Special Issue "Animal Models of Disease"

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A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Duncan C. Ferguson
Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61802, USA
Website: http://illinois.edu/ds/search?search_type=userid&search=dcf&skinId=333
E-Mail: dcf@illinois.edu
Interests: comparative thyroidology and endocrinology; veterinary clinical pharmacology; effect of environmental and nutritional compounds on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis and neurodevelopment; obesity; diabetes; distance education pedagogy

Special Issue Information

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.



Keywords

  • comparative medicine
  • animal disease
  • animal models
  • animal pathophysiology
  • veterinary diagnosis
  • veterinary therapy
  • translational medicine
  • One Medicine
  • One Health

Published Papers (1 paper)

Vet. Sci. 2014, 1(1), 3-4; doi:10.3390/vetsci1010003
Received: 11 September 2013; Accepted: 11 November 2013 / Published: 12 November 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (47 KB) | View HTML Full-text | Download XML Full-text

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Review
Title:
Review of animal models of prostate cancer bone metastasis
Authors: Jessica K. Simmons, Said M. Elshafae and Thomas J. Rosol *
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, 1925 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; E-Mail: Rosol.1@osu.edu
Abstract:
Prostate cancer bone metastases are associated with a poor prognosis and are considered incurable. Insight into the formation and growth of prostate cancer bone metastasis is required for development of new imaging and therapeutic strategies to combat this devastating disease. Animal models are indispensable in investigating cancer pathogenesis and evaluating therapeutics. Multiple animal models of prostate cancer bone metastasis have been developed, but few effectively model prostatic tumors and osteoblastic bone metastases as they occur in men. This review discusses the animal models that have been developed to investigate prostate cancer bone metastasis, with a focus on canine models and includes human xenografts and rodent models. Adult dogs spontaneously develop benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer with osteoblastic bone metastases. Large animal models, such as dogs, are needed to develop new molecular imaging tools and effective focal intraprostatic therapy. None of the available models fully reflects the metastatic disease seen in men, although the various models have provided important insight into the metastatic process. As additional models are developed and knowledge from the different models is combined, the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer bone metastasis can be deciphered and targeted for development of novel therapies and molecular diagnostic imaging.

Last update: 11 December 2013

Vet. Sci. EISSN 2306-7381 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert