Special Issue "Responses of Forest Trees to Drought"

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A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Steven Jansen
Institute for Systematic Botany and Ecology, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Website: http://www.uni-ulm.de/en/nawi/sysbot/prof-dr-steven-jansen.html
Interests: functional wood anatomy and plant morphology, drought- induced tree mortality, topical plant diversity and ecology, aluminum accumulation and heavy metal uptake in plants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change poses a serious risk to our forests and the ecosystem services they provide to society. Increased drought stress, in particular, is likely to be a key element driving climate effects on forests, even in places not currently limited by water availability. Expected changes in forest composition and function may be mediated by (1) direct effects of extreme levels of drought on tree species, (2) indirect effects through the interaction of other climate-related disturbances (e.g., wildfires, pathogens, forest pests), (3) the progressive mismatch between the ecological niche of tree species and their current distribution due to increased and more intense drought events, and (4) the interaction with ongoing changes in forest management and land use due to new social scenarios demanding different uses and services from forests. With this special issue of the journal Forests, special attention will be given to vulnerability of tree species to drought, both at the tree level and the resilience mechanisms at the forest population and community levels.

Prof. Dr. Steven Jansen
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • drought stress
  • climate change
  • forest vulnerability and resilience
  • forest and tree mortality
  • drought-related forest disturbances (including wildfires, native or introduced forest pests, pathogens)

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Displaying article 1-8
p. 2281-2295
by  and
Forests 2015, 6(7), 2281-2295; doi:10.3390/f6072281
Received: 8 April 2015 / Revised: 4 June 2015 / Accepted: 17 June 2015 / Published: 30 June 2015
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responses of Forest Trees to Drought)
p. 2296-2306
by , , , , ,  and
Forests 2015, 6(7), 2296-2306; doi:10.3390/f6072296
Received: 24 March 2015 / Revised: 23 June 2015 / Accepted: 25 June 2015 / Published: 30 June 2015
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responses of Forest Trees to Drought)
p. 2241-2260
by , , , , , , ,  and
Forests 2015, 6(6), 2241-2260; doi:10.3390/f6062241
Received: 15 April 2015 / Revised: 9 June 2015 / Accepted: 16 June 2015 / Published: 19 June 2015
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responses of Forest Trees to Drought)
p. 2125-2147
by , ,  and
Forests 2015, 6(6), 2125-2147; doi:10.3390/f6062125
Received: 27 March 2015 / Accepted: 3 June 2015 / Published: 12 June 2015
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responses of Forest Trees to Drought)
p. 2082-2091
by ,  and
Forests 2015, 6(6), 2082-2091; doi:10.3390/f6062082
Received: 7 April 2015 / Revised: 28 May 2015 / Accepted: 3 June 2015 / Published: 9 June 2015
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responses of Forest Trees to Drought)
p. 2047-2065
by , , ,  and
Forests 2015, 6(6), 2047-2065; doi:10.3390/f6062047
Received: 28 March 2015 / Revised: 18 May 2015 / Accepted: 4 June 2015 / Published: 8 June 2015
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responses of Forest Trees to Drought)
p. 2029-2046
by  and
Forests 2015, 6(6), 2029-2046; doi:10.3390/f6062029
Received: 25 March 2015 / Accepted: 3 June 2015 / Published: 5 June 2015
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responses of Forest Trees to Drought)
p. 1576-1597
by ,  and
Forests 2015, 6(5), 1576-1597; doi:10.3390/f6051576
Received: 10 March 2015 / Revised: 20 April 2015 / Accepted: 24 April 2015 / Published: 5 May 2015
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Continued Changes in Tree Populations in Northern Arizona Mixed - conifer and Ponderosa Pine Forest in the Decade Following a Climate - Related Mortality Pulse
Author
: Joseph Ganey
Abstract
: Recent studies documented climate-mediated tree mortality in forests and woodlands throughout the southwestern U. S. Mortality occurred rapidly during and immediately following an extreme climate year in 2002 and was non - random with respect to tree species. We sampled trees in northern Arizona mixed - conifer and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests in 2004 and 2014, to see if these changes continued in subsequent years. Tree density did not differ significantly between 2004 and 2014 in either forest type, and basal area increased significantly in ponderosa pine forest. Spatial variation in extent of change in tree density and basal area among sample plots was high. Percent change in basal area was negatively associated with 2004 basal area in mixed - conifer forest and positively associated with elevation in ponderosa pine forest. Basal area increased in some species whereas other species, especially quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) and white fir (Abies concolor), showed large proportional decreases. Our results suggest a degree of short-term resilience in these forest types. Study duration was short relative to forest ecology and climate cycles, however, and considerable uncertainty remains regarding long - term, climate - related trends in these forest types.

Type of Paper: Article
Title:
Species Selection and Its Dependency on the Ecological Niche
Authors:
Tanja Sanders, Thomas Riedel, Wolfgang Beck
Affiliations:
Thünen-Institut für Waldökosysteme, Thünen Institute of Forest Ecosystems, Eberswalde, Germany
Abstract:
Bioclimatic envelop (BE) models are a convenient tool for scientist and politicians alike: they provide an easy to understand message about the future distribution of species. Hung up on the readily available parameters temperature and precipitation large areas can be classified depending on their suitability for certain species BE can be defined as the climatic component of the fundamental ecological niche, or the ‘climatic niche’ (Pearson & Dawson 2003). Lacking, however, are a minimum of two factors 1) climate is not the only determent for species distribution and 2) species undergo adaptive processes (for general critics cf.: Pearson & Dawson 2003, Dormann 2007, Huntley et al. 2010, Araújo & Townsend Peterson 2012). Four major limitations of BE models may be identified regarding the model assumptions: (1) species distribution ranges are determined only be climate variables, (2) there is an equilibrium between the realized species range and the its potential range determined by the climate, (3) species lack the ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions and (4) species interactions (e.g. competitive interactions) remain constant in future. A dual approach enables us to address two of these challenges: (1) calculation of species distribution based on the mean available water capacity between 1961-90 based on the national forest inventory data (BWI) in Germany and two future scenarios; and (2) quantification of adaptive capacity for Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies at selected sites using dendrochronological methods. Using available water capacity as a proxy to determine future species ditribution certain areas become apparent which would be classed as to dry or wet under the current point of adaption, respectivly. However, using dendroecological methods we can quantify the potential in adaptation and acclimatisation to add as potential new ranges for certain species.


Last update: 1 July 2015

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