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Special Issue "Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yu-Pin Lin

Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 40617, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 886-2-33663467
Fax: +86 2 23686980
Interests: spatial statistics and modeling in environmental and ecological systems; applications of GIS and remote sensing in environmental and ecological systems; freshwater monitoring and modeling; optimal environmental monitoring network design; landscape ecology in land-use management and planning; ecohydrology; groundwater modeling; land-use planning and modeling; soil heavy metal pollution assessment; multiscale analysis in environmental and ecological systems; system dynamic modeling in environmental systems; ecosystem services; system dynamic modeling; optimization techniques

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ecosystems provide multiple beneficial nature-based goods, functions, and services to human beings and society. Many of these benefits are linked to positive outcomes in human health. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) proposed the definitions and scopes of ecosystem services. In recent years, a substantial amount of research has discussed the dependence of public health on ecosystem services. Such services include water and soil regulation and preservation; water and air filtration; biodiversity and habitat conservation; climate and natural hazard stabilization and mitigation; food, fuel, and fiber production; and the provision of aesthetic environments for recreation, education, and mental health. Accordingly, human and societal well-beings depend on the appropriate management and conservation of ecosystems (and their concomitant service provisions) throughout the globe.

Recent systematic reviews of the research literature that discusses the connections between ecosystem services and public health have found articles in fields of landscape and urban planning, as well as in land use management. Most of those studies highlight the necessity of understanding and quantifying changes of land use/cover patterns and of ecosystem services, which are induced by complex interactions between natural processes and the social drivers that ensure the sustainability of ecosystem services and environmental resources.

To illuminate these interactions, this Special Issue links to the 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference on Sustainable Land Use and Ecosystem Management. Accordingly, this Special Issue focuses on advanced methodologies of data retrieval and qualitative and/or quantitative model applications. The issue scope also embraces epistemic reasoning and discussion regarding the land cover and ecosystem managing strategies used to achieve sustainable use of ecosystem services and natural resources. Such discussions illustrate these resources’ connections with human/public health. Research papers on novel and concise techniques that encompass current developments of such studies are particularly welcome.

Prof. Dr. Yu-Pin Lin
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • policy and management strategies for sustainable land use and ecosystem management
  • investigation of vulnerability and resilience on critical lands for ecosystem services and human health
  • quantitative description of connections and interactions among ecosystem services, human health, and land management
  • models and analytical tools for land use management and ecosystem services
  • anthropogenic and urbanization impacts on ecosystem services
  • decision support systems for sustainable use of critical lands and ecosystem services

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Ecosystem Functions Connecting Contributions from Ecosystem Services to Human Wellbeing in a Mangrove System in Northern Taiwan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(6), 6542-6560; doi:10.3390/ijerph120606542
Received: 30 January 2015 / Revised: 22 May 2015 / Accepted: 3 June 2015 / Published: 9 June 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (678 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present study examined a mangrove ecosystem in northern Taiwan to determine how the various components of ecosystem function, ecosystem services and human wellbeing are connected. The overall contributions of mangrove services to specific components of human wellbeing were also assessed. A network
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The present study examined a mangrove ecosystem in northern Taiwan to determine how the various components of ecosystem function, ecosystem services and human wellbeing are connected. The overall contributions of mangrove services to specific components of human wellbeing were also assessed. A network was developed and evaluated by an expert panel consisting of hydrologists, ecologists, and experts in the field of culture, landscape or architecture. The results showed that supporting habitats was the most important function to human wellbeing, while water quality, habitable climate, air quality, recreational opportunities, and knowledge systems were services that were strongly linked to human welfare. Security of continuous supply of services appeared to be the key to a comfortable life. From a bottom-up and top-down perspective, knowledge systems (a service) were most supported by ecosystem functions, while the security of continuous supply of services (wellbeing) had affected the most services. In addition, the overall benefits of mangrove services to human prosperity concentrated on mental health, security of continuous supply of services, and physical health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference)
Open AccessArticle Incorporation of Spatial Interactions in Location Networks to Identify Critical Geo-Referenced Routes for Assessing Disease Control Measures on a Large-Scale Campus
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(4), 4170-4184; doi:10.3390/ijerph120404170
Received: 26 December 2014 / Revised: 7 April 2015 / Accepted: 7 April 2015 / Published: 14 April 2015
PDF Full-text (1395 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Respiratory diseases mainly spread through interpersonal contact. Class suspension is the most direct strategy to prevent the spread of disease through elementary or secondary schools by blocking the contact network. However, as university students usually attend courses in different buildings, the daily contact
[...] Read more.
Respiratory diseases mainly spread through interpersonal contact. Class suspension is the most direct strategy to prevent the spread of disease through elementary or secondary schools by blocking the contact network. However, as university students usually attend courses in different buildings, the daily contact patterns on a university campus are complicated, and once disease clusters have occurred, suspending classes is far from an efficient strategy to control disease spread. The purpose of this study is to propose a methodological framework for generating campus location networks from a routine administration database, analyzing the community structure of the network, and identifying the critical links and nodes for blocking respiratory disease transmission. The data comes from the student enrollment records of a major comprehensive university in Taiwan. We combined the social network analysis and spatial interaction model to establish a geo-referenced community structure among the classroom buildings. We also identified the critical links among the communities that were acting as contact bridges and explored the changes in the location network after the sequential removal of the high-risk buildings. Instead of conducting a questionnaire survey, the study established a standard procedure for constructing a location network on a large-scale campus from a routine curriculum database. We also present how a location network structure at a campus could function to target the high-risk buildings as the bridges connecting communities for blocking disease transmission. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference)
Open AccessArticle An Ecosystem-Service Approach to Evaluate the Role of Non-Native Species in Urbanized Wetlands
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(4), 3926-3943; doi:10.3390/ijerph120403926
Received: 31 January 2015 / Revised: 27 March 2015 / Accepted: 30 March 2015 / Published: 9 April 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Natural wetlands have been increasingly transformed into urbanized ecosystems commonly colonized by stress-tolerant non-native species. Although non-native species present numerous threats to natural ecosystems, some could provide important benefits to urbanized ecosystems. This study investigated the extent of colonization by non-native fish and
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Natural wetlands have been increasingly transformed into urbanized ecosystems commonly colonized by stress-tolerant non-native species. Although non-native species present numerous threats to natural ecosystems, some could provide important benefits to urbanized ecosystems. This study investigated the extent of colonization by non-native fish and bird species of three urbanized wetlands in subtropical Taiwan. Using literature data the role of each non-native species in the urbanized wetland was evaluated by their effect (benefits/damages) on ecosystem services (ES) based on their ecological traits. Our sites were seriously colonized by non-native fishes (39%–100%), but <3% by non-native birds. Although most non-native species could damage ES regulation (disease control and wastewater purification), some could be beneficial to the urbanized wetland ES. Our results indicated the importance of non-native fishes in supporting ES by serving as food source to fish-eating waterbirds (native, and migratory species) due to their high abundance, particularly for Oreochromis spp. However, all non-native birds are regarded as “harmful” species causing important ecosystem disservices, and thus eradication of these bird-invaders from urban wetlands would be needed. This simple framework for role evaluation of non-native species represents a holistic and transferable approach to facilitate decision making on management priority of non-native species in urbanized wetlands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference)
Open AccessArticle Delineating Biophysical Environments of the Sunda Banda Seascape, Indonesia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(2), 1069-1082; doi:10.3390/ijerph120201069
Received: 3 October 2014 / Accepted: 29 December 2014 / Published: 22 January 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2076 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Sunda Banda Seascape (SBS), located in the center of the Coral Triangle, is a global center of marine biodiversity and a conservation priority. We proposed the first biophysical environmental delineation of the SBS using globally available satellite remote sensing and model-assimilated data
[...] Read more.
The Sunda Banda Seascape (SBS), located in the center of the Coral Triangle, is a global center of marine biodiversity and a conservation priority. We proposed the first biophysical environmental delineation of the SBS using globally available satellite remote sensing and model-assimilated data to categorize this area into unique and meaningful biophysical classes. Specifically, the SBS was partitioned into eight biophysical classes characterized by similar sea surface temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, currents, and salinity patterns. Areas within each class were expected to have similar habitat types and ecosystem functions. Our work supplemented prevailing global marine management schemes by focusing in on a regional scale with finer spatial resolution. It also provided a baseline for academic research, ecological assessments and will facilitate marine spatial planning and conservation activities in the area. In addition, the framework and methods of delineating biophysical environments we presented can be expanded throughout the whole Coral Triangle to support research and conservation activities in this important region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference)
Open AccessArticle Addressing Health Disparities in Chronic Kidney Disease
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(12), 12848-12865; doi:10.3390/ijerph111212848
Received: 19 August 2014 / Revised: 21 November 2014 / Accepted: 3 December 2014 / Published: 11 December 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2730 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney
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According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012. However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database. The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran’s I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference)
Open AccessArticle Reasoning the Causality of City Sprawl, Traffic Congestion, and Green Land Disappearance in Taiwan Using the CLD Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(11), 11464-11480; doi:10.3390/ijerph111111464
Received: 20 August 2014 / Revised: 15 October 2014 / Accepted: 28 October 2014 / Published: 6 November 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (749 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many city governments choose to supply more developable land and transportation infrastructure with the hope of attracting people and businesses to their cities. However, like those in Taiwan, major cities worldwide suffer from traffic congestion. This study applies the system thinking logic of
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Many city governments choose to supply more developable land and transportation infrastructure with the hope of attracting people and businesses to their cities. However, like those in Taiwan, major cities worldwide suffer from traffic congestion. This study applies the system thinking logic of the causal loops diagram (CLD) model in the System Dynamics (SD) approach to analyze the issue of traffic congestion and other issues related to roads and land development in Taiwan’s cities. Comparing the characteristics of development trends with yearbook data for 2002 to 2013 for all of Taiwan’s cities, this study explores the developing phenomenon of unlimited city sprawl and identifies the cause and effect relationships in the characteristics of development trends in traffic congestion, high-density population aggregation in cities, land development, and green land disappearance resulting from city sprawl. This study provides conclusions for Taiwan’s cities’ sustainability and development (S&D). When developing S&D policies, during decision making processes concerning city planning and land use management, governments should think with a holistic view of carrying capacity with the assistance of system thinking to clarify the prejudices in favor of the unlimited developing phenomena resulting from city sprawl. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference)
Open AccessArticle Impact of Vehicular Networks on Emergency Medical Services in Urban Areas
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(11), 11348-11370; doi:10.3390/ijerph111111348
Received: 25 August 2014 / Revised: 23 October 2014 / Accepted: 24 October 2014 / Published: 31 October 2014
PDF Full-text (1870 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The speed with which emergency personnel can provide emergency treatment is crucial to reducing death and disability among acute and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, the rapid development of cities and increased numbers of vehicles are preventing emergency vehicles from easily reaching locations where
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The speed with which emergency personnel can provide emergency treatment is crucial to reducing death and disability among acute and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, the rapid development of cities and increased numbers of vehicles are preventing emergency vehicles from easily reaching locations where they are needed. A significant number of researchers are experimenting with vehicular networks to address this issue, but in most studies the focus has been on communication technologies and protocols, with few efforts to assess how network applications actually support emergency medical care. Our motivation was to search the literature for suggested methods for assisting emergency vehicles, and to use simulations to evaluate them. Our results and evidence-based studies were cross-referenced to assess each method in terms of cumulative survival ratio (CSR) gains for acute and critically ill patients. Simulation results indicate that traffic light preemption resulted in significant CSR increases of between 32.4% and 90.2%. Route guidance was found to increase CSRs from 14.1% to 57.8%, while path clearing increased CSRs by 15.5% or less. It is our hope that this data will support the efforts of emergency medical technicians, traffic managers, and policy makers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference)
Open AccessArticle Alternative Zoning Scenarios for Regional Sustainable Land Use Controls in China: A Knowledge-Based Multiobjective Optimisation Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(9), 8839-8866; doi:10.3390/ijerph110908839
Received: 2 April 2014 / Revised: 6 August 2014 / Accepted: 11 August 2014 / Published: 28 August 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1860 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Alternative land use zoning scenarios provide guidance for sustainable land use controls. This study focused on an ecologically vulnerable catchment on the Loess Plateau in China, proposed a novel land use zoning model, and generated alternative zoning solutions to satisfy the various requirements
[...] Read more.
Alternative land use zoning scenarios provide guidance for sustainable land use controls. This study focused on an ecologically vulnerable catchment on the Loess Plateau in China, proposed a novel land use zoning model, and generated alternative zoning solutions to satisfy the various requirements of land use stakeholders and managers. This model combined multiple zoning objectives, i.e., maximum zoning suitability, maximum planning compatibility and maximum spatial compactness, with land use constraints by using goal programming technique, and employed a modified simulated annealing algorithm to search for the optimal zoning solutions. The land use zoning knowledge was incorporated into the initialisation operator and neighbourhood selection strategy of the simulated annealing algorithm to improve its efficiency. The case study indicates that the model is both effective and robust. Five optimal zoning scenarios of the study area were helpful for satisfying the requirements of land use controls in loess hilly regions, e.g., land use intensification, agricultural protection and environmental conservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference)

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