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Special Issue "Climate Change Effects on Freshwater Organisms and Ecosystems"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Xing Fang

Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: water quality modeling; climate change; lakes; rivers; hydrological modeling; water resources engineering; watershed hydrology; water quality monitoring; water quality analysis; eutrophication; surface hydrology; rainfall runoff modelling; aquatic ecosystems; fish habitat; regional climate modeling; stormwater managment
Guest Editor
Dr. James Stoeckel

School of Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences College of Agriculture Auburn University Auburn, Alabama (AL) 36849-5337 USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-334-844-9249
Fax: +1-334-844-9208
Interests: population ecology; invasive species; ecotoxicology; population bottlenecks; physiological ecology; freshwater invertebrates

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Understanding the effects of the changing global environment on freshwater organisms and ecosystems is fundamental to improving ecological and environmental strategies and mitigation methods to protect freshwater ecosystems. Although freshwater systems (streams, lakes, and reservoirs) comprise less than 1% of the world’s water, they play a critically important role in the Earth’s ecosystem and biosphere. Freshwater systems contain a disproportionately high level of species richness (species/km2) compared to marine and terrestrial systems, but, unfortunately, they also contain a disproportionately high level of imperiled species. Freshwater systems are also a critical source of drinking and irrigation water for humans. Changes in the global environment are driven by a combination of natural and anthropogenic (e.g. urban/agricultural/industrial) drivers, resulting in changing climate and land-use/land-cover patterns. These changes may lead to hydrological, chemical, and biological changes in freshwater systems and associated watersheds. Water quality is a critical issue due to its direct influence on public health, biological integrity of natural resources, and the economy. For example, feedbacks between water quality and aquatic organisms directly impact dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide source/sink dynamics. Temperature, nutrients, light penetration, and pollutants affect dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide production and consumption rates via processes such as photosynthesis of actively growing plants and decomposition of dead plants and animals. Climate variations (seasonal or inter-annual) directly affect the heat budget of aquatic systems through surface heat exchange between the water and atmosphere. An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide and/or other greenhouse gases is projected to exacerbate climate warming, which would further alter water temperature, ice/snow cover, and water quality characteristics in aquatic systems. Land-use/land-cover changes and anthropogenic changes affect sediment, nutrient, and chemical inputs to aquatic systems. These changes are, in turn, expected to have major impacts on population dynamics and diversity of freshwater species. A major challenge for scientists and managers is to understand the complex system of feedbacks between global change, freshwater ecosystems, and the wide array of biodiversity and ecosystem services that freshwater systems provide.

Dr. Xing Fang
Dr. James Stoeckel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • global change
  • freshwater ecosystem
  • climate change
  • ecological health
  • water quality
  • freshwater organism
  • fish habitat
  • feedbacks
  • land use
  • biodiversity
  • ecosystem services

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Elevational Shifts of Freshwater Communities Cannot Catch up Climate Warming in the Himalaya
Water 2016, 8(8), 327; doi:10.3390/w8080327
Received: 15 May 2016 / Revised: 21 June 2016 / Accepted: 22 June 2016 / Published: 3 August 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1665 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Climate warming threatens biodiversity at global, regional and local levels by causing irreversible changes to species populations and biological communities. The Himalayan region is highly vulnerable to climate warming. This calls for efficient environmental management strategies because biodiversity monitoring is costly, particularly for
[...] Read more.
Climate warming threatens biodiversity at global, regional and local levels by causing irreversible changes to species populations and biological communities. The Himalayan region is highly vulnerable to climate warming. This calls for efficient environmental management strategies because biodiversity monitoring is costly, particularly for the developing countries of the Himalaya. Species distribution modeling (SDM) represents a tool that can be used to identify vulnerable areas where biodiversity monitoring and conservation are required most urgently and can be prioritized. Here, we investigated the potential present-day community compositions of river invertebrates in the central and eastern Himalayas and predicted changes in community compositions in future decades using SDMs. We then quantified the climate-induced range shifts of benthic invertebrates along the elevational gradient and tested whether the predicted community shift is fast enough to fully compensate for the projected climate warming. Our model predicts future increases in benthic invertebrate taxonomic richness. Further, projected community shifts are characterized by the movement of warm-dwellers to higher elevations and losses in cold-dwellers. The predicted model shows that benthic invertebrate communities would not be able to compensate climate warming through uphill migration and thus would accumulate climatic debts. Our findings suggest that the ongoing warming effect would cause continued elevational range shifts of mountain river communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Effects on Freshwater Organisms and Ecosystems)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Simulation and Validation of Cisco Lethal Conditions in Minnesota Lakes under Past and Future Climate Scenarios Using Constant Survival Limits
Water 2016, 8(7), 279; doi:10.3390/w8070279
Received: 9 May 2016 / Revised: 21 June 2016 / Accepted: 29 June 2016 / Published: 7 July 2016
PDF Full-text (2657 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Fish habitat in lakes is strongly constrained by water temperature (T) and available dissolved oxygen (DO) that are changed under climate warming. A one dimensional, dynamic water quality model MINLAKE2012 was used for T and DO simulation over 48 years. A
[...] Read more.
Fish habitat in lakes is strongly constrained by water temperature (T) and available dissolved oxygen (DO) that are changed under climate warming. A one dimensional, dynamic water quality model MINLAKE2012 was used for T and DO simulation over 48 years. A fish habitat model FishHabitat2013 using simulated T and DO profiles as input was developed to determine lethal conditions of cisco Corgenous artedi in Minnesota lakes. Twenty-three lakes that had observations of cisco mortality or survival in the unusually warm summer of 2006 were used for model validation. The cisco habitat model used a lethal temperature of 22.1 °C and DO survival limit of 3 mg/L determined through model validation and sensitivity analysis. Cisco lethal conditions in 12 shallow, 16 medium-depth, and 30 deep virtual lakes were then simulated. Isopleths of total number of years with cisco kill and average cisco kill days for the years with kills under past (1961–2008) and future climate were generated to understand/extrapolate climate impacts on cisco in 620 Minnesota lakes. Shallow and medium-depth lakes are projected to not be good candidates for cisco refuge lakes, but deep lakes are possible cisco refuge lakes based on lethal condition projection under future warmer climate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Effects on Freshwater Organisms and Ecosystems)

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