-fluorenyl ring-interconnected chromophore tris(DPAF-C9) was synthesized using a C3 symmetrical triaminobenzene core as the synthon. This structure bears three light-harvesting 2-diphenylamino-9,9-dialkylfluorenyl (DPAF) ring moieties with each attached by two branched 3',5',5'-trimethylhexyl (C9) arms. [...] Read more.
A novel highly luminescent tris-fluorenyl ring-interconnected chromophore tris(DPAF-C9) was synthesized using a C3 symmetrical triaminobenzene core as the synthon. This structure bears three light-harvesting 2-diphenylamino-9,9-dialkylfluorenyl (DPAF) ring moieties with each attached by two branched 3',5',5'-trimethylhexyl (C9) arms. A major stereoisomer was chromatographically isolated and characterized to possess a 3D structural configuration of cis-conformer in a cup-form. Molecular calculation at B3LYP/6-31G* level revealed the unexpected stability of this cis-cup-conformer of tris(DPAF-C9) better than that of the stereoisomer in a propeller-form and the trans-conformer. The structural geometry is proposed to be capable of minimizing the aggregation related self-quenching effect in the condensed phase. Fluorescence emission wavelength of tris(DPAF-C9) was found to be in a close range to that of PVK that led to its potential uses as the secondary blue hole-transporting material for enhancing the device property toward the modulation of PLED performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light-Harvesting Complexes)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Optimal Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems
Molecules 2015, 20(8), 15224-15272; doi:10.3390/molecules200815224
Received: 22 June 2015 / Revised: 3 August 2015 / Accepted: 14 August 2015 / Published: 20 August 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (4102 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this [...] Read more.
Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this work, we review the principles of optimal energy transfer in various natural and artificial light harvesting systems. We begin by presenting the guiding principles for optimizing the energy transfer efficiency in systems connected to dissipative environments, with particular attention paid to the potential role of quantum coherence in light harvesting systems. We will comment briefly on photo-protective mechanisms in natural systems that ensure optimal functionality under varying ambient conditions. For completeness, we will also present an overview of the charge separation and electron transfer pathways in reaction centers. Finally, recent theoretical and experimental progress on excitation energy transfer, charge separation, and charge transport in artificial light harvesting systems is delineated, with organic solar cells taken as prime examples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light-Harvesting Complexes)
Open AccessReview Light-Induced Infrared Difference Spectroscopy in the Investigation of Light Harvesting Complexes
Molecules 2015, 20(7), 12229-12249; doi:10.3390/molecules200712229
Received: 4 May 2015 / Revised: 16 June 2015 / Accepted: 17 June 2015 / Published: 3 July 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1659 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Light-induced infrared difference spectroscopy (IR-DS) has been used, especially in the last decade, to investigate early photophysics, energy transfer and photoprotection mechanisms in isolated and membrane-bound light harvesting complexes (LHCs). The technique has the definite advantage to give information on how the [...] Read more.
Light-induced infrared difference spectroscopy (IR-DS) has been used, especially in the last decade, to investigate early photophysics, energy transfer and photoprotection mechanisms in isolated and membrane-bound light harvesting complexes (LHCs). The technique has the definite advantage to give information on how the pigments and the other constituents of the biological system (proteins, membranes, etc.) evolve during a given photoreaction. Different static and time-resolved approaches have been used. Compared to the application of IR-DS to photosynthetic Reaction Centers (RCs), however, IR-DS applied to LHCs is still in an almost pioneering age: very often sophisticated techniques (step-scan FTIR, ultrafast IR) or data analysis strategies (global analysis, target analysis, multivariate curve resolution) are needed. In addition, band assignment is usually more complicated than in RCs. The results obtained on the studied systems (chromatophores and RC-LHC supercomplexes from purple bacteria; Peridinin-Chlorophyll-a-Proteins from dinoflagellates; isolated LHCII from plants; thylakoids; Orange Carotenoid Protein from cyanobacteria) are summarized. A description of the different IR-DS techniques used is also provided, and the most stimulating perspectives are also described. Especially if used synergically with other biophysical techniques, light-induced IR-DS represents an important tool in the investigation of photophysical/photochemical reactions in LHCs and LHC-containing systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light-Harvesting Complexes)

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