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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(4), 4170-4184; doi:10.3390/ijerph120404170

Incorporation of Spatial Interactions in Location Networks to Identify Critical Geo-Referenced Routes for Assessing Disease Control Measures on a Large-Scale Campus

Department of Geography, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Yu-Pin Lin
Received: 26 December 2014 / Revised: 7 April 2015 / Accepted: 7 April 2015 / Published: 14 April 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 2014 Global Land Project (GLP) Asia Conference)
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Abstract

Respiratory diseases mainly spread through interpersonal contact. Class suspension is the most direct strategy to prevent the spread of disease through elementary or secondary schools by blocking the contact network. However, as university students usually attend courses in different buildings, the daily contact patterns on a university campus are complicated, and once disease clusters have occurred, suspending classes is far from an efficient strategy to control disease spread. The purpose of this study is to propose a methodological framework for generating campus location networks from a routine administration database, analyzing the community structure of the network, and identifying the critical links and nodes for blocking respiratory disease transmission. The data comes from the student enrollment records of a major comprehensive university in Taiwan. We combined the social network analysis and spatial interaction model to establish a geo-referenced community structure among the classroom buildings. We also identified the critical links among the communities that were acting as contact bridges and explored the changes in the location network after the sequential removal of the high-risk buildings. Instead of conducting a questionnaire survey, the study established a standard procedure for constructing a location network on a large-scale campus from a routine curriculum database. We also present how a location network structure at a campus could function to target the high-risk buildings as the bridges connecting communities for blocking disease transmission. View Full-Text
Keywords: network analysis; community structure; spatial interaction; respiratory disease transmission network analysis; community structure; spatial interaction; respiratory disease transmission
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Wen, T.-H.; Chin, W.C.B. Incorporation of Spatial Interactions in Location Networks to Identify Critical Geo-Referenced Routes for Assessing Disease Control Measures on a Large-Scale Campus. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 4170-4184.

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