Special Issue "Extreme Biomimetics"

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2017

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hermann Ehrlich

Institute of Experimental Physics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +00493731 392867
Fax: +0049 3731 394314
Interests: marine biomaterials; biominerals; biocomposites and biomimetics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The objective of this Special Issue is to gain a solid appreciation for the special significance of the word of modern biomimetics as well as the rapid and exciting evolution and expansion of Extreme Biomimetics and its applications in modern technology and medicine. This Issue is planned as a source on extreme (psychrophilic and thermophilic) biomineralization, solvothermal and hydrothermal chemistry of metal oxides and nanostructured composites, and bioinspired materials science for research in a variety of areas. Special attention will be paid to communities of organisms which survive extreme environmental conditions such as in Antarctic waters, hydrothermal vents, geothermal pipelines. The discussion of principles of Extreme Biomimetics with respect to metallization of chemically and thermally stable biopolymers is also welcome. For the first time such current concepts as hierarchical organization of hydrothermally or psychrophilic obtained biocomposites, structural bioscaffolds, biosculpturing, biomimetism and bioinspiration as tools for the design of innovative materials can be critically analyzed from both biological and materials sciences’ point of view using numerous unique examples from nature and Lab.

Prof. Dr. Hermann Ehrlich
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomimetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • biomimetics
  • hydrothermal synthesis
  • biomineralization
  • thermostable biopolymers
  • extremophiles
  • psychrophilic organisms

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Bacteria-Based Self-Healing Cementitious Composite for Application in Low-Temperature Marine Environments
Biomimetics 2017, 2(3), 13; doi:10.3390/biomimetics2030013
Received: 24 May 2017 / Revised: 11 July 2017 / Accepted: 12 July 2017 / Published: 14 July 2017
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Abstract
The current paper presents a bacteria-based self-healing cementitious composite for application in low-temperature marine environments. The composite was tested for its crack-healing capacity through crack water permeability measurements, and strength development through compression testing. The composite displayed an excellent crack-healing capacity, reducing the
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The current paper presents a bacteria-based self-healing cementitious composite for application in low-temperature marine environments. The composite was tested for its crack-healing capacity through crack water permeability measurements, and strength development through compression testing. The composite displayed an excellent crack-healing capacity, reducing the permeability of cracks 0.4 mm wide by 95%, and cracks 0.6 mm wide by 93% following 56 days of submersion in artificial seawater at 8 °C. Healing of the cracks was attributed to autogenous precipitation, autonomous bead swelling, magnesium-based mineral precipitation, and bacteria-induced calcium-based mineral precipitation in and on the surface of the bacteria-based beads. Mortar specimens incorporated with beads did, however, exhibit lower compressive strengths than plain mortar specimens. This study is the first to present a bacteria-based self-healing cementitious composite for application in low-temperature marine environments, while the formation of a bacteria-actuated organic–inorganic composite healing material represents an exciting avenue for self-healing concrete research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extreme Biomimetics)
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Open AccessArticle Immobilization of Titanium(IV) Oxide onto 3D Spongin Scaffolds of Marine Sponge Origin According to Extreme Biomimetics Principles for Removal of C.I. Basic Blue 9
Biomimetics 2017, 2(2), 4; doi:10.3390/biomimetics2020004
Received: 9 February 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 21 March 2017 / Published: 25 March 2017
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Abstract
The aim of extreme biomimetics is to design a bridge between extreme biomineralization and bioinspired materials chemistry, where the basic principle is to exploit chemically and thermally stable, renewable biopolymers for the development of the next generation of biologically inspired advanced and functional
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The aim of extreme biomimetics is to design a bridge between extreme biomineralization and bioinspired materials chemistry, where the basic principle is to exploit chemically and thermally stable, renewable biopolymers for the development of the next generation of biologically inspired advanced and functional composite materials. This study reports for the first time the use of proteinaceous spongin-based scaffolds isolated from marine demosponge Hippospongia communis as a three-dimensional (3D) template for the hydrothermal deposition of crystalline titanium dioxide. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) assisted with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping, low temperature nitrogen sorption, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), and attenuated total reflectance–Fourier transform infrared (ATR–FTIR) spectroscopy are used as characterization techniques. It was found that, after hydrothermal treatment crystalline titania in anatase form is obtained, which forms a coating around spongin microfibers through interaction with negatively charged functional groups of the structural protein as well as via hydrogen bonding. The material was tested as a potential heterogeneous photocatalyst for removal of C.I. Basic Blue 9 dye under UV irradiation. The obtained 3D composite material shows a high efficiency of dye removal through both adsorption and photocatalysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extreme Biomimetics)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Geomimetics and Extreme Biomimetics Inspired by Hydrothermal Systems—What Can We Learn from Nature for Materials Synthesis?
Biomimetics 2017, 2(2), 8; doi:10.3390/biomimetics2020008
Received: 1 March 2017 / Revised: 14 May 2017 / Accepted: 18 May 2017 / Published: 31 May 2017
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Abstract
‘Extreme biomimetics’ and ‘geomimetics’ are relatively recent fields of materials chemistry. Both take inspiration from natural materials for generating novel synthetic materials or enhanced properties in known materials. In geomimetics, the source of inspiration is geological systems, while extreme biomimetics is motivated by
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‘Extreme biomimetics’ and ‘geomimetics’ are relatively recent fields of materials chemistry. Both take inspiration from natural materials for generating novel synthetic materials or enhanced properties in known materials. In geomimetics, the source of inspiration is geological systems, while extreme biomimetics is motivated by organisms operating in—from an anthropocentric point of view—extreme conditions. This review article focuses on geomimetic and extreme biomimetic hydrothermal synthesis. Since hydrothermal preparative chemistry typically uses nothing but water and the required precursors, the field belongs to the research area of ‘green materials chemistry’. Geomimetics, on the one hand, takes inspiration from natural materials formation. Extreme Biomimetics, on the other hand, is inspired by materials found in extremophile organisms, instead of aiming to implement their actual biosynthesis. In this contribution, both extreme biomimetics and geomimetics are first defined, and further critically discussed on the basis of recent, selected examples. Moreover, the necessity for the two closely related fields as well their prospects are commented on. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extreme Biomimetics)
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