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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(6), 6542-6560; doi:10.3390/ijerph120606542

Ecosystem Functions Connecting Contributions from Ecosystem Services to Human Wellbeing in a Mangrove System in Northern Taiwan

1
Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan
2
Department of Life Sciences and Research Center for Global Change Biology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
3
Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 January 2015 / Revised: 22 May 2015 / Accepted: 3 June 2015 / Published: 9 June 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference)
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Abstract

The present study examined a mangrove ecosystem in northern Taiwan to determine how the various components of ecosystem function, ecosystem services and human wellbeing are connected. The overall contributions of mangrove services to specific components of human wellbeing were also assessed. A network was developed and evaluated by an expert panel consisting of hydrologists, ecologists, and experts in the field of culture, landscape or architecture. The results showed that supporting habitats was the most important function to human wellbeing, while water quality, habitable climate, air quality, recreational opportunities, and knowledge systems were services that were strongly linked to human welfare. Security of continuous supply of services appeared to be the key to a comfortable life. From a bottom-up and top-down perspective, knowledge systems (a service) were most supported by ecosystem functions, while the security of continuous supply of services (wellbeing) had affected the most services. In addition, the overall benefits of mangrove services to human prosperity concentrated on mental health, security of continuous supply of services, and physical health. View Full-Text
Keywords: mangrove ecosystem; ecosystem functions; ecosystem services; human wellbeing; component connection network mangrove ecosystem; ecosystem functions; ecosystem services; human wellbeing; component connection network
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Hsieh, H.-L.; Lin, H.-J.; Shih, S.-S.; Chen, C.-P. Ecosystem Functions Connecting Contributions from Ecosystem Services to Human Wellbeing in a Mangrove System in Northern Taiwan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 6542-6560.

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