Special Issue "Consideration of Ecosystem Services and Function for Sustainable Water Use"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yu-Pin Lin

Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 886-2-33663467
Fax: +86 2 23686980
Interests: spatial statistics and modeling in environmental and ecological systems; applications of GIS and remote sensing in environmental and ecological systems; freshwater monitoring and modeling; optimal environmental monitoring network design; landscape ecology in land-use management and planning; ecohydrology; groundwater modeling; land-use planning and modeling; soil heavy metal pollution assessment; multiscale analysis in environmental and ecological systems; system dynamic modeling in environmental systems; ecosystem services; system dynamic modeling; optimization techniques
Guest Editor
Dr. Dirk S. Schmeller

Department of Conservation Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0341 235 1654
Fax: 0341 235 1470
Interests: biodiversity monitoring; conservation biology; molecular diversity; population size; invasive species; range distribution; population genetics; evolutionary ecology; diseases of herptiles
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Wei-Cheng Lo

Department of Hydraulic and Ocean Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 886-6-2757575 ext 63264
Fax: 886-6-2741463
Interests: soil-water physics; modeling multiphase flow and transport in deformable porous media; saltwater intrusion into coastal aquifers; remediation of groundwater aquifers and enhanced oil recovery; poro-mechanics in fluid-containing porous media; mechanical interaction connecting geophysics to subsurface hydrology; soil erosion and conservation flood hydrology
Guest Editor
Dr. Wan-Yu Lien

Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 40617, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 886-2-33663464
Fax: 886-2-33663464
Interests: impact, vulnerability and resilience assessment of water resources to climate change; environmental system analysis; reservoir operation and planning; water resources management; heuristic algorithms

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ecosystem services (ESs), as defined by the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) initiative of the United Nations in 2005, are all ecosystem derived human benefits, such as carbon storage, recreation, water supply, soil retention, water regulation, and soil accumulation services. Due to the strong influence of human-to-ecosystems interactions on the sustainability of ESs, the MA initiative defined humans as a component of natural systems, and furthermore recommended more research in this area. It was noted that a fully understanding of the hydrological components and processes, and the entire ecosystem is essential in maintaining hydrological services strength. In order to meet this goal, the Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) approach was drafted by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations (UNDESA) in 2007. At its core, the IWRM supports the coordination and development of water, and land related resource management methods, strategies, and approaches, and finally to find balanced solutions, which maximize economic and social benefits as well as considering the long term integrity of ESs. In terms of efficiency, equity, and sustainability, the IWRM is a global recognized approach. A report conducted in 2011 by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP-DHI) and International Institute of Sustainable Development (IISD) found that by including ESs into the IWRM structure, a greater range of long-term benefits—socially, economically, and environmentally—would result. The report has prompted a great deal of research in recent years, extending the theory behind and applicability of both ES and IWRM concepts. The proposed Special Issue of the symposium will showcase recent studies in the field of ecosystem IWRM approaches, with the goal of increasing research and investment into IWRM process investigation.

Prof. Dr. Yu-Pin Lin
Dr. Dirk Schmeller
Dr. Wei-Cheng Lo
Dr. Wan-Yu Lien
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • integrated water resources management and ecosystem services
  • connections and interactions among ecosystem services and water resources management
  • sustainability of water uses and ecosystem services
  • consideration of hydrological services in water resources management
  • models and analytical tools for water management and ecosystem services
  • decision support systems for sustainable use of water and ecosystem services

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Combining Ecosystem Services with Cost-Benefit Analysis for Selection of Green and Grey Infrastructure for Flood Protection in a Cultural Setting
Environments 2017, 4(1), 3; doi:10.3390/environments4010003
Received: 4 December 2016 / Revised: 21 December 2016 / Accepted: 23 December 2016 / Published: 28 December 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5008 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present paper describes a methodological framework that combines ecosystem services (flood protection, education, art/culture, recreation and tourism) with economic analysis for selection of multifunctional measures for flood resilience. The framework includes active stakeholder participation and it consists of the four main components:
[...] Read more.
The present paper describes a methodological framework that combines ecosystem services (flood protection, education, art/culture, recreation and tourism) with economic analysis for selection of multifunctional measures for flood resilience. The framework includes active stakeholder participation and it consists of the four main components: (1) identification and valuation of ecosystem services pertinent to the project site under various mitigation scenarios, including baseline (pre-mitigation conditions); (2) evaluation of most effective flood mitigation measures through hydrodynamic simulations, and evaluation of economic viability using cost-benefit analysis; (3) selection of measures through consideration of ecosystem services, and solicitation of stakeholders’ inputs; (4) development of the conceptual landscape design. Application of the framework was demonstrated in a case study of Ayutthaya Island, Thailand. Results of our research suggest that taking a holistic perspective of ecosystem services and economic assessments, marshalled through active stakeholder participation, has the potential to achieve more ecologically sustainable and socially acceptable solutions for flood protection in areas with cultural heritage. However, there is still a considerable challenge in taking this framework to a full-scale practical implementation, and this mainly relates to the selection of indicators that can enable proper application of ecosystem services. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Investigating the Role of the Local Community as Co-Managers of the Mount Cameroon National Park Conservation Project
Environments 2016, 3(4), 36; doi:10.3390/environments3040036
Received: 17 October 2016 / Revised: 7 December 2016 / Accepted: 8 December 2016 / Published: 16 December 2016
PDF Full-text (3158 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Local forest management is essential for enhancing the sustainability of both communities’ livelihoods and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Land Degradation (REDD+) projects. However, few studies have examined the impact of forest ownership and control on community engagement and the functioning of communities
[...] Read more.
Local forest management is essential for enhancing the sustainability of both communities’ livelihoods and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Land Degradation (REDD+) projects. However, few studies have examined the impact of forest ownership and control on community engagement and the functioning of communities in a co-managing conservation initiative. This paper examines the influence of forest management on local participation and identifies the roles/functions of local communities in the Mount Cameroon National Park REDD+ conservation project. Cluster multi-stage random sampling was used to collect data from 259 respondents that were analysed using the chi-square, Mann–Whitney, t-test, Kruskal–Wallis, Jonckheere–Terpstra tests and NVivo. Results show that local communities have been involved in forest management practices before the establishment of the park. Communities support the establishment of a strict conservation zone and hope to promote local participation with a high expectation of benefits. Insecure tenure reduces project support and local engagement. Though communities massively support the initiative, engagement is low, and participants are not carrying out any tangible roles. They function mainly as manual labourers or mere committee members who only enforce rules/regulations within communities. Community-based natural resource management and integrated conservation and development projects have often not realised local expectations due to problems of application and impracticable legislation. Projects’ failure may be avoided by involving communities in tangible roles/functions and developing an effective co-management approach or establishing community-owned and -managed forest projects. This paper examines the progress of REDD+ from an early stage to help inform proponents in adapting strategies that are geared towards appropriate satisfactory outcomes, especially for local communities, to prevent the early failure of the initiative. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication Making Rice Production More Environmentally-Friendly
Environments 2016, 3(2), 12; doi:10.3390/environments3020012
Received: 19 February 2016 / Revised: 15 April 2016 / Accepted: 16 April 2016 / Published: 3 May 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (237 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Irrigated rice production is one of the most essential agricultural activities for sustaining our global population, and at the same time, one of the agricultural sectors considered most eco-unfriendly. This is because it consumes a larger share of available freshwater resources, competing with
[...] Read more.
Irrigated rice production is one of the most essential agricultural activities for sustaining our global population, and at the same time, one of the agricultural sectors considered most eco-unfriendly. This is because it consumes a larger share of available freshwater resources, competing with varied ecosystems as well as other economic sectors; its paddy fields are responsible for significant emission of greenhouse gases; and the reliance on chemical fertilizers and various agrochemicals contributes to pollution of soils and water systems. These stresses on soils, hydrology and atmosphere are actually not necessary for rice production, which can be increased by modifying agronomic practices though more agroecologically-sound management practices. These, combined under the rubric of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI), can reduce requirements of irrigation water, chemical fertilizer and agrochemicals while increasing paddy yields and farmer’s net incomes. Here we discuss how irrigated rice production can be made more eco-friendly for the benefit of farmers, consumers and the environment. This is achieved by introducing practices that improve the growth and functioning of rice plants’ root systems and enhance the abundance, diversity and activity of beneficial soil organisms that live around plant roots and within the plants themselves as symbiotic endophytes. Full article

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Post Construction Green Infrastructure Performance Monitoring Parameters and Their Functional Components
Environments 2017, 4(1), 2; doi:10.3390/environments4010002
Received: 14 September 2016 / Revised: 18 November 2016 / Accepted: 19 December 2016 / Published: 22 December 2016
PDF Full-text (1798 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Drainage system infrastructures in most urbanized cities have reached or exceeded their design life cycle and are characterized by running with inadequate capacity. These highly degraded infrastructures are already overwhelmed and continued to impose a significant challenge to the quality of water and
[...] Read more.
Drainage system infrastructures in most urbanized cities have reached or exceeded their design life cycle and are characterized by running with inadequate capacity. These highly degraded infrastructures are already overwhelmed and continued to impose a significant challenge to the quality of water and ecological systems. With predicted urban growth and climate change the situation is only going to get worse. As a result, municipalities are increasingly considering the concept of retrofitting existing stormwater drainage systems with green infrastructure practices as the first and an important step to reduce stormwater runoff volume and pollutant load inputs into combined sewer systems (CSO) and wastewater facilities. Green infrastructure practices include an open green space that can absorb stormwater runoff, ranging from small-scale naturally existing pocket of lands, right-of-way bioswales, and trees planted along the sidewalk as well as large-scale public parks. Despite the growing municipalities’ interest to retrofit existing stormwater drainage systems with green infrastructure, few studies and relevant information are available on their performance and cost-effectiveness. Therefore, this paper aims to help professionals learn about and become familiar with green infrastructure, decrease implementation barriers, and provide guidance for monitoring green infrastructure using the combination of survey questionnaires, meta-narrative and systematic literature review techniques. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top