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Special Issue "The Antioxidant Capacities of Natural Products 2019"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Susana M. Cardoso

QOPNA &Department of Chemistry, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: phenolic compounds; structural analysis; antioxidant activity; food chemistry; food analysis; nutritional value; functional foods
Guest Editor
Dr. Alessia Fazio

Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, Rende , Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39 0984493013
Interests: food matrices of plant origin, antioxidant capacities, antiproliferative activity, anti-inflammatory properties, glucans, pectins, seed oils, citrus essential oils, fatty acids, biopolymer synthesis, active packaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antioxidants play an important role in the defense network by inhibiting the free radical-mediated oxidation of lipids, proteins, sugars, and also DNA. Their activity is of significance both in foods, for the prevention of oxidation and prolongation of shelf-life, and in the body, for dealing with oxidative stress, which is involved in the pathogenesis of various diseases, such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, and in aging. Natural compounds with free radical-scavenging capacity contained in plants, fruits, and vegetables have received much attention and are being extensively used as antioxidants in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical fields to replace synthetic antioxidants, whose use is often restricted because of their carcinogenic effects. The search for new natural compounds with antioxidant activities is a growing research area.

The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight the recent advances on antioxidant natural compounds. This Special Issue may include original research articles and reviews on new extraction procedures; isolation, purification, and characterization of new compounds; in vitro and in vivo studies on the antioxidant properties of extracts, fractions, synergistic mixtures, and isolated compounds and their possible employment to treat human diseases. Studies dealing with new formulations containing antioxidants (including polymers for active packaging) are also welcome.

Dr. Susana M. Cardoso
Dr. Alessia Fazio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • New antioxidant natural compounds
  • Extraction, isolation, and characterization of natural antioxidants
  • Mechanism of action of antioxidant natural compounds
  • Synergistic activity of natural compounds
  • Strategies combining natural compounds and conventional therapeutic approaches
  • Pharmacological evidence (in vitro, in vivo) related to antioxidant activities
  • Antioxidant activities and inflammation-related disorders
  • New formulations containing antioxidants

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Effects of Cold Saponification on the Unsaponified Fatty Acid Composition and Sensory Perception of Commercial Natural Herbal Soaps
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2356; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092356
Received: 21 August 2018 / Revised: 7 September 2018 / Accepted: 12 September 2018 / Published: 14 September 2018
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Abstract
Saponification is the process in which triglycerides are combined with a strong base to form fatty acid metal salts during the soap-making process. The distribution of unsaturated and saturated fatty acid determines the hardness, aroma, cleansing, lather, and moisturizing abilities of soaps. Plant
[...] Read more.
Saponification is the process in which triglycerides are combined with a strong base to form fatty acid metal salts during the soap-making process. The distribution of unsaturated and saturated fatty acid determines the hardness, aroma, cleansing, lather, and moisturizing abilities of soaps. Plant extracts, such as rosemary, vegetable, and essential oils are frequently added to soaps to enhance quality and sensory appeal. Three natural soaps were formulated using cold saponification to produce a base or control bar (BB), hibiscus rosehip bar (H), and a forest grove bar (FG). Rosemary extract (R) or essential oil (A) blends were added as additives to each formulation prior to curing to evaluate the effects of natural plant additives on the lipid composition and sensory characteristics of these natural herbal soaps. A total of seven natural soaps, three without additives (BB, H, FG) and four with additives (BBR, HA, FGR, FGA), were manufactured and studied. The majority (86–99%) of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (5.0–7.0 µg/mg) remained unsaponified in the manufactured natural soaps regardless of feedstock used. Principal component analysis (PCA) analyses showed the unsaponifiable fatty acids were different in the hibiscus bar compared to the other bars. There was a very strong correlation between the content of unsaponified C18:3n3 and C18:1n9 in all natural soaps. These results indicate that unsaponified fatty acids are important contributors to the quality and overall sensory perception and preference of natural herbal soaps following manufacturing by cold saponification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Antioxidant Capacities of Natural Products 2019)
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Open AccessArticle Walnut Protein Hydrolysates Play a Protective Role on Neurotoxicity Induced by d-Galactose and Aluminum Chloride in Mice
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2308; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092308
Received: 16 August 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 7 September 2018 / Published: 10 September 2018
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Abstract
In recent years, with an increase in the aging population, neurodegenerative diseases have attracted more and more attention. This study aimed to investigate the potential neuroprotective effect of defatted walnut meal protein hydrolysates (DWMPH) on neurotoxicity induced by d-galactose (d-gal)
[...] Read more.
In recent years, with an increase in the aging population, neurodegenerative diseases have attracted more and more attention. This study aimed to investigate the potential neuroprotective effect of defatted walnut meal protein hydrolysates (DWMPH) on neurotoxicity induced by d-galactose (d-gal) and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) in mice. The animal models were established by combining treatments with d-gal (200 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and AlCl3 (100 mg/kg in drinking water) for 90 days. During the 90 days, 1 g/kg of DWMPH was administrated orally every day. The results indicated that DWMPH treatment alleviated oxidative stress, reversed cholinergic dysfunction, and suppressed the release of proinflammatory cytokines in the brains of d-gal + AlCl3-treated mice, and thus improving the learning and memory functions of these mice, which was closely correlated with the strong antioxidant activity of DWMPH. This finding suggests that DWMPH might be a promising dietary supplement in improving neuronal dysfunctions of the brain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Antioxidant Capacities of Natural Products 2019)
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Graphical abstract

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