Special Issue "Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Structural Metals and Alloys"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Andrey Belyakov

Belgorod State Univ, Pobeda 85, Belgorod 308015, Russia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: structural steels and alloys; microstructure; texture; phase content; dislocation substructure; cold to hot worked microstructures; annealing behavior; strengthening mechanisms; mechanical properties

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mechanical properties of polycrystalline structural metals and alloys are significantly affected by their microstructural state, including phase content, grain/subgrain sizes, grain boundary distribution, dispersed particles and solutes, dislocation density, internal stresses, etc. Therefore, the studies on structure–property relationships are of a great practical importance. The development of metallic materials with desired structural state results in beneficial combinations of mechanical properties in accordance with exploitation conditions. Various thermo-mechanical treatments are generally used to produce metallic semi-products with suitable microstructures, which are developed owing to combined operation of diverse mechanisms of microstructure evolution. The effect of processing regimes/conditions and methods on the regularities of structural changes in metals and alloys should be studied in detail to supply materials scientists with a fundamental knowledge providing the progress in creation of novel techniques and optimization of conventional technologies of production of structural materials with enhanced unique properties. The aim of this Special Issue is to present the latest achievements in theoretical and experimental investigations of mechanisms of microstructural changes/evolutions in various metallic materials subjected to different processing methods and their effect on mechanical properties. The studies focused on the simulation and analysis of mechanical behavior of structural metals and alloys during exploitation are also welcome.

Dr. Andrey Belyakov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Structural steels and alloys
  • Microstructure and texture
  • Deformation and annealing behavior
  • Static/dynamic recovery and recrystallization
  • Grain refinement
  • Grain/subgrain boundaries
  • Dislocations and internal stresses
  • Mechanical properties
  • Strengthening mechanisms

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Formation of Strong {100} Texture by Dynamic Strain-Induced Boundary Migration in Hot Compressed Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe Alloy
Metals 2017, 7(10), 412; doi:10.3390/met7100412
Received: 6 September 2017 / Revised: 23 September 2017 / Accepted: 26 September 2017 / Published: 3 October 2017
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Abstract
The microstructure and texture evolution of Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-Fe alloy during hot compression were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction technique. The results reveal that two main texture components containing <100> and <111> fiber textures form after the hot compression. The fraction of each component
[...] Read more.
The microstructure and texture evolution of Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-Fe alloy during hot compression were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction technique. The results reveal that two main texture components containing <100> and <111> fiber textures form after the hot compression. The fraction of each component is mainly controlled by deformation and strain rate. Dynamic strain-induced boundary migration (D-SIBM) is proved to be the reason that <100>-oriented grains grow towards <111>-oriented grains. The <100>-oriented grains coarsen with the increasing <100> texture intensity. Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurs under a low strain rate and large deformation. The DRX grains were detected by the method of grain orientation spread. The DRX grains reserve a <100> fiber texture similar to the deformation texture; however, DRX is not the main reason causing the formation of a strong <100> texture, due to its low volume fraction. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Al2O3 Nanoparticles as Reinforcement on the Tensile Behavior of Al-12Si Composites
Metals 2017, 7(9), 359; doi:10.3390/met7090359
Received: 16 August 2017 / Revised: 5 September 2017 / Accepted: 7 September 2017 / Published: 10 September 2017
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Abstract
Al2O3 nanoparticle-reinforced Al-12Si matrix composites were successfully fabricated by hot pressing and subsequent hot extrusion. The influence of weight fraction of Al2O3 particles on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and the corresponding strengthening mechanisms were investigated in detail.
[...] Read more.
Al2O3 nanoparticle-reinforced Al-12Si matrix composites were successfully fabricated by hot pressing and subsequent hot extrusion. The influence of weight fraction of Al2O3 particles on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and the corresponding strengthening mechanisms were investigated in detail. The Al2O3 particles are uniformly distributed in the matrix, when 2 and 5 wt. % of Al2O3 particles were added to the Al-12Si matrix. Significant agglomeration can be found in composites with 10 wt. % addition of Al2O3 nanoparticles. The maximum hardness, the yield strength, and tensile strength were obtained for the composite with 5 wt. % Al2O3 addition, which showed an increase of about ~11%, 23%, and 26%, respectively, compared with the Al-12Si matrix. Meanwhile, the elongation increased to about ~30%. The contribution of different mechanisms including Orowan strengthening, thermal mismatch strengthening, and load transfer strengthening were analyzed. It was shown that the thermal mismatch strengthening has a more significant contribution to strengthening these composites than the Orowan and load transfer strengthening mechanisms. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Emergence and Progression of Abnormal Grain Growth in Minimally Strained Nickel-200
Metals 2017, 7(9), 334; doi:10.3390/met7090334
Received: 1 July 2017 / Revised: 18 August 2017 / Accepted: 23 August 2017 / Published: 30 August 2017
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Abstract
Grain boundary engineering (GBE) is a thermomechanical processing technique used to control the distribution, arrangement, and identity of grain boundary networks, thereby improving their mechanical properties. In both GBE and non-GBE metals, the phenomena of abnormal grain growth (AGG) and its contributing factors
[...] Read more.
Grain boundary engineering (GBE) is a thermomechanical processing technique used to control the distribution, arrangement, and identity of grain boundary networks, thereby improving their mechanical properties. In both GBE and non-GBE metals, the phenomena of abnormal grain growth (AGG) and its contributing factors is still a subject of much interest and research. In a previous study, GBE was performed on minimally strained (ε < 10%), commercially pure Nickel-200 via cyclic annealing, wherein unique onset temperature and induced strain pairings were identified for the emergence of AGG. In this study, crystallographic segmentation of grain orientations from said experiments are leveraged in tandem with image processing to quantify growth rates for abnormal grains within the minimally strained regime. Advances in growth rates are shown to vary directly with initial strain content but inversely with initiating AGG onset temperature. A numeric estimator for advancement rates associated with AGG is also derived and presented. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Study on Microstructure and Properties of Bimodal Structured Ultrafine-Grained Ferrite Steel
Metals 2017, 7(8), 316; doi:10.3390/met7080316
Received: 24 June 2017 / Revised: 3 August 2017 / Accepted: 16 August 2017 / Published: 18 August 2017
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Abstract
The objective of the study research was to obtain bimodal structured ultrafine-grained ferrite steel with outstanding mechanical properties and excellent corrosion resistance. The bimodal microstructure was fabricated by the cold rolling and annealing process of a dual-phase steel. The influences of the annealing
[...] Read more.
The objective of the study research was to obtain bimodal structured ultrafine-grained ferrite steel with outstanding mechanical properties and excellent corrosion resistance. The bimodal microstructure was fabricated by the cold rolling and annealing process of a dual-phase steel. The influences of the annealing process on microstructure evolution and the mechanical properties of the cold-rolled dual-phase steel were investigated. The effect of bimodal microstructure on corrosion resistance was also studied. The results showed that the bimodal characteristic of ferrite steel was most apparent in cold-rolled samples annealed at 650 °C for 40 min. More importantly, due to the coordinated action of fine-grained strengthening, back-stress strengthening, and precipitation strengthening, the yield strength (517 MPa) of the bimodal microstructure improved significantly, while the total elongation remained at a high level of 26%. The results of corrosion experiments showed that the corrosion resistance of bimodal ferrite steel was better than that of dual-phase steel with the same composition. This was mainly because the Volta potential difference of bimodal ferrite steel was smaller than that of dual-phase steel, which was conducive to forming a protective rust layer. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Microstructures and Tensile Properties of As-Extruded Mg–4Sm–xZn–0.5Zr (x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 wt %) Alloys
Metals 2017, 7(7), 281; doi:10.3390/met7070281
Received: 19 June 2017 / Revised: 17 July 2017 / Accepted: 19 July 2017 / Published: 24 July 2017
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Abstract
The microstructures and tensile properties of as-cast and as-extruded Mg–4Sm–xZn–0.5Zr (x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 wt %) alloys were systematically investigated by optical microscope, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Numerous nanoscale
[...] Read more.
The microstructures and tensile properties of as-cast and as-extruded Mg–4Sm–xZn–0.5Zr (x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 wt %) alloys were systematically investigated by optical microscope, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Numerous nanoscale dynamic precipitates could be observed in the as-extruded alloys containing high content of Zn, and the nanoscale particles were termed as (Mg,Zn)3Sm phase. Some basal disc-like precipitates were observed in as-extruded Mg–4Sm–4Zn–0.5Zr alloy, which were proposed to have a hexagonal structure with a = 0.556 nm. The dynamic precipitates effectively pinned the motions of DRXed (dynamic recrystallized) grain boundaries leading to an obvious reduction of DRXed grain size, and the tensile yield strength of as-extruded alloy was improved. The as-extruded Mg–4Sm–4Zn–0.5Zr alloy exhibits the best comprehensive mechanical properties at room temperature among all the alloys, and the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and elongation are about 246 MPa, 273 MPa and 21% respectively. Full article
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