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Biomimetics 2017, 2(3), 13; doi:10.3390/biomimetics2030013

A Bacteria-Based Self-Healing Cementitious Composite for Application in Low-Temperature Marine Environments

Microlab, Section of Materials and Environment, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CN Delft, The Netherlands
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Academic Editor: Hermann Ehrlich
Received: 24 May 2017 / Revised: 11 July 2017 / Accepted: 12 July 2017 / Published: 14 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extreme Biomimetics)
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Abstract

The current paper presents a bacteria-based self-healing cementitious composite for application in low-temperature marine environments. The composite was tested for its crack-healing capacity through crack water permeability measurements, and strength development through compression testing. The composite displayed an excellent crack-healing capacity, reducing the permeability of cracks 0.4 mm wide by 95%, and cracks 0.6 mm wide by 93% following 56 days of submersion in artificial seawater at 8 °C. Healing of the cracks was attributed to autogenous precipitation, autonomous bead swelling, magnesium-based mineral precipitation, and bacteria-induced calcium-based mineral precipitation in and on the surface of the bacteria-based beads. Mortar specimens incorporated with beads did, however, exhibit lower compressive strengths than plain mortar specimens. This study is the first to present a bacteria-based self-healing cementitious composite for application in low-temperature marine environments, while the formation of a bacteria-actuated organic–inorganic composite healing material represents an exciting avenue for self-healing concrete research. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-healing concrete; bacteria-actuated; marine; low-temperature; organic–inorganic composite self-healing concrete; bacteria-actuated; marine; low-temperature; organic–inorganic composite
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Palin, D.; Wiktor, V.; Jonkers, H.M. A Bacteria-Based Self-Healing Cementitious Composite for Application in Low-Temperature Marine Environments. Biomimetics 2017, 2, 13.

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