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Special Issue "Functional Molecular Materials"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 March 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Shiqiang Bai

Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, #08-03, Innovis, Singapore 138634, Republic of Singapore
Website | E-Mail
Interests: organic–inorganic hybrid materials; functional molecular materials
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. David James Young

Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore DC, Queensland 4558, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: molecular materials
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. T. S. Andy Hor

The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: organometallics; homogeneous catalysis; molecular materials; heterometallic; hybrid ligands

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Molecules is pleased to announce a Special Issue on “Functional Molecular Materials”. Molecular materials are defined as those with well-defined structures at the molecule level. Typical examples are coordination polymers, metal–organic frameworks, polymers and polymer composites. These materials have broad applications, including molecular magnetism, luminescence, catalysis, energy harvest or conversion, and biological applications. The aim of this Special Issue is to summarize and demonstrate recent advances in molecular materials, and to build a network of researchers in this area.

This Special Issue welcomes submission of previously unpublished manuscripts (original researches or reviews) detailing investigations of the structures and functions of molecular materials. Examples of these studies may include:

  • The self-assembly of well-defined functional coordination polymers and metal-organic frameworks
  • Organic-inorganic superlattice structures and applications
  • Functional molecule-polymer composites with stimuli responsiveness
  • Functionalized composites for catalysis and energy conversion
  • Chiral, magnetic, catalytic, luminescent, electrically conductive, and thermoelectric molecular materials.

We plan to receive submissions from November 2017 to March 2018. Manuscripts will be published on an ongoing basis after being processed.

Dr. Shiqiang Bai
Prof. Dr. David James Young
Prof. Dr. T. S. Andy Hor
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Molecular Materials
  • Coordination polymers
  • Metal-organic frameworks
  • Hydrogels
  • Polymers
  • Hybrid materials
  • Energy conversion
  • Energy harvesting

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Relationship between the Polymeric Ionization Degree and Powder and Surface Properties in Materials Derived from Poly(maleic anhydride-alt-octadecene)
Molecules 2018, 23(2), 320; doi:10.3390/molecules23020320
Received: 18 December 2017 / Revised: 17 January 2018 / Accepted: 1 February 2018 / Published: 2 February 2018
PDF Full-text (2957 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polymeric materials derived from poly(maleic anhydride-alt-octadecene)—here referred as PAM-18—have shown interesting properties that make them potential pharmaceutical excipients. In this work, eight polymers derived from PAM-18 were obtained using NaOH and KOH at 1:1; 1:0.75, 1:0.5, and 1:0.25 molar ratios. The
[...] Read more.
Polymeric materials derived from poly(maleic anhydride-alt-octadecene)—here referred as PAM-18—have shown interesting properties that make them potential pharmaceutical excipients. In this work, eight polymers derived from PAM-18 were obtained using NaOH and KOH at 1:1; 1:0.75, 1:0.5, and 1:0.25 molar ratios. The resulting products were labeled as PAM-18Na and PAM-18K, respectively. Each polymer was purified by ultrafiltration/lyophilization, and the ionization degree was determined by potentiometric studies, which was related to the zeta potential. The structural characterization was performed using the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) espectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The physical characterization was carried out by SEM, particle analysis, and humidity loss and gain studies; the surface studies were performed by the sessile drop method. PAM-18Na had ionization degrees of 95%, 63%, 39% and 22%, whereas those for PAM-18K were 99%, 52%, 35% and 20%, respectively. The results also showed that for higher inorganic base amounts used, the polymeric materials obtained possess high ionization degrees, which could form polymeric solutions or hetero-dispersed systems. Likewise, it was observed that for higher proportions of carboxylate groups in the polymeric structure, the capability to retain water is increased and, only can be eliminated by drying at temperatures greater than 160 °C. On the other hand, the modification of PAM-18 to its ionized forms led to the formation of powder materials with low flowability and surfaces that ranged from very hydrophobic to slightly wettable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Molecular Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Nano/Mesoporous Carbon from Rice Starch for Voltammetric Detection of Ascorbic Acid
Molecules 2018, 23(2), 234; doi:10.3390/molecules23020234
Received: 7 December 2017 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 24 January 2018 / Published: 25 January 2018
PDF Full-text (1893 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Rice starch (RS-)based nano/mesoporous carbon (RSNMC) was prepared via a hard-templating route using cheap rice starch as a carbon source. XRD and TEM characterization indicated the formation of organized nanoporous RSNMC. Nitrogen absorption–desorption studies revealed a high surface area of up to 488
[...] Read more.
Rice starch (RS-)based nano/mesoporous carbon (RSNMC) was prepared via a hard-templating route using cheap rice starch as a carbon source. XRD and TEM characterization indicated the formation of organized nanoporous RSNMC. Nitrogen absorption–desorption studies revealed a high surface area of up to 488 m2∙g−1, uniform pore size of 3.92 nm, and pore volume of 1.14 cm3∙g−1. A RSNMC-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was employed for the determination of ascorbic acid (AA) and exhibited a linear response in the concentration range of 0.005–6.0 mM with a detection limit of 0.003 mM. These results demonstrate that RSNMC has potential as an advanced and cheap electrode material for electrochemical sensing and other electrocatalytic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Molecular Materials)
Figures

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