Special Issue "Soil and Water Contamination, Remediation and Conservation"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yu-Pin Lin

Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 886-2-33663467
Fax: +86 2 23686980
Interests: spatial statistics and modeling in environmental and ecological systems; applications of GIS and remote sensing in environmental and ecological systems; freshwater monitoring and modeling; optimal environmental monitoring network design; landscape ecology in land-use management and planning; ecohydrology; groundwater modeling; land-use planning and modeling; soil heavy metal pollution assessment; multiscale analysis in environmental and ecological systems; system dynamic modeling in environmental systems; ecosystem services; system dynamic modeling; optimization techniques
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Zeng-Yei Hseu

Professor, Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, 1, Sect. 4th, Roosevelt road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan
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Interests: soil genesis and classification; soil quality evaluation; soil nutrient dynamics; behavior and bioavailability of heavy metals; soil remediation techniques and phytoremediation
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chihhao Fan

Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: river pollution control and water quality management; assessment of carrying capacity of water bodies; strategy for TMDL (total maximum daily load) implementation; watershed management; environmental chemistry; water and wastewater treatment; advanced oxidation processes; impact of macromolecule on AOP treatment efficiency; photo-catalytic oxidation of disinfection by-products in drinking water; transport and fate of environmental contaminants; quality assurance and conservation of agro-environment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the years, the advancement of modern technologies and urban expansion has resulted in a substantial increase in industrial pollution. As a consequence, sustainable management of soil and groundwater resources has become an issue of concern due to the massive and rapid aggravation of the environment by the discharge of anthropogenic pollutants. Without proper pretreatment, these discharged pollutants enter and accumulate in the soil and groundwater environmental compartments. They impair the sustainable use of these natural resources and may pose significant threats to both the ecological communities and the public. To mitigate such pollution, much effort has been undertaken in the investigation of: (1) applicable technologies for environmental quality improvement; (2) transport and distribution of concerning pollutants in the environment, and (3) risk assessment and management for the sustainable use of environment resources.

Being aware of the importance of land resource sustainability, the journal “Environments” intended to launch a special issue with the main theme of “Soil and Water Pollution Remediation and Ecological Conservation”. Articles related to, but not limited to, the innovative/significant findings in the field of environment pollution, remediation technology, contaminant transport and fate in the environment, ecological monitoring and restoration, risk assessment and management of land resource sustainability are welcome. All the papers submitted to this Special Issue, will receive a rigorous peer review procedure, rapid processing and wide dissemination of research results, developments and applications in the area of environmental protection.

Prof. Dr. Yu-Pin Lin
Prof. Dr. Zeng-Yei Hseu
Prof. Dr. Chihhao Fan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Contaminant fate and transport
  • Ecological monitoring and restoration
  • Risk assessment and management
  • Environmental remediation
  • Soil and water conservation
  • Management and sustainability of land resources

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Applicability of a Freundlich-Like Model for Plant Uptake at an Industrial Contaminated Site with a High Variable Arsenic Concentration
Environments 2017, 4(4), 67; doi:10.3390/environments4040067
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 19 September 2017 / Accepted: 20 September 2017 / Published: 23 September 2017
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Abstract
Phytoextraction is a low-cost technology with negligible environmental impacts. A major issue at the field scale is the heterogeneity of contaminant concentration since the entire site needs to be treated evenly even though zones may need different incisiveness in the treatment. The concentration
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Phytoextraction is a low-cost technology with negligible environmental impacts. A major issue at the field scale is the heterogeneity of contaminant concentration since the entire site needs to be treated evenly even though zones may need different incisiveness in the treatment. The concentration ratio (Cshoot/Csoil) is generally used to evaluate plant species performance and it includes for simplicity an assumption of linearity in the uptake behavior, although deviation from linearity has been observed in several studies. This work describes a phytoextraction feasibility test, conducted at a greenhouse scale for the remediation of an arsenic-contaminated site. Since a feasibility test should also provide an uptake model that accounts for plant growth in heterogeneous areas, the investigation focused on defining the uptake behavior of the various selected species growing in a site with homogeneous soil properties, but with considerable differences in arsenic concentration. Among the many models selectable to describe the soil-to-plant transfer, the Freundlich-like approach was tested. While remaining easy to handle, the non-linear model selected proves to be adequate to predict the arsenic uptake despite the complex contamination considered, thus allowing a more realistic prediction of the potential of a field-scale phytoremediation procedure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil and Water Contamination, Remediation and Conservation)
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Open AccessArticle Determination of Water Quality Degradation Due to Industrial and Household Wastewater in the Galing River in Kuantan, Malaysia Using Ion Chromatograph and Water Quality Data
Environments 2017, 4(2), 35; doi:10.3390/environments4020035
Received: 20 January 2017 / Revised: 29 March 2017 / Accepted: 18 April 2017 / Published: 23 April 2017
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Abstract
Water quality of the Galing River in Kuantan, Malaysia was examined to understand the anthropogenic environmental load in each administrative section, using water quality monitoring data and land use pattern. The National Physical Plan 2005 identified Kuantan as one of the country’s future
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Water quality of the Galing River in Kuantan, Malaysia was examined to understand the anthropogenic environmental load in each administrative section, using water quality monitoring data and land use pattern. The National Physical Plan 2005 identified Kuantan as one of the country’s future growth centers, which has resulted in rapid development and environmental degradation in the past decade. Multiple water quality indexes used by the Department of Environment, Malaysia and concentrations of several ionic species were examined to assess the river’s water quality. The following inferences were drawn in this study: (1) Cl and Na+ concentrations indicated that the basin area near the eastern urbanized area was subject to lesser human influence and lower environmental burden; (2) the Western side of the Galing River was subject to higher anthropogenic influence and indicated lower class levels of ammoniacal nitrogen, chemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen, compared to the eastern side; (3) Class V or near class V pH values were obtained upstream at the western side of the Galing River in the industrial area; (4) Two types of environmental burden were identified in the western side of the Galing River, namely, inflow of industrial wastewater upstream on the western side and the effect of household wastewater or untreated raw sewage wastewater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil and Water Contamination, Remediation and Conservation)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Ammonia Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in East Asian Paddy Soils—A Mini Review
Environments 2017, 4(4), 84; doi:10.3390/environments4040084
Received: 24 August 2017 / Revised: 12 November 2017 / Accepted: 15 November 2017 / Published: 18 November 2017
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Abstract
Ammonia oxidation is crucial in nitrogen removal and global nitrogen dynamics since it is the first step of the nitrification process. In this review, we focus on the distribution and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in East Asian
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Ammonia oxidation is crucial in nitrogen removal and global nitrogen dynamics since it is the first step of the nitrification process. In this review, we focus on the distribution and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in East Asian paddy soils with variable soil properties. The available East Asian paddy soil data shows that the ammonium concentration and pH ranges from 0.4 to 370 mg/kg and 5.1 to 8.2, respectively. Our meta-analysis suggest that AOA specific gene sequences are generally more abundant than those of AOB in both acidic and alkaline paddy soils, where Nitrosophaera and Nitrosospira amoA clusters mainly dominate the microbial community, respectively. In addition, the contribution of ammonia oxidizers to the nitrification process has been demonstrated using DNA-SIP (DNA-based stable-isotope probing); the results of these studies indicate that pH is the most important factor in niche separation of AOA and AOB under a variety of edaphic conditions. Finally, we discuss a number of other environmental variables that affect the abundance, distribution, and activity of AOA and AOB in East Asian paddy soils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil and Water Contamination, Remediation and Conservation)
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Other

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Open AccessProject Report Nitrate Leaching from Sand and Pumice Geomedia Amended with Pyrogenic Carbon Materials
Environments 2017, 4(4), 70; doi:10.3390/environments4040070
Received: 1 September 2017 / Revised: 24 September 2017 / Accepted: 30 September 2017 / Published: 3 October 2017
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Abstract
There is increasing interest in using pyrogenic carbon as an adsorbent for aqueous contaminants in stormwater. The objective of this study was to investigate pyrogenic carbon materials as an amendment to geomedia to reduce nitrate leaching. Batch adsorption and column experiments were conducted
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There is increasing interest in using pyrogenic carbon as an adsorbent for aqueous contaminants in stormwater. The objective of this study was to investigate pyrogenic carbon materials as an amendment to geomedia to reduce nitrate leaching. Batch adsorption and column experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of a commercial activated carbon and two biochars incorporated (5% by weight) into sand and pumice columns. The batch adsorption with 50 mg L−1 of nitrate solution showed that only activated carbon resulted in a substantial adsorption for nitrate up to 41%. Tested biochars were not effective in removing aqueous nitrate and even released nitrate (<1%) with 1 h reaction time. Column experiment with a pulse input of nitrate solution (50 mg L−1) confirmed that the sand or pumice columns amended with biochars were not as effective as those amended with activated carbon for reducing nitrate leaching. Our results suggested that net negatively charged surfaces of biochar may inhibit nitrate anion adsorption while activated carbon has reactive sites containing acidic functional groups to improve nitrate retention. There was no difference between sand and pumice for nitrate retention in any of the carbon amendments. Additional surface activation process during biochar production may be needed to improve adsorptive capacity of biochar for aqueous nitrate removal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil and Water Contamination, Remediation and Conservation)
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