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Special Issue "Interaction between Nano-Structure Materials and Cells"

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A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Material Sciences and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Akiyoshi Taniguchi

1 Advanced Medical Materials Group, Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba-shi Ibaraki, 305-004 Japan
2 Wased University-NIMS Joint Graduate Program, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Fax: +81 29 860 4714
Interests: cell- based biosensor; nanotoxicology; in vitro co-culture; microfluidics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The interactions between human cells and biomaterials are one of the substantial studies to produce novel biomaterials with enhanced cells integration properties. As living cells in their native environment, are embedded in complex, well defined organic matters called “extracellular matrix” ECM. The ECM possesses the essential physical and biochemical cues that trigger the optimum cellular behaviors. The individual ECM molecules, such as collagen moieties, which are a fibrous protein with a triple helical structure, are approximately 300 nm long and 1.5 nm wide. These helices are assembled into fibrils that extend for tens of micrometers in length and have diameters between 260 and 410 nm. Therefore, micro/nano-texturing features of ECM provide the essential cues that deeply influence cell morphology, migration, adhesion, and proliferation. Consequently, modification of biomaterial surface texturing and topography would provide an excellent mean to control cellular functions. Nanotechnology now could mimic the unique ECM structures. Study of interaction between Nano-structure materials and cells will be provide useful information for biofunctional materials development.  This new special issue “Interaction between Nano-structure materials and cells” will include research papers and review articles reflecting the most recent progresses and challenges in this dynamic research area.

Prof. Akiyoshi Taniguchi
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF.


Keywords

  • nanopatterning
  • nanomaterials
  • nanoparticles
  • cellular response
  • cell function
  • nanotoxicology
  • biomaterials
  • tissue engineering

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Comparison of the Osteogenic Potential of Titanium- and Modified Zirconia-Based Bioceramics
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15(3), 4442-4452; doi:10.3390/ijms15034442
Received: 28 January 2014 / Revised: 6 March 2014 / Accepted: 10 March 2014 / Published: 13 March 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (554 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Zirconia is now favored over titanium for use in dental implant materials because of its superior aesthetic qualities. However, zirconia is susceptible to degradation at lower temperatures. In order to address this issue, we have developed modified zirconia implants that contain tantalum [...] Read more.
Zirconia is now favored over titanium for use in dental implant materials because of its superior aesthetic qualities. However, zirconia is susceptible to degradation at lower temperatures. In order to address this issue, we have developed modified zirconia implants that contain tantalum oxide or niobium oxide. Cells attached as efficiently to the zirconia implants as to titanium-based materials, irrespective of surface roughness. Cell proliferation on the polished surface was higher than that on the rough surfaces, but the converse was true for the osteogenic response. Cells on yttrium (Y)/tantalum (Ta)- and yttrium (Y)/niobium (Nb)-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (TZP) discs ((Y, Ta)-TZP and (Y, Nb)-TZP, respectively) had a similar proliferative potential as those grown on anodized titanium. The osteogenic potential of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells on (Y, Ta)-TZP and (Y, Nb)-TZP was similar to that of cells grown on rough-surface titanium. These data demonstrate that improved zirconia implants, which are resistant to temperature-induced degradation, retain the desirable clinical properties of structural stability and support of an osteogenic response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interaction between Nano-Structure Materials and Cells)
Open AccessArticle The Effect of Physical and Chemical Cues on Hepatocellular Function and Morphology
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15(3), 4299-4317; doi:10.3390/ijms15034299
Received: 18 November 2013 / Revised: 14 February 2014 / Accepted: 25 February 2014 / Published: 11 March 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1214 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Physical topographical features and/or chemical stimuli to the extracellular matrix (ECM) provide essential cues that manipulate cell functions. From the physical point of view, contoured nanostructures are very important for cell behavior in general, and for cellular functions. From the chemical point [...] Read more.
Physical topographical features and/or chemical stimuli to the extracellular matrix (ECM) provide essential cues that manipulate cell functions. From the physical point of view, contoured nanostructures are very important for cell behavior in general, and for cellular functions. From the chemical point of view, ECM proteins containing an RGD sequence are known to alter cell functions. In this study, the influence of integrated physical and chemical cues on a liver cell line (HepG2) was investigated. To mimic the physical cues provided by the ECM, amorphous TiO2 nanogratings with specific dimensional and geometrical characteristics (nanogratings 90 nm wide and 150 nm apart) were fabricated. To mimic the chemical cues provided by the ECM, the TiO2 inorganic film was modified by immobilization of the RGD motif. The hepatic cell line morphological and functional changes induced by simultaneously combining these diversified cues were investigated, including cellular alignment and the expression of different functional proteins. The combination of nanopatterns and surface modification with RGD induced cellular alignment and expression of functional proteins, indicating that physical and chemical cues are important factors for optimizing hepatocyte function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interaction between Nano-Structure Materials and Cells)
Open AccessArticle Enhanced Bonding Strength of Hydrophobically Modified Gelatin Films on Wet Blood Vessels
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15(2), 2142-2156; doi:10.3390/ijms15022142
Received: 9 December 2013 / Revised: 15 January 2014 / Accepted: 22 January 2014 / Published: 29 January 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (898 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The bonding behavior between hydrophobically modified alkaline-treated gelatin (hm-AlGltn) films and porcine blood vessels was evaluated under wet conditions. Hexanoyl (Hx: C6), decanoyl (Dec: C10), and stearyl (Ste: C18) chlorides were introduced into the amino groups [...] Read more.
The bonding behavior between hydrophobically modified alkaline-treated gelatin (hm-AlGltn) films and porcine blood vessels was evaluated under wet conditions. Hexanoyl (Hx: C6), decanoyl (Dec: C10), and stearyl (Ste: C18) chlorides were introduced into the amino groups of AlGltn to obtain HxAlGltn, DecAlGltn, and SteAlGltn, respectively, with various modification percentages. The hm-AlGltn was fabricated into films and thermally crosslinked to obtain water-insoluble films (t-hm-AlGltn). The 42% modified t-HxAlGltn (t-42HxAlGltn) possessed higher wettability than the 38% modified t-DecAlGltn (t-38DecAlGltn) and the 44% modified t-SteAlGltn (t-44SteAlGltn) films, and the t-42HxAlGltn film showed a high bonding strength with the blood vessel compared with all the hm-AlGltn films. Histological observations indicated that t-42HxAlGltn and t-38DecAlGltn remained on the blood vessel even after the bonding strength measurements. From cell culture experiments, the t-42HxAlGltn films showed significant cell adhesion compared to other films. These findings indicate that the Hx group easily interpenetrated the surface of blood vessels and effectively enhanced the bonding strength between the films and the tissue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interaction between Nano-Structure Materials and Cells)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Cellular Behavior of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Wettable Gradient Polyethylene Surfaces
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15(2), 2075-2086; doi:10.3390/ijms15022075
Received: 22 November 2013 / Revised: 21 January 2014 / Accepted: 22 January 2014 / Published: 28 January 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (502 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Appropriate surface wettability and roughness of biomaterials is an important factor in cell attachment and proliferation. In this study, we investigated the correlation between surface wettability and roughness, and biological response in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). We prepared wettable and rough [...] Read more.
Appropriate surface wettability and roughness of biomaterials is an important factor in cell attachment and proliferation. In this study, we investigated the correlation between surface wettability and roughness, and biological response in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). We prepared wettable and rough gradient polyethylene (PE) surfaces by increasing the power of a radio frequency corona discharge apparatus with knife-type electrodes over a moving sample bed. The PE changed gradually from hydrophobic and smooth surfaces to hydrophilic (water contact angle, 90° to ~50°) and rough (80 to ~120 nm) surfaces as the power increased. We found that hADSCs adhered better to highly hydrophilic and rough surfaces and showed broadly stretched morphology compared with that on hydrophobic and smooth surfaces. The proliferation of hADSCs on hydrophilic and rough surfaces was also higher than that on hydrophobic and smooth surfaces. Furthermore, integrin beta 1 gene expression, an indicator of attachment, and heat shock protein 70 gene expression were high on hydrophobic and smooth surfaces. These results indicate that the cellular behavior of hADSCs on gradient surface depends on surface properties, wettability and roughness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interaction between Nano-Structure Materials and Cells)
Open AccessArticle Cell-Based in Vitro Blood–Brain Barrier Model Can Rapidly Evaluate Nanoparticles’ Brain Permeability in Association with Particle Size and Surface Modification
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15(2), 1812-1825; doi:10.3390/ijms15021812
Received: 21 November 2013 / Revised: 2 January 2014 / Accepted: 20 January 2014 / Published: 24 January 2014
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (556 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The possibility of nanoparticle (NP) uptake to the human central nervous system is a major concern. Recent reports showed that in animal models, nanoparticles (NPs) passed through the blood–brain barrier (BBB). For the safe use of NPs, it is imperative to evaluate [...] Read more.
The possibility of nanoparticle (NP) uptake to the human central nervous system is a major concern. Recent reports showed that in animal models, nanoparticles (NPs) passed through the blood–brain barrier (BBB). For the safe use of NPs, it is imperative to evaluate the permeability of NPs through the BBB. Here we used a commercially available in vitro BBB model to evaluate the permeability of NPs for a rapid, easy and reproducible assay. The model is reconstructed by culturing both primary rat brain endothelial cells and pericytes to support the tight junctions of endothelial cells. We used the permeability coefficient (Papp) to determine the permeability of NPs. The size dependency results, using fluorescent silica NPs (30, 100, and 400 nm), revealed that the Papp for the 30 nm NPs was higher than those of the larger silica. The surface charge dependency results using Qdots® (amino-, carboxyl-, and PEGylated-Qdots), showed that more amino-Qdots passed through the model than the other Qdots. Usage of serum-containing buffer in the model resulted in an overall reduction of permeability. In conclusion, although additional developments are desired to elucidate the NPs transportation, we showed that the BBB model could be useful as a tool to test the permeability of nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interaction between Nano-Structure Materials and Cells)
Open AccessArticle Magnetic Nanoparticles as Intraocular Drug Delivery System to Target Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15(1), 1590-1605; doi:10.3390/ijms15011590
Received: 9 December 2013 / Revised: 3 January 2014 / Accepted: 6 January 2014 / Published: 22 January 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1066 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
One of the most challenging efforts in drug delivery is the targeting of the eye. The eye structure and barriers render this organ poorly permeable to drugs. Quite recently the entrance of nanoscience in ocular drug delivery has improved the penetration and [...] Read more.
One of the most challenging efforts in drug delivery is the targeting of the eye. The eye structure and barriers render this organ poorly permeable to drugs. Quite recently the entrance of nanoscience in ocular drug delivery has improved the penetration and half-life of drugs, especially in the anterior eye chamber, while targeting the posterior chamber is still an open issue. The retina and the retinal pigment epithelium/choroid tissues, located in the posterior eye chamber, are responsible for the majority of blindness both in childhood and adulthood. In the present study, we used magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a nanotool for ocular drug delivery that is capable of specific localization in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) layer. We demonstrate that, following intraocular injection in Xenopus embryos, MNPs localize specifically in RPE where they are retained for several days. The specificity of the localization did not depend on particle size and surface properties of the MNPs used in this work. Moreover, through similar experiments in zebrafish, we demonstrated that the targeting of RPE by the nanoparticles is not specific for the Xenopus species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interaction between Nano-Structure Materials and Cells)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Temperature-Responsive Poly(ε-caprolactone) Cell Culture Platform with Dynamically Tunable Nano-Roughness and Elasticity for Control of Myoblast Morphology
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15(1), 1511-1524; doi:10.3390/ijms15011511
Received: 6 December 2013 / Revised: 15 January 2014 / Accepted: 16 January 2014 / Published: 21 January 2014
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (1154 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We developed a dynamic cell culture platform with dynamically tunable nano-roughness and elasticity. Temperature-responsive poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films were successfully prepared by crosslinking linear and tetra-branched PCL macromonomers. By optimizing the mixing ratios, the crystal-amorphous transition temperature (Tm) of the [...] Read more.
We developed a dynamic cell culture platform with dynamically tunable nano-roughness and elasticity. Temperature-responsive poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films were successfully prepared by crosslinking linear and tetra-branched PCL macromonomers. By optimizing the mixing ratios, the crystal-amorphous transition temperature (Tm) of the crosslinked film was adjusted to the biological relevant temperature (~33 °C). While the crosslinked films are relatively stiff (50 MPa) below the Tm, they suddenly become soft (1 MPa) above the Tm. Correspondingly, roughness of the surface was decreased from 63.4–12.4 nm. It is noted that the surface wettability was independent of temperature. To investigate the role of dynamic surface roughness and elasticity on cell adhesion, cells were seeded on PCL films at 32 °C. Interestingly, spread myoblasts on the film became rounded when temperature was suddenly increased to 37 °C, while significant changes in cell morphology were not observed for fibroblasts. These results indicate that cells can sense dynamic changes in the surrounding environment but the sensitivity depends on cell types. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interaction between Nano-Structure Materials and Cells)
Open AccessArticle Ultrastructural Interactions and Genotoxicity Assay of Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Mouse Oocytes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14(11), 21613-21628; doi:10.3390/ijms141121613
Received: 23 August 2013 / Revised: 4 October 2013 / Accepted: 17 October 2013 / Published: 31 October 2013
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (727 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 ENPs) are on the priority list of nanomaterials requiring evaluation. We performed in vitro assays on mature mouse oocytes incubated with CeO2 ENPs to study (1) physicochemical biotransformation of ENPs in culture [...] Read more.
Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 ENPs) are on the priority list of nanomaterials requiring evaluation. We performed in vitro assays on mature mouse oocytes incubated with CeO2 ENPs to study (1) physicochemical biotransformation of ENPs in culture medium; (2) ultrastructural interactions with follicular cells and oocytes using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM); (3) genotoxicity of CeO2 ENPs on follicular cells and oocytes using a comet assay. DNA damage was quantified as Olive Tail Moment. We show that ENPs aggregated, but their crystal structure remained stable in culture medium. TEM showed endocytosis of CeO2 ENP aggregates in follicular cells. In oocytes, CeO2 ENP aggregates were only observed around the zona pellucida (ZP). The comet assay revealed significant DNA damage in follicular cells. In oocytes, the comet assay showed a dose-related increase in DNA damage and a significant increase only at the highest concentrations. DNA damage decreased significantly both in follicular cells and in oocytes when an anti-oxidant agent was added in the culture medium. We hypothesise that at low concentrations of CeO2 ENPs oocytes could be protected against indirect oxidative stress due to a double defence system composed of follicular cells and ZP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interaction between Nano-Structure Materials and Cells)
Open AccessArticle Comparison of Cellular Uptake and Inflammatory Response via Toll-Like Receptor 4 to Lipopolysaccharide and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14(7), 13154-13170; doi:10.3390/ijms140713154
Received: 9 May 2013 / Revised: 10 June 2013 / Accepted: 17 June 2013 / Published: 26 June 2013
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (482 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The innate immune response is the earliest cellular response to infectious agents and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in these interactions. We have already shown that TLRs are involved with the uptake of [...] Read more.
The innate immune response is the earliest cellular response to infectious agents and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in these interactions. We have already shown that TLRs are involved with the uptake of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) and promote inflammatory responses. In this paper, we compared role of cellular uptake and inflammatory response via TLR 4 to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and TiO2 NPs. In the case of LPS, LPS binds to LPS binding protein (LBP) and CD 14, and then this complex binds to TLR 4. In the case of TiO2 NPs, the necessity of LBP and CD 14 to induce the inflammatory response and for uptake by cells was investigated using over-expression, antibody blocking, and siRNA knockdown experiments. Our results suggested that for cellular uptake of TiO2 NPs, TLR 4 did not form a complex with LBP and CD 14. In the TiO2 NP-mediated inflammatory response, TLR 4 acted as the signaling receptor without protein complex of LPS, LBP and CD 14. The results suggested that character of TiO2 NPs might be similar to the complex of LPS, LBP and CD 14. These results are important for development of safer nanomaterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interaction between Nano-Structure Materials and Cells)

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