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Special Issue "Sustainability and Urban Metabolism"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Massimo Palme

Universidad Católica del Norte, Escuela de Arquitectura, Antofagasta, Chile
Website | E-Mail
Interests: urban studies; building performance simulation; urban physics; building physics; sustainable development; climate change mitigation and adaptation
Guest Editor
Dr. Agnese Salvati

Cambridge Architectural Research Ltd., Cambridge, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: urban climate; microclimate modelling; urban heat island; climate change; urban energy modelling; urban form; building energy modelling; urban sustainability; urban resilience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Achieving sustainable development will only be possible if cities efficiency increase flows management (water, energy, food, materials, information). This Special Issue focuses on the relationship between sustainable development goals and the metabolism of cities. Authors from different disciplines (architecture and urban planning, ecology, economy, and social sciences) are invited to submit their ideas about the challenge of improving the metabolic cycles of built environments. Both theoretical and applied research articles are welcome.

Suggested topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Cities as dissipative structures
  • Urban Heat Island
  • Cities' energy management
  • Information, entropy and the city
  • Built environment and climate change
  • The size of the city and the energy consumption
  • Materials flows across the city
  • Relation between the city and the country in food production
  • Urban ecosystems
  • Urban microclimate

Prof. Massimo Palme
Dr. Agnese Salvati
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable urban development
  • urban metabolism
  • energy efficiency
  • urban ecology

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Thermal Environmental Design in Outdoor Space Focusing on Radiation Environment Influenced by Ground Cover Material and Solar Shading, through the Examination on the Redevelopment Buildings in Front of Central Osaka Station
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 337; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020337
Received: 23 December 2017 / Revised: 23 January 2018 / Accepted: 27 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
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Abstract
The outdoor open space is used for various purposes, e.g., to walk, rest, talk, meet, study, exercise, play, perform, eat, and drink. Therefore, it is desirable to provide various thermal environments according to users’ needs and their actual conditions. In this study, the
[...] Read more.
The outdoor open space is used for various purposes, e.g., to walk, rest, talk, meet, study, exercise, play, perform, eat, and drink. Therefore, it is desirable to provide various thermal environments according to users’ needs and their actual conditions. In this study, the radiation environment was evaluated, focusing on ground cover materials and solar radiation shading, through the examination on the redevelopment buildings in front of Central Osaka Station. The spatial distribution of solar radiation shading was calculated using ArcGIS and building shape data. Surface temperatures on the ground and wall are calculated based on the surface heat budget equation. MRT (Mean Radiant Temperature) of the human body is calculated assuming that the human body is a sphere. The most dominant factor for the radiant environment is solar radiation shielding and the next is the improvement of surface cover. It is difficult to make SET* (Standard new Effective Temperature) comfortable in the afternoon by both solar radiation shielding and improved surface cover because the air temperature is too high on a typical summer day (August). However, particularly in Rooftop Gardens and Green Garden, because the areas of shade grass and water are large, there are several places where people do not feel uncomfortable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability and Urban Metabolism)
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Open AccessArticle Sustainable Urbanization Synergy Degree Measures—A Case Study in Henan Province, China
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010009
Received: 11 November 2017 / Revised: 16 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 21 December 2017
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Abstract
Sustainable urbanization emphasizes properly handling the relationships between people, people and society, and people and nature in the process of urban development. However, sometimes these interactions are difficult to quantify. Through an analysis of the structure and functions of the sustainable urbanization system,
[...] Read more.
Sustainable urbanization emphasizes properly handling the relationships between people, people and society, and people and nature in the process of urban development. However, sometimes these interactions are difficult to quantify. Through an analysis of the structure and functions of the sustainable urbanization system, this paper introduced synergetic theory and constructed a sustainable urbanization synergy system (SUSS) with five subsystems; demographic change, economic development, spatial structure, environmental quality, and social development; to study the synergistic development and orderly evolution trend of the sustainable urbanization composite system. Using sustainable urbanization in Henan province as an example, a mathematical quantitative model was established to measure the subsystem order degrees and the composite system synergy degree from 2006 to 2015. The results were consistent with the actual situation and indicated that over time, sustainable urbanization in Henan developed towards a more harmonious and orderly state, though the overall synergy degree was not high. It was found that the model was a sound basis for scientific judgment and effective decision-making when seeking to coordinate sustainable urbanization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability and Urban Metabolism)
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Open AccessArticle Slum Regeneration and Sustainability: Applying the Extended Metabolism Model and the SDGs
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2273; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9122273
Received: 17 November 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 5 December 2017 / Published: 8 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2153 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper examines the extent to which slum redevelopments have been successful in improving the sustainability of human settlements. Sustainability is measured in two ways: through the Extended Metabolism Model that looks at resource consumption, wastes, and liveability outcomes; and, through the framework
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This paper examines the extent to which slum redevelopments have been successful in improving the sustainability of human settlements. Sustainability is measured in two ways: through the Extended Metabolism Model that looks at resource consumption, wastes, and liveability outcomes; and, through the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The study compares the sustainability of informal slum settlements in Addis Ababa with high-rise slum clearance apartments; such clearance is the model mostly used for the world’s informal settlements. The results show very little difference in resource consumption and waste produced but show liveability outcomes are mixed: Economic benefit is substantially improved in the high-rise areas due to becoming part of the formal economy, but community networks and trust are substantially lost when people transfer from the slums. This paper suggests that slum policy could be shifted from the Modernist high-rise slum clearance approach to a more organic, community-based renewal of the slums themselves in which infrastructure for energy, water, and waste can be brought in. New technology that fits into community-based governance structures allows such infrastructure to be a viable option, as well as enabling formal economic benefits. Some hybrid approaches may be needed in many slum improvement programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability and Urban Metabolism)
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Open AccessArticle Correlations between GIS-Based Urban Building Densification Analysis and Climate Guidelines for Mediterranean Courtyards
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2255; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9122255
Received: 1 November 2017 / Revised: 28 November 2017 / Accepted: 28 November 2017 / Published: 6 December 2017
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Abstract
This study identifies and proposes A GIS-based exploration of the relationships between aspect ratio of inner courtyards, porosity of the urban fabric and the climatic factors where it is located. To perform that comparison, morphological and measurement methods have been used to delineate
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This study identifies and proposes A GIS-based exploration of the relationships between aspect ratio of inner courtyards, porosity of the urban fabric and the climatic factors where it is located. To perform that comparison, morphological and measurement methods have been used to delineate spatial boundaries of urban densification. This methodology has been applied to a case study in Spain, where regulation establishes several climatic zones. Examples of cities in these zones have been examined to establish possible correlations. This paper analyses the particularities of these different urban scenarios, considering the effects of climate on the real urban densification. The purpose of this study is to find a relationship between the historical inner courtyards dimensions and the climate of the zone where they are located. In order to frame the real thermal behaviour of the inner courtyard in the context of the vernacular typologies studied, a representative sample of inner courtyards has been selected. The monitoring data presented allow quantifying the courtyard’s ability to temper the maximum temperature values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability and Urban Metabolism)
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Open AccessArticle Sustainable Block Design Process for High-Rise and High-Density Districts with Snow and Wind Simulations for Winter Cities
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2132; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9112132
Received: 5 October 2017 / Revised: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 5 November 2017 / Published: 20 November 2017
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Abstract
Urban designs that consider regional climatic conditions are one of the most important approaches for developing sustainable cities. In cities that suffer from heavy snow and cold winds in winter, an urban design approach different than that used for warm cities should be
[...] Read more.
Urban designs that consider regional climatic conditions are one of the most important approaches for developing sustainable cities. In cities that suffer from heavy snow and cold winds in winter, an urban design approach different than that used for warm cities should be used. This study presents a scientific design process (the sustainable design approach) that incorporates environmental and energy assessments that use snow and wind simulations to establish guidelines for the design of urban blocks in high-rise and high-density districts so that the impact of snow and wind can be minimized in these cities. A city block in downtown Sapporo, Japan, was used as a case study, and we evaluated four conceptual models. The four models were evaluated for how they impacted the snow and wind conditions in the block as well as the snow removal energy. Based on the results, we were able to identify the design guidelines in downtown Sapporo: an urban block design with higher building height ratio without the mid-rise part can reduce the snowdrifts and lower the snow removal energy. The proposed sustainable urban design approach would be effective in improving the quality of public spaces and reducing snow removal energy in winter cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability and Urban Metabolism)
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