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Special Issue "Urban Water Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Manfred Kleidorfer

Unit of Environmental Engineering, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 13, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +43-512-507-62134
Interests: urban water management; modeling; systems analysis; sustainability; climate change adaptation; rehabilitation of aging infrastructure
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Robert Sitzenfrei

Unit of Environmental Engineering, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 13, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +43-512-507-62195
Interests: urban water management; integrated; optimization; water distribution system analysis; urban drainage modelling; water and energy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The supply of urban areas with clean potable water, and the disposal of wastewater and stormwater, are important topics of urban water management. The functioning of the systems is important for human health and safety, preservation of the natural environment and economic development.

Urban water management is experiencing severe changes in its fundamental concepts. It is moving away from pure ‘engineering measures’ towards more sustainable, eco-friendly solutions. Examples are stormwater retention, harvesting and use instead of drainage; improvements of the urban water cycle; attempts to reduce resource consumption, energy, (micro)pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions; nutrient recovery or lifecycle considerations of new infrastructure assets. The motivation might be different in different parts of the world. For example, rapid urbanization or climate change might increase the flood risk or lead to water scarcity (or both) or a changed understanding of the urban environment might lead to a water-centric urban design for the city of the future. Consequently, this Special Issue addresses the topic of sustainable urban water management in its different aspects and invites publications on the following (non-exhaustive list) topics

  • Stormwater management (blue-green infrastructure, low impact development, water sensitive urban design) and its contribution to sustainable urban water management;

  • Understanding and improving the urban water cycle and the water balance;

  • Preservation of water resources for drinking water supply;

  • Greenhouse gas emissions from urban water systems;

  • Energy efficiency in urban water management;

  • Nutrient recovery (from waste to resources);

  • Lifecycle considerations;

  • The precautionary principle as design rule.

Prof. Dr. Manfred Kleidorfer
Prof. Dr. Robert Sitzenfrei
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainability

  • stormwater management

  • green infrastructure

  • urban water cycle

  • water quality

  • water resources

  • drainage systems

  • energy and resource efficiency

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Design and Development of Low P-Emission Substrate for the Protection of Urban Water Bodies Collecting Green Roof Runoff
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1795; doi:10.3390/su9101795
Received: 3 September 2017 / Revised: 27 September 2017 / Accepted: 27 September 2017 / Published: 4 October 2017
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Abstract
Urbanization leads to higher phosphorus (P) concentration in urban catchments. Among different stormwater retention measures, green roofs are the least efficient in phosphorus retention. Moreover, much research has shown that green roofs act as sources of phosphorus, and they can emit P in
[...] Read more.
Urbanization leads to higher phosphorus (P) concentration in urban catchments. Among different stormwater retention measures, green roofs are the least efficient in phosphorus retention. Moreover, much research has shown that green roofs act as sources of phosphorus, and they can emit P in significant loads. In this study low P emission green roof substrate was developed based on the proposed step by step procedure for the selection of materials including laboratory tests, column experiments, and the monitoring of the open air green roof model. Developed substrate is the mixture of crushed red brick (35% of volume), crushed limestone (20% of volume), and sand (45% of volume), and is characterized by a bulk density of 1.52 g/cm3, water permeability of 9 mm/min, water capacity of 24.6% of volume, and granulometric composition that meets the Landscaping and Landscape Development Research Society (FLL) guidelines. Limestone was added to limit the potential P leaching from crushed red brick and vegetated mate consisted of Sedum album, Sedum acre, Sedum kamtschaticum, Sedum spurium, Sedum reflexum, Sedum sexangulare, Dianthus deltoides, Dianthus carthusianorum, and Thymus vulgaris. The open air model experiment was run for 319 days, from March 2015 to February 2016. The total water runoff from the green roof model amounted to 43.3% of runoff from the reference roof. The only one runoff event polluted with phosphorus was connected with the outflow of melted snow from an unfreezing green roof model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Water Management)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Characteristic Rain Events: A Methodology for Improving the Amenity Value of Stormwater Control Measures
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1793; doi:10.3390/su9101793
Received: 7 September 2017 / Revised: 28 September 2017 / Accepted: 29 September 2017 / Published: 3 October 2017
PDF Full-text (3682 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Local management of rainwater using stormwater control measures (SCMs) is gaining increased attention as a sustainable alternative and supplement to traditional sewer systems. Besides offering added utility values, many SCMs also offer a great potential for added amenity values. One way of achieving
[...] Read more.
Local management of rainwater using stormwater control measures (SCMs) is gaining increased attention as a sustainable alternative and supplement to traditional sewer systems. Besides offering added utility values, many SCMs also offer a great potential for added amenity values. One way of achieving amenity value is to stage the rainwater and thus bring it to the attention of the public. We present here a methodology for creating a selection of rain events that can help bridge between engineering and landscape architecture when dealing with staging of rainwater. The methodology uses quantitative and statistical methods to select Characteristic Rain Events (CREs) for a range of frequent return periods: weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, bi-monthly, and a single rarer event occurring only every 1–10 years. The methodology for selecting CREs is flexible and can be adjusted to any climatic settings; here we show its use for Danish conditions. We illustrate with a case study how CREs can be used in combination with a simple hydrological model to visualize where, how deep and for how long water is visible in a landscape designed to manage rainwater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Water Management)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Reconnecting the Hydrologic Cycle in Urban Water Governance: Implementing Green Infrastructure through Citizen Stormwater Management
Authors: Olivia Odom Green 1 and Eva Lieberherr 2
Affiliations: 1 Atlantic States Legal Foundation, Syracuse, New York USA
2 Natural Resources Policy and Law Group, ETH, Zurich, Switzerland
Abstract: In the United States, many urban water social ecological systems (SES) function in a highly degraded regime characterized by frequent discharges of contaminated runoff and raw sewage, catastrophic flooding, and near complete severance of the hydrologic cycle. Recent advancements in stormwater best management practices aim to push the urban water SES into a regime which reconnects the hydrologic cycle and utilizes ecosystem services, such as infiltration and evapotranspiration, to improve the quality of urban and suburban water bodies while also providing ancillary benefits to the greater SES, such as green space, habitat, and air purification. Collectively, these approaches are termed green infrastructure (GI). As a decentralized approach, GI requires implementation, and thus access, to property throughout a watershed, which poses particular governance challenges in watersheds where most land is held privately. We argue that GI on private property, especially residential property, has a strong potential for reconnecting citizens to their own ecological footprint through Citizen Stormwater Management. We explore various policy instruments, using the carrots, sticks, and sermons typology, for how each instrument enables or encourages Citizen Stormwater Management [as a form of participatory governance].

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